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THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, FRIDAY, JfXE 12, 1925 



i NION NOSES OUT AGGII 

( unilnued from I'afte 1) 

But ia the 11 i m li the Agntea were beM 
scoreless ebile Union •queeaed in ■ winn- 
ing urn. Hawkea opened with ■ sin^c. 
Bouteilef flied out .m<l Majofaki liii 
again. Hoeen died out to Temple on foul 
n-niioi-\ but boljb beae runners advanced. 
Then Snydei rolled one to Temple who 
fumbled Iouk enough to let Hawkee i 
the rubber. 

The more: 

UNION M.A.C. 

lb bfa |K> a •'!' ••>> I"' ■ 

Kiplon.'i 4 J 



If It's For 

GOOD SHOE REPAIRING ... HAT RENOVATING . . . SHOE DYEING 

It pays to consult the .. -. MASTER SHOE 

The Amherst Shoe Repairing to. rebuilders 

,*v vv-AV -rn POST OFFICE. AMHERST MASS. 



DAMERST & 
DEACON 



ON WAY TO POST OFFICE, AMHERST MASS. 



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Before You Leave — 

Make it a Point to Kill in Your Needs for Summer Travel. Summer Sport Wear or Just Plain Summer We Take 
Thts Opportunity to Thank You for Your Patronage During the Pas, Year and Wish Everyone a Good Vacanon 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



o o 



Totals M « 87 li Totals 33 1 1 *•-'■> ■' 
inning- It * * » • 7 * ■ _ 

Union ' ( > » • ° rl 

M A c I I <^-*> 

Runs Ripton. BswfcN 8, Uo.utull.r. Makot.ki. 

Hodm. Shapiro. Cahill. Ten,,, I.- '-'• MobtrB, 

M. ,..<>< li, Taylor. Error*, Kipioii. Hswkaa, 
U.lliiiKhorst, Tempi'-. lMiratiti. Two base nits. 
.Shap.ro. IfcGaOCfe. Three has- hits, Makolski 2. 
Tempi.-, lerranli. Home runs. Tempi'" Si. rilio- 
hits, Richards. McGcOCfa. 1-Vrr.uiii. ( ahill. Ilaher, 
lloe'lm. Double plays. Molxrg to McVey. RMM 
pn balls, off Wellinghorst 2. off Taylor S, oil 
Nash 3. Struck out, by Wellinghorst N. by Taylor 
2. by Nash 1. Uriel Pfccfctr, Nash. 1'inpire. 
Connelly. 
♦Two out when winning run was scored. 



"SIDNEY" TO RE-CREATE 

(,..ii i in tied from Pafte I) 
the supreme emotional expel -irnt C of Ins 

life, hie passionate and unrewarded love 
of the beautiful and high-spirited Psewiopr 

Devarcux, remains partly clouded in 
myatery. So, even for thoat familiar with 
the outline of Sidney'* career, t lie play still 

often something in the way of suspense. 

There are in the play all of the old de- 
pendable romantic ap|>cals, jealousy. 

hatred, fighting, love and death. The 
background is colorful in costume and 
peraonal allusion. The spirit of Eliaa- 
berhaa Eaglaad is alwayi abroad, and 

through the four acts mOVWJ in sardonic 
state the incomparable <|ueen. 

The leading parts will lie taken l>y 
|K)pular and cx|>erien<ed members of the 
Roister Doiater society. Theodore J. 
(".rant of Auburmlale is by talent and 

temperament peculiar.) fitted to i mner- 

sonate the gallant Sidney. Mis- Margaret 

C. Shea of Holyoke should make IYnelo|>e 
(|iiile as fascinating M she was in real life. 
Neil ( . Robmaon ot ArlifiKton, who 
attracted so much favoral.le conimeiit in 
"Wedding lUlls". will essay the Karl of 
Leicester in varied moods. Oxford, the 
courtly antagonist, will Ik- enacted by 
|oha Moran of Amherst, and the shrewdly 
capricious Queen Klizalieth will Im- pre 
sented by Kmil J. Corwin of Kast Boston, 
the president of the society ami a gifted 
eonudian. The management of the play 

is in the haadeoi Horace H. Woraeara of 
Bernardaton. 



SNIFFEN TO LEAD TRACK TEAM 

(Continued from Page tl 
at W.P.I.i ha l»r«>ke the |X)le vault record 
of 10 ft. 6 in. set by Burton GoOgina 'It, 

and in the final meet at New Hampshire, 
he jumped 5 ft. X in <<> «ain a tie for first 
and to surpass the mark of S ft. ~1 «• 

established by K. E. Gillett '<>x. Tucker 

is now possessor of both the inddor and 

outdoor high jump record- 

The team as a whole showed a lack of 

second place material and was forced to 

break several records to emerge as a 
winner in 15 out of 4 dual meets. In the 

last meet at New Hampshire the Aggies 
were outclassed by '.Ml to 36, but then 
record at the Kastcrns and the New Eng- 
land* was better than it has been in recent 
years. I lie squad suffers the loss ol several 
very de|>cndablc men in captain Charlie 
Ron of Lee, Love of Auburn, Zwhfcr ol 

Holyoke, and Slowen of Shelburne I alls. 
who are graduating. A good nucleus of 
juniors, a less ■ophocnorc*, and a likely 
bunch of freshmen remain for Coach 

Derby's 1026 ■quad. 



ADELPHIA EITCTS OFFICERS 

(Continued from Pufce 1) 

and told how the present sorictv came into 
existence at MAC The n,M speaker 

%vas Laurence I.. Jones, who spoke as the 
representative of tie junior member*, 
expressing their appreciation of the work 

of the senior members during the past 
year, and pledging fidelity to the aims ot 

the organization, He was followed by 

Prof. Hicks, who slat, d that the teal aim 

ol Adelphia is to create a s. ntiment among 

ll„. student body, and to lead student 

thought in matters vital to the College. 
President Lewis, the concluding speaker, 
outlined the principles which should 

govern the SOCietJ in the future, and th« 

aims to the accomplishment ol which the 
coming year should be given. 



FROSH DEFY SENATE 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

reconsider the rJecision of the class. 
Lawrence lonesahd Alton Gustafsoo pre- 
sented the Views Of the Senate and spoke 
on the dire result- which would follow it 

the freshmen did not abide by the Senate 

ruling. Nevertheless the freshmen again 
voted bv a very laisM- majority to continue 

on the course which was already started. 

The tact was emphasized during the dis- 
cussion that the action was not in any 

M nse intended a- a rebellion against the 

authority ol the Senate but merely as a 

way of repealing what the freshmen con- 
sidered an unjust rule. 



COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM 

(Continued from Pafte I) 

that there will l>e larger numbers repre- 
senting the more recent graduates. Many 
of the classes are holding individual 
banquets on Saturday. 

Kvents on Alumni Day begin with the 
baseball game to be held between the 
odds and the evens in the morning. The 
game will Ik- followed by the important 
annual alumni meeting in the Memorial 
| Building. The report of the nominating 

committee, who have nominated Ernest 
Russell 10 as president of the association, 
will be made, and elections of officers will 
take place. The sjH-cial committee on 
administration, which has In-en invest i 
gating the possibility of improving the 
status of college administration, is to 
make its report, and it is exi>ected that 
the business they present will call for a 
■pedal executive session. President Lewis 
is to address the association. 

An alumni dinner is to be held in 
DraiK-r Hall Saturday noon, and will be 
followed by a few short addresses Horn 
the steps of the Dining Hall. An alumni 
parade will then In- formed, under P. F. 
Whitman 'lo as marshal, and the various 
classes, some in costume, will march to 
Alumni Field to attend the varsity game 
with Connecticut Aggie. Lrateruity re- 
unions will take Up the rest of the after- 
noon, and the evening will be occupied 
by the presentation of "Sidney". 

I he Baccalaureate Address will Ik- given 

on Sunday afternoon l>> President Lewis. 
in Bowker Auditorium. Sunday evening 

there will be the president's reception to 

the seniors, in the rhododendron garden. 

(lass Day, on Monday will mark the 

end of the ceremonies. The senior cadet 

officers will be given their commissions 

at the parade ol the commencement drill. 

the first thing in the morning. The 

seniors will then gather on the senior 

fence, with their friends forming an 

amphitheatre around them for the class 

day exercises. The Campus Oration will 

be given by Carl K. I". < '.uterman. Arthur 

M. o'Conr.or will give the Hatchet 

Oration, the Class Ode will l>e read by 

Walter W. W'hittum, George L. Church 

will give the Ivy Oration, Donald L. 
Parker, the Pipe Oration and the Class 
Oration will be presented by Lewis Keith. 

The Commencement Address will be 

delivered by Dr. Edwin W. Allen, chief 
,,l the Office ol Experiment Stations, <>i 
the United States Department o! Agri- 
culture at Washington. 

The Soph-Senior Hop in the Memorial 
building will be the finale of all the activi- 
ties. 



will be broken and the party will set off 
for a ride of four hours, bringing them to 
the position of the camp for the next 
night. Mess will be followed by an in- 
struction hour, after which the men will 
be free until the work of the evening. 

A Dt:j mile route has baM laid out, to 
1m- covered in ten days, with one day 
for rest at Woodstock, \t. The daily 
inarch will be over about twenty miles. 
The schedule of camping places is as lob 
lows: 

June 1'.)— (ireenfield, Mass. 
20— Brattleboro, Vt. 
21— Bellows Falls, Vt, 
22 --Claremont, N. 11. 
215 -Windsor, Vt. 
24 — Woodstock, Vt. 
■2>\ Bethel, Vt. 
27— Northfield, \ t. 
28— Waterbury, At. 
29 Burlington, Vt. 
The return trip to the college in the 
middle of the summer will be made in the 
same manner over the same route. The 
three weeks that the nun are to Ik- on 
the road during the two trips will be taken 
out of their time at camp, so that they 
will only spend three weeks at Ethan 
Allen, instead of six. 



Judging Teams to 

Receive Certificate 

Recognition by Certificate of All 
Members of Teams to Begin This 
Summer. 



The judging teams have decided on the 
certificates of team inemlK-rship which 
are to Ik- annually awarded to all memlH-rs 
of the various judging teams of the college. 
These certificates will be very similar to 
those which are issued by the athletic 
department and will bear the signature- 
of the president of the college as well as 
that of the coach of the particular team. 
Prof. Henry F. Judkins. chairman of the 
committee, is preparing the certificate, 
and expects to have them ready for dis- 
tribution sometime during the summer. 
The certificates will Ik- mailed to those 
members of judging teams who art to 
graduate this year. 

EASTERN STAR HOLDS 

BANQUET AT DRAPER 



Over two hundred people attended the 
banquet of Unity Chapter, Order of the 

Eastern Star, at Draper Hall hurt Wednes 

day night. Mrs. Mary E. Hubbard pre 
sided, and Mrs. Annie L. Woodman, 
grand matron of the grand chapter, was 
the principal speaker of Hie evening. 

After the banquet the gathering ad- 
journed to the Masonic Temple. Cold 
pieces were presented to the grand patron 
and grand matron by L S. Dickinson '10 
and to the associate grand matron by 
L, S. Walker '06. 

Music during the banquet was furnished 
by a three piece orchestra led by "Red' 
Parker. 



Land. Card. Club 

Hold Last Meeting 

Cormier Elected President for Coming 
Year. 



Will the man who received gold- 
plated badge marked "Association of 
College Track Coaches of America' 
from Mr. Carl Schy, local tailor, kind- 
ly return to me. 

L. L. Derby 



R. O. T. C. OFFICERS 

(Continued from Page I) 

students, under their own officers and 
with their own guard, which w ill be chosen 
and changed dnih/. The daily routine 
will begin with an early rise (at 6.48a. ni.) 
when immediately after breakfast camp 



College Candy Kitchen 



Bring in your friends and relatives 
tor lunch and refreshments 

A GRADUATION GIFT — A BOX OF 
PAGE & SHAW'S CHOCOLATES 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

The Best in Lunches, Candy, Sodas, Ice Cream and Smokers' Supplies 






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Pi 

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V»v 

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INTERESTING FACTS OF HISTORY 

George Washington and His Commission 



On July 3, 1775, Gen. George 
Washington took command of 
the colonial forces at Cam- 
bridge,Mass.,withintheshadow 
of Harvard College. This event 
will be appropriately celebrated 
on July 3, 1925. 

The commission, which made 
George Washington "General 
and Commander-in»Chief of 
the Army of the United 
Colonies" by vote of the Con- 
tinental Congress at Philadel- 
phia, is dated June 19, 1775, and 
is signed by John Hancock, who 
was then President of Congress. 



This commission was the first 
historic document signed by 
John Hancock and next to the 
Declaration of Independence, 
signed by him the next year, is 
the most important. 

The original engrossed copy of 
the Washington commission 
can be seen in the Library of 
Congress. A photographic copy 
of this commission, as well as a 
facsimile of the Declaration of 
Independence, has been repro- 
duced by the John Hancock 
Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany of Boston. 



At 



Tfc« John Hancock li particularly interested in Insuring colUw men and 
women and in obtaining college graduate! for the personnel of the field staff. 



Over Sixty Years in Busi- 
ness. Now Injuring Over 
Tu<o Billion Dollars in 
Policies on 3,500,000 lives 



■T-tEX'^ 



"ufe Insurance Compaf 

or Boston, m*«schu«tti 



to 
ft* 

.v. 

ti 

r r*i 

H 

Ha 






The New M. A. C. Song Book 

At the Treasurer'* ftS» ffJJ 
$1.10 By Mail 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



DEUEL'S 



The Landscape Club held its final 

meeting Tuesday night at Wilder Hall in 
order that the seniors might hid farewell 
to the department, that a last message 
might be delivered l>y Prof. Waugh and 

Prof. Harrison, and finally that new 

officers might be elected for the coming 

\C.iV. 

Cormier was elected to lead the clul) j 
next year and Buckley was chosen to 
hold the secretary-treasurer position. It 
was decided that next year would intro- 
duce a period of renewed activity for the 

clul). 

Refreshments were served at the CtOSC 

of the informal meeting. 



SODA LUNCH 

Hot Waffles and Maple Syrup 

Fresh Fruit Orangeade 

Fresh Fruit Lemonade 

Fresh Strawberry Sundae 

SANDWICHES - SHAKES — FUDGE SUNDAES 

Pies — Doughnuts 
— Quality — 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

Give the'Trat" 
Something useful when you leave. 
We suggest a Hoover or Brunswick 
THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Ws* 

NEW PRICES t ,ij| 

Men's Whole Sole*. Rubber Heels - - ■ 'j-jl 

Men's Half Soles. Rubber Heels - - * i'jl 

Men's Rubber Soles, Rubber Heels • " [A 

Mens Half Soles ' ' 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOUSE 
Open tills P. M. 



5% jfflagflaritttffgttg 



A« 1 •; 




Vol. XXXVI. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 23, 1925 



No. • 




Freshmen Enter 

Incoming Class 

Class Roster Shows 38 Co-Eds on List, Total Registration 

Less Than 1928 



Hit- Class of '2 U baa started its college 

career with a sjnaller enrollment than that 
„t the l-'reshman dase of last year hut 
with a greater numher of women students. 
statistics in the Registrar's office show ■ 

total enrollment of 17") students ot whom 

, women. The roster of the claM \» 

a i follows: 



Adams, Bud T. 

Adams, Harold S. 
Adams, Stephen 
Alberti, Frande D, 
Ansell, Harold K. 
Avery, Blanche D. 
Bailey, Stanley F. 
Barr, Charles W. 
Bartlett, Irene L 
Bates, Ira S. 
Benjamin, Hazel I.. 
li, in Philip 

. Cheeky I-. 
Btaisdell, Mathew I.. 
Bliss, lois A. 
Bond, James K. Jr. 

Borastein, Louis 
Bowie, Robert L. 
Bracldey, Floyd I.. 
Burgeta, Emory D. 
( .limey, George G, 

t trnith. Lawrence A. 
( alter, Warner H. . 
i liadwkk, John S 
Chapin, Alice S. 
t barkston, George K. 

Cleaves, Charles S. 
( 1, mints, Charles K. 

CoUms, Edgar W. 

t OHMS, Lawrence A. 

( eok, Flor e n c e M. 
t onsen, Harry B. 
Coakos, Andrew 
Cos, Adelhert \V. 
(row ley, Dennis M. 
Devis, Kendall K. 
Dawe, Ralph T. 
Davis, Donald A. 
Day, Wm. A. P. 

I >r\ine, John W. 
Dht, Raymond 
Dattoa, (ieorge \V. 
Dyer, Arnold W. 
I.U'iii, Win. < •. 
Egas, Wm. A. 
Elliot, Davis H. 
I airbairn, Wm. R. 
Faulk, Kuth A. 
Flint, < ieorge 1L 
Foaaeca, Martin G. 
I '>nt, line, Mildred 
I oster, Edward C. 
I oster, T h o mas W. 
Frost, Charles A. 
1 lagliarducco, A. L. 
1 i.i-per, Frank 



Dalton 

Whitinsville 

Easthamptoa 

< ireenfield 

( irantwood, N.J. 

t ire en fi el d 

Middteboro 

Pittsburg, I'a- 

Brattleboro, Vt. 

Whitinsville 

AshneM 

Don hest, i 
Reading 
Mt. Hermon 
Springfield 
Soutii Lam aster 

Amherst 
East Milton 
Strong, Maine 
Melrose 

South Hadley 

Worcester 

Amherst 

Worcester 
Sh.Hield 

Everett 

( ianlner 
Melrose 
I .tst Brimueld 

Millers Kails 

Ha.lley 

Lasthatnpton 

Lynn 

FraminKham 

Boston 

Springfield 

North Adams 

Bedford 

Watertown 

Arlington 

N. Springfield, \'t. 

Carlisle 

Falmouth 

East Braintree 

Springfield 

I )art mouth 

Rockland 

Brockton 

Lincoln 

Boston 

Fall River 

I laydcnville 

Sher bo ru 

Belmont 

Springfield 

Dighton 

Walpole 



1 'iaiidoinenico, S. 

Goodwin, Lawrence II. Wolteetoa 

Gordon, < .. B. West Newton 

Graves, Arthur H. Shelburne Falls 

I, Lyman W. I onway 

:, Richard W. Cambridge 

Hammond, Marjorie A. Natick 

Harrington, Mary E. Holyoke 

Harris, Robert II. (ireenfield 

Hawley, Guila G. WestfieW 

Henderson, Everett S. W. Hartford. Ct. 

Hinchey, Anne L. Pahner 

Hintze, Roger T. Amherst 



Whitinsville 
( keen's harms, ( t. 

Northfield, Vt. 



Timothy 1. 
rlotchlnss, I. P. 
Howard, Martin S. 

Continued on Pafte 4) 

1 KRTIFICATES GIVEN 

TO JUDGING TEAMS 



■Academic Activities Board to Reward 
Team Members. 



Members of the various agricultural 
JU'l^in^ teams on the campus are to re- 
<'i\( ^jKiial certificates in recognition of 
•keif work, as a result of action taken by 
*< Academic Activities Board last 
ewnmer. Representatives of the judging 
met last spring before the close of 
fcfcool for the purpose of stimulating 
■Merest in their work and to give more 
Puhliiity to the judging contests. Al- 
though it has been the custom for mem- 
he various teams to receive awards 
°' I up? and medals, nevertheless they have 
rev er received any special recognition 
(Continued on Past 4) 



COLLEGIAN BOARD 

HEADED BY CO-ED 



Mary T. Boyd 26 Chosen Editor-in- 
Chief and John F. Lambert 'lb 
Managing Editor. 



For the first time in ita history, the 

( oi.t.i;(,iA\ is to have a CO-ed for editor- 
in-chief. Mary T. Boyd '36 ol Jacksoa 
ville, Florida, well known for her remark 

ably aucceaaful "( ider rVesa", waa elected 
to bead the paper al ■ meeting ol the 

editorial board last I riday nielli. John 

I". Lambert 'I'd ol Gleasoodale, who baa 

been campm editor, was chosen .i-, 

managing editor, 

The shake-up in tin- personnel ol the 
editorial hoard lollow, d the eli114iu.1t ion ol 
Arthur Y. Buckley L'ti because ol football 
and the resignation of Herman E. Ptcfcena 

'87. Other members oi the various depart' 

inents have been i«- arranged as follows: 
athletics, William L. Dole *27 and Harold 

E. Clark '98; campus, Raymond Diftey'27, 

Josephine I'an/iia '38, Ellsworth Batnanl 

'28 and Krnest L. Spencer _>v co-ed, 
Francea Bruce '-7. faculty, Frank J. 

Botulinskt '21. 



FOOTBALL SQUAD 
HARD AT WORK 



Radical Change 

In Frosh-Soph Rules 

Nightshirt Parade and Kazoo Night 
Postponed Until Inter-class Foot- 
ball Came. 



There has been inaugurated a marked 
change in the program of the various 
I i< diiii.ui S>phoiiiore activities with the 

beginning Of the present college year. 
Raaoo Night, the night upon which are 

held the boxing and wrestling matches 

between the champions of the two low, 1 
classes, and the Nightshirt Parade in 

which the Freshmen were former!) given 

their first taste ol Sophomore discipline, 
have l.eell put oil liom the hist week ol 
college to some later date, which has 
not been definitely decided upon. In 

previous \e.n~. a, membera oi the uppei 
classes well know . these two conteste were 

held on the first two lights ol the college 

year, a d d ing to the haste and confusion 
which alwaj a mark the first week oi college 
especiall) for the members oi the incoming 

class. To aVOtd some ol the contusion this 

year, and especiall) to prevent inter- 
ference with f rsternit) malting, il has been 
decided to postpone these eventa until 

some lau-r time. This arrangement will 

also allow the beshmen U> get acquainted 
with each other ami with their new 

eurroundings. According to the new 
echedule, Raaoo Night will probably take 

place on the ni^hl foUowiog the lieshtnail 

S op h omore tnotball game, which is likel) 

to Ik- played on a Friday afternoon. If 

I he game ahould l»- played on Saturday, 

II will be followed' by the Nightshirt 

I'a.ade. 



Freshmen Victorious 

In Annual Rope Pull 

Neither Class is Wet in Thrilling Battle 
Across College Pond 



COMPARATIVELY FEW 
FRESHMEN PLEDGED 



Less than a Hundred Men Put On 
Pledge Buttons. 



First Practice Game Played Between 
A and B Teams. 



Varsity football has been under wa\ at 
M.A.C. for two weeks For the first week 
the s<ptail worked out three times a day in 
oppressive heat but all were loyal. Twcn 

ty-five candidates r e ported the first day 

including seven letter men. So many 
wearers of the football M have not Repor- 
ted at this early date for several years, 
and much credit U due them. Another 
pleasing feature wa- the (at t t I1.1t a large 
coaching statt was available. "Eddie" 

Bike '88, helped for a week and 'Charlie" 
McGeoch 'Jo. lor ten days before going 

to their respective positions, Again "Pop" 

Clark is back helping with the serubs. 
"Ed" Tumey '2'.i the freshman COUCh, and 
"Red" Ball '21, the baseball mentor, are 
assisting until their own johs < all them 
away. Several new recruits have reported 

since college opened an thai ■ C team was 

formed, but "I'op" (lark will be ghtd to 
see many more. 

The s(|ti id looked good in the practice 
game Saturday. Although several ol the 
candidates were kept out of the cfaufa lie 
cause of various injuries suffered in earlier 
practice session-, two k o <xI dubs were 
organized. One verv propitious feat lire ol 
the lineup was the strength of the second 
team. With such a likely looking bunch of 
subs the first team berths will Im- held only 
by keen competition. The first team was 

probably confronted with as formidable a 

B outfit as Aggie baa supported in leveral 

years. Yet in spiteot that fact tvventv-two 

points were piled np against them in forty 

minutes of actual play . 

It may Ik- noticed with interest that 
none of the other New England colleges 
tallied even in this neighborhood in their 

practice games played on the same day. 

Another fact that should interest anyone 
with foresight is that on studying the line- 
up one finds that a whole team may In- 
formed from the seniors on the squad and 
many of these will not be kept out of 
regular berths by competition. Therefore, 
freshmen and sophomores who have any 
hope of playing varsity football will never 
have a better chance if they start seizing 
it now. 

The lineup for the game : 

A Team 



MANY CHANGES 

IN FACULTY LIST 



Prof. Powers will Head Physics De- 
partment for Coming Year. 



Jones, re 
Amstein.rt 
Thurlow, rg 
Couhig, c 
Cart w right, lg 
Marx, It 
Cook, le 
(iustafson, qb 
Sullivan, rhb 



B Team 

le, lhb, Sawyer 

le, Malley 

It, Cavin 

Ig, Baker 

c Mulhern 

rg, Trull 

rt, Fessenden 

rt, McAllister 

rt. Tulloch 



(Continued on Page 3) 



A nuinlier of new laces will Im- seen 
among our faculty this year as a result of 
the changes made during the summer. One 
of the major alterations has been the 
appoin tme n t of Wallace I-. Powers as 
profeasjpT and head of the department of 

Physics thus filling tint vacancy left by 

P. B. H aab roucfc in the summer of 1984. 
Prof. Lowers graduated bom (lark 

College in 1910; pursued graduate study 

at Clark University from 1910-1914; 
1910-1913 he waa aasiotanl professor of 
plrysica at CI, ok Couege; 1914-1910 
associate ol mathematics and physics al 
the University of Richmond; in 1 7 in- 
structor in phyMrs.it Simmons; 1917- 192G 

instructor at New York University; and 

has been assistsnl professor in Physics 

since I'.lL'd. 

Miner J. Markuson replaces I'rol. 
James L. St rah. in as assistant professor 
of rural engi n e eri n g . Mr. Markuson is a 

graduate of the University of Minnesota, 

.\n<\ (or the last two years has been in the 
department oi agricultural engineering at 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

Leon R. Quintan succeed- Prof. Prentiss 
French aa assistant professor of landscape 
gardening. Prof. Quinlan graduated from 
Colorado Agricultural College in 1921. 
lb- was connected with the Colorado Agri- 
cultural College Extension Station from 
1920 to [922 and studied at the School 
ol Landscape Gardening at Harvard. 

Continued on I'afte 4; 



Two-Year Course 

Opens Oct. 5th 



The t lose ol the 1 Uahuig se.i-.oll on Sun 
day evening at six o'clock marked I he 

termination of the second attempt t<> 

conduct rushing under the new plan bv 

which the beshmen have a ill, nice to 

visit all the fraternity houses on the cam 

pus the first* two nights and to become 
luither acquainted al particular fraterni 

ties hv subsequent visits. Less than a 

hundred neophytes, however, came out 
ot chapel wearing pledge buttoos Mondaj 
morning. 

Following is a list of the pledges to the 
various fraternities; 

Pki Sigma Kappa. 1928 C R. Clem 

Mils, E. I). Burgees, M. S. Howard, P. B. 

Steele, W. B. Robertson, I . I Richards, 

B. T. Adams, C. E. Kelley, ( . S. (leaves, 

B. J. Rudquiat, P. B. ktansur'. r.ijs 

Howard Thomas. 

Kappa Sigma. 1929 J. R. Kay, K. F. 
McKlttrick, J. W. Smith I. M. Mills 
I-. I). Thayer Jr. W. R. I airbairn Iv II. 
NichoU K llenl/e H. K. Ansell, K. W 

Nash, A. F Kinney. 1928 I . R. Smith. 

A'pka Gamma Hko. 1929 C.R.John- 
ion, K. II. Marsh, \ M.n ione. J. Bond Jr., 
G. W. Duttoa, I S. Bates, II. S. Adams 

.s'ljoi/.t I'hi h.pstUm. 1929 l> II Elliot, 
I \ Sullivan, P. S. Uannev, I). II. Tidd. 

K. K. Davis, W. A. Egaa, J. J. Poaal 
K. I\ Nickcrson, K. M. Perry. 1938 

William Burke, Krnest Spe nc e r . 

Alpka Sigma Phi 1909 E. L. Kdleher, 

I). M. CrOWley, T. E, Lane. L. S. Walker 
Jr., L. W. ( ollins, K. I) Kees, (. B. GOT 
don, V. TclTt. J. B. Zielinski Jr., J. M. 
Regan, E. A. Tompkins, F. E. Braklev . 
H. Harris. I'.IL'S ( .. ( . I.aiin. M. I (ami 
Thrta (lit. 1999 A. W. Dyer. K. T. 
Dawe, W. G. Hunter, P. R. Plunier, II. 
S. Pease. MIL'S Walter Biav 

KapfCamma I'ln. 1989 -W.O'L arj 
F. Gesper, A. Conhoa, E. C, Prouty, K. 

I ) Manchester, E. C. Shuman. 

Q, /. !'. 1929 M. Rich, K. A. Krein- 
baum, (•• B. Flint, L. II. White, I). O. 
Webber, IL R, Copsmi, A. H. Graves, M. 
L. Blaisdell, C. E. Walkden. 1928— E. 

R. Marsh. 

Ku/>f><i Epsila*. 1929 J E. Paulson. 
I.. A. ( arrutli. A. L. < «ghaduci i. C. D. 

Voung, B. Nitkiewic/, W. R. Phinney. 
LambdaCki Alpha. 1999 Charles Barr, 

John Chadwick, Stephen < .iamlomenico, 

Irving llotchkiss, Russell Whitten, Ed- 
ward yOUttg. 1928 Paul I Use. 

Delta /'In Alpha, 1929 Phillip Bern, 
M. (1. Fonse a, II C. Mhtsuk. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 

BASEBALL PLANNED 



Nine Starts Well. Will Play Sprinj*- 
field Today. 



Although victory was grand lor the 
freshman class in the m\u man rope pull 

a. loss the Aggie I'on, I last Satuiday attei 
noon, it was robbed o! some ot its jjoi v 
by the fad that the sophomores, although 

beaten, were not drenched in the muddy 

walei at loss which the rOpl WM stretched. 
As usual, the freshmen met at the Drill 
Hall and iiiaiched in loekstep to tin- ,-ast 
side ol the pond. Soon the sophomore 
team had lined up Opposite and all wailed 
in the loosest ol suspense loi the pulling 

to commence. At ».-■"> the starting piatol 
was fired nnd both « lass, s strained, Imu^ 

my the heavy rope up out ol the water. 

Aa the rope tightened and swayed, it 
doael) missed "B« v.ie" Barnes' camera 

which had been set up precarious!} mai 

and several contestanta were momentarily 
illegally too dose to the ground. 

lor the hisl lew lllimiles the second 

yew im o gained ground while largo 
Kioups ,,i excited and poorly urge 11 i and 

{Union and olhei spectators tried lo ^,-t 
the bosh into. 1 Bteady awing, other fresh 
men doused water and lemona ml lino 

tans oi their ahead) perspiring class 

males. Gradually the somewhat heavier' 

neophytes began to feel the rope K i\,- ., 

Jittle, ami with renewed eiM-r^v t hey kepi' 
thi ro|M- iconjling their \\a\ sloulv for 

[several glorious ,,r agonizing inin'ntee! 

The sophoinoies came so close to ||„- 
ripplea and mud that alioiil a do/en had 

10 drop back on tin- rope to keep dry' 

le.t. Finally, however, the sophs rallied 

and stopped their pond-ward rich-. For 
tin remaining few- momenta the rope 

moved firM in one direction ami then in 
the other. When the (inalshols were tired, 
however, the middle of the io|m- was lar 
over tin- freshman bank and both learns 

wen- intact on then respective shores. 

Ex h austed, hut dry, both teams cheered 
their opponent* and an enl hiisiasti. pt_"> 
group carried the rojx- to the Drill Hall. 

The ■pact a to n wen- much daeanpointed 

in the fad that the losing team did not 
« loss the dirty DOCUL Ihis is the BBCOOd 
vear thai the ouliome has been thus. 
Last tail the I'.IL'S heavers succeeded only 
in pulling their opponents to the water's 
edge in the ten minutes allotted. Much 

comment has bean heard around the 
campus concern i ng the fait that contes 

t.uiis wen- allowed to dfOp back on the 

rope. However, we cannot diacuaa this 
problem here. 



Williams to Head 

R. O. T. C. Unit 



Orant '2h, and Mann '26, will be 
Squadron Commanders. 



Football Practice Starts Next Week. 



The Two Year course will open on 

October 5th this year as a result of the 
new ruling in the admin stratum of the 
Two Year course. The lengthening of the 
summer working period of the Two Year 
freshmen has been marie to allow students 
on fruit and market garden farms to com- 
plete the annual fall harvesting, thus 
emitting more practical experience for 
themselves, as well as being of more 
value to their employers. The football 
men have been asked to report on Tuesday 
September LM»th. 

Miss Marie Mercier, former chief clerk 
in the short course office, has accepted a 
(Kisition with former director John Phelan 
who is now dean of Michigan State ( ollc^c. 
The vacancy left by her resignation has 
been filled by Miss Kathryn Martin. 



fall baseball pronusea to ha Baste 

strenuous this fall than ever before, but 
also of more- general interest. A tall inter 

collegiate schedule is under consideration 

ami a Bjamc has been planned with Spring 

field for this afternoon. 

A good scjuad reported for practice 
Friday afternoon and a practice- game was 

played Saturday morning. The lineup ot 
the first team was Nash and Brings, 

battery; McVey, first base-; Redgrave, 

seiond; Moriarty, shortstop; Temple-, 
third, and Griffin, Rice, and White, in 
the garden. Davenport and Rainaull 
make up the remainder of the- pitching 
staff. Moriarty, White, Redgrave, Rice-, 
and Barnard are all candidates from the 
192S club. Moriarty was captain of the 
team and he shows much promise as a 
shortstop. All freshmen who aspire to 
baseball are urged to' report this fall if 
iiossible. Besides the games pending 
Coach Ball will hold practice sessions 
daily. 



Donah I R. Williams has been appnmted 
cadet lieutenant colonel and placed in 
command ai the R.O.T.C. regiment, 
which has bees re-organised this war so 
as to consist ol two eq uad rons of two 
troops each. Theodore J. Grant bMbeen 
placed in command ot the first squadron, 

while the- see olid scpiadron Is to |«- rom- 

msnded by cadet major Albert I. Mann. 
I he number ot troops has been reduced 

from last veai's arrangemenl ot six, in 

orde-r to utilize the- horses lo provide- the- 

maximum amount of riding. 

flu present appointments of cadet 

olln era ia .is folios 

Regimental Headquarters 

Cadet Lieut. ( ol. D. H. Williams, com- 
manding. 

('adet Captain K. W. Feseenden, regimen- 
tal adjutant. 

Cadet Master Sergeant I. W. Warren, 
reg i me n tal v-r^t. major. 

(adet 1st Lieut. C. E. Turner, personal 
adjutant. 

First S(/wi(lrt>n Headquarters 
Cadet Major T, J. (■rant, 1 ooiinatiding. 

(adet 1st Lieut. P.J. Deveapcrt, adjutant. 

.Continued on I'afte 4) 



The Associate Alumni of M.A.C. 
wish tO thank the meinhi-rs of the- 
e ollc^e- band for their si rv 11 ,-s during 

com men cement last June i>oth for the 
hand concert and alumni parade. 
RICHARD A. MKLLKN, 

Assistant Secretary. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. SEPT. 23. 1925 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Uftidal newspaper of the Massachusetts 

Agricultural College. PufaUshad tvery 
Wednesday 1>\ th« students. 



BOARD <>l EDITORS 




Maky t. ion '-••'> 


Kclit<n-iiir< 1 


lirl 


j^iin i . Lahwm "m 


MsaMlM EditOI 


1)1 I'AKTMKNT EDITOR! 




Editorial 


Makv t. lovs 


16 


Cider 1 


M \kv T. H"Vi> 


"jii 


Atlilelint 


Wll.l.lAM I.. I>". 1 


•JO 




Makoi.h L < i-akk 


mt 


Campus New* 


Raymond f. Dim.i-.y 


'27 




ll 1 sWOKIH Kaknakii 


■an 




ImsKIMIINK I'as/u \ 


'2* 


Co- Ed News 


Fun n < Isuci 


VI 


Faculty News 


Kknkst L. RfSMI n 


'L'S 




Frank j. ■onnjMHn 


27 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 
Alvin G. Stevens '26 Business Manner 

Charles P. Reed '26 Advertising- Manager 

Lewis H. Whitakeh '27 Circulation Manager 
Cham hs F. Clagc 27 John E. White 27 

Stanley N. Preston '28 

Douglas W. Loring "28 

Edwin A. Wilder '28 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



"You must l>c mistaken," die *ai<l with 
professorial firmness, "I weal to Smith. 

and I UMfj to know sonic ol the l.oys, ami 

I even, weal t<> several dances over there, 

and it was Amherst Auk'*' then." 

Will, what <an you do? Wo explained 
and expostulated and expounded, and she 
finally said. "Yes, I see" in the tone thai 
means "What an obstinate little fool you 
are." She'll end her days believing it is 
really "Amherst Aggie". 

Here's the point. If a Smith graduate, 
spending four years in our immediate 

vicinity, doesn'l know us, how can we 

expect the general public to, ever? 

What we need is an educational cam- 
paign by every member of the college. 
When you date over the river or the 
mountain, tactfully but firmly spread the 
glad news that you're from Mass. Aggie. 
When you go home, on vacation or week- 
end, aw to it that your friends and 
neighbors are set straight as to your 
educational parking place. 

Sounds like a little thing to do, doesn't 
it? So is throwing a stone in the pond. 
Hut it can stir up a lot of ripples. And 
ripples — of interest and correct inform- 
ation — are what we most need. 

We've a name to be proud of — let's 
see to it that other people know it! 




THE CAMPUS WHO'S WHO 



Entered at Mcond-clM* matter at the Amherst 
Pott Office Accepted for mailing at special rate 
•f pottage provided (or In aecUon 1103, Act of Oc- 
tober. 1817 authorized August 20. 1918. 



No More Orcharding 

Another of our cherished undergraduate 
pastimes has gone the way of the roister- 
ing Arena scraps and the moistly-disci- 
Hining pond parties. Orcharding is no 



To 1929 

You freshmen have been welcomed so 
many times already that still another 
greeting may seem an anti-climax, but as 
the copy-books tell us that sincerity never 
stales, we most sincerely add our welcome 
to the class of 1929. 

Freshmen, you have an interesting (we 
will take the instructive for grantedl) 
feries of experiences in store for you. 
This is a small college, and as such has a 
distinct personality. It is a friendly 
college: it has a tradition that no man 
shall pass his fellow students unhailed 
and alone. We have less of the collegiate 
*'misfit" problem here for that very 
reason. 

It is a pleasant custom, this campus 
"hi" of ours, and, Freshmen, it is up to 
you to cherish it and pass it on. For, 
more than you realize, the fate of the 
traditions passed on from many genera- 
tions of Aggie students is in your hands. 
You are tradition in the making — your 
actions today become the memories of 
tomorrow and the customs of ten years 
hence. You have a great responsibility, 
for on your standards of fair play, of 
scholarship and friendliness, depend the 
tone of the college that will be Aggie in 
the years to come. This is true of every 
Freshman class; and if every class in the 
past had realized its responsibilities and 
acted ac cord i ngly, we should have today 
an institution only a little less than 
perfect. They did not; but you can. 
Again thawing from the copyl>ooks, 
verb. sap. 

Of course, this matter of campus 
greeting is a very lit tie thing; but it shows. 
like most little things, the way the wind 
blows. However, we did not intend to read 
you a lecture when we started out on 
this welcome. What we meant to say 
was: that we are very glad to have you 
all here, and we hope that you will be M 

ready to cooperate with us as we are 

ready anil eager to co-operate with you. 
The teams need your 1 ackirtf — if you can't 
pbv) you can always > til! The activities 

nctd your support — they exist for youi 
benefit and pleasure, and are thus yours 

to serve and he served. 

In -lion. Freshmen, we are very glad 
to -i < you. We hoi e you will like us ami 
our college, and will work with us to make 
this the best year in the entire history ol 

MAC 



more 



"They Say—" 

(Being a symposium of the remarks of 

those present at the first assembly of the 

year.) 

The old place sure does look natural. 

1 suppose the old place looks pretty 

natural to you? 
It sure seems natural to Ik- back, doesn't 

it? 

I had a wonderful summer, thanks, 
He says he had a wonderful summer. 
Oh yes, it was a wonderful summer. 

Look at all the Freshmen. 

There are lots of Freshmen this year. 

I hear there are a lot of women in this class. 

There's Prexy! 

Is that the President up there? 
Yes, that's Prexy up there on the plat- 
form. 

It's good to be back, isn't it? 
Yes, isn't it good to be back? 
Yes, isn't it good? 

It is good! 



-CP- 



The evening "date" which wended its 
way from Lover's Lane through the 
pleasantly laiden boughs and thence 
down past Cold Storage and the grapes, 
will in the future have to rely exclusively 
on its own fruit. For the apples are 
"verboten". The pillowslips of the future 
will hold nothing more interesting than 
pillows; the bowl on the table will no 
longer bear witness to the owner's con- 
suming interest in Pomology. The orchard 
is to be fenced — some of it already is. 

From the college view-point, the 
ethical viewpoint, and the honorable view- 
point, this is well. But what fun the Frosh 
are going to miss! They will never know 
the precarious joys of exploration after 
dark, with a small flsah-light and the 
hopeless hope that this time you won't get 
the tree with the small sour apples. And 
the thrill of hearing the watchman's 
alarm, just as you find the big tree with 
the good ones, and you have to drop 
everything and go down the hill with 
strides that would make the seven league 
boots look like a two-year-old's first 
tottering attempts to navigate. 

The students never meant to really 
steal those apples — "Just these few won't 
Ik- missed; if we didn't take them they'd 
fall and rot anyway." Conservation, 
delicious satisfying conservation — that 
was the student's justification for the 
occasional acquisition of a few choice 
pippins. But outsiders came in, and the 
apples went out — by the barrelful, and 
so now we will meet the local pome only 
in pie and the wholesome sauce. Sad, sad! 
For the information of the graduates, 
and those among the student body who 
have not yet attained to the heights and 
made the discovery for themselves, we 
will add that the barbs on the wire are 
strong and as efficient as a full hour tpiiz. 
t >h well, WC never did care much for 

apples anywayl 



Introducing 

PROF. WALLACE F. POWERS 

Professor and Head of Department 

of Physics 



Amherst Aftgie? NO! 
I met a woman this summer. 
You did too? ('I course! This is ad- 
mittedly a t rick opening to start your eyes 

down the column. I he big idea lure 
really is important. 

This particular woman was a college 
professor. And a Smith graduate. 

Said we, "Oh, then you'll know QUI 
coll< '_ e \ ass. Agg ie. 

Sod -hi , 'Why . I don't believe I 
when is it ?" 

v\t 



ALUMNI NOTICE 

The Alumni Secretary announces that 

World Aggie Night will come this year on 
Friday, Nov. 13. A radio program, prob- 
ably somewhat more elaborate than the 
one that proved such a success last year, 
will l>c broadcasted from station WBZ. 
The program is not yet completed, nor 
are the arrangements for the several 
class reunions that are to be held on that 
date. 



Speaking of Assemblies — 

In many ways it was a refreshingly 
different assembly. We are always being 
told that we should never base predictions 
exclusively on past experience, but we 
always forget; in this case we lost nothing 
more serious than our reputation as a 
foreteller "being as how" the opening 
hymn was neither "Faith of Our Fathers" 
or "The Morning Light is Breaking". 

CP 

It's too bad there isn't a Beatrice Fair- 
fax column attached to this paper. Then 
we could ask her this: Dear Beatrice: I 
am a freshman at M.A.C. The sopho- 
mores and the Senate tell me that I must 
not go up and call on the co-eds, but the 
President says I should. At least he read 
us a poem called "Youth in Arms" and 
then told us very emphatically to embrace 
our opportunities while in college. Now 
Beatrice, you are a wise woman, and I ask 
you, Beatrice, what should a poor Frosh do? 
However, there ain't no Beatrice, so 
we will have to figger it out as best we 
can. If you're really doubtful, you might 
ask a sophomore! 

CP 

Frivolous Suggestions 

No. 999. Watch- word for the year: 

Ingersoll. 

CP 

Oh Yes 
Scene — the Freshman Reception. 
Frosh (to another of them, looking at 
the tag)— Boston, huh? Know Jim 
Smithers? 

Second Verdancy — No. Where you from? 
(Looking at tag.) Jonesville, huh? Know 
Tom (iordon? 
First One — No. 

Silence, while they look over the co-eds, 
who are gathered in a defensive formation 
in the center of the room. 

First One (He's the complete man of the 
world) — Not so bad. Maybe I'll give 
them a little time if there aren't too many 
good ones at Smith this year. 

The Other (this sophistication is way 
beyond him) — Cosh, do you know women 
over there? 

First One — Oh no. but it can be done. 
(Smiles wisely and glances tolerantly at 
(o-eds.i It can l>e done! 

Sieond One (Also looking.) — Say, they 
probably want to meet us as much as we 
want to meet them. What say we just 
go up i'-ml start talking to them? 

Kid Sophistication (all the starch melt- 
ing OUt of his collar at this unexpected 

calling of his bluff)— Why, I well. 1 

don't think wi say, there's a guy 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COL1.EC.1AN, WEDNESDAY. SEPT. 2.\, 1925 



AT THE ABBEY 



"In Am 
surprised. 



H'lM . 



replie 



lied, 



iniew hat 



11 



■in 



"In Amherst? 
verv ri 1 1 nt . i hen 
Amherst Aggie?" 

"Lady" we expla 
possibli "There isn't 
then never h.i- been and there never will 

In ,m\ Amherst Aggie. There is Mass. 
Aggie." 



must he soini t rung 
- ii connected with 

.-kill US. 

in d. as politely as 
any Amhei si Aggie, 



"t IT Mr. and Mrs. Frederick ('. Peters 
announce the birth ol a daughter, Jane, 
on Se| itembei '.', 1925. 

lM Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Lambert 
announce the arrival ot a son. John 
Wallace. 



We have all — graduates and ab.mt-to- 
graduates alike — fought and bled in the 
battle of physics, and either survived or 
died (one or more times!). So that 
naturally one of the big campus questions 
i, "What's the new Physics Prof like?" 
Please park yourself in imagination in 
the well-remembered seats, where every 
year the carving becomes more intricate 
and impossible to write on, and wait for 
the bell to buzz the beginning of the first 
class of the year. 

The sun is streaming in, and someone 
carefully lowers the shades. The door 
snaps open, and a man steps briskly and 
composedly into the room. In an instant 
he has taken command and issued his 
first dictum. "Put up those shades 
please." A ripple of laughter starts around 
the room. And stops abruptly. There 
are some professors with whom you can 
safely take liberties. And some with 
whom you can't. It would have been quite 
as safe t» tell Prof. Hasbrouck not to call 
upon you because you were bashful about 
speaking in public as to laugh when Prof. 
Powers sees no occasion for laughter. 

Attentive silence, then, reigns. The 
professor's opening words are in the nature 
of a bomb-shell. "Physics" he announces, 
quietly but emphatically, "is a hard 
subject." (Please inject here mournful 
glances of "Ain't it the truth?" from the 
old-timers.) "And 1 intend the course 
shall be the equal of any given in the 
country." And — after catching that look 
of quiet and purposeful determination — 
we shouldn't be at all surprised if it were 
at least that! 

For the first time in the history of the 
physics classes, the co-eds are not holding 
down the front row. And some people 
who, with habitual modesty, never fail to 
seek the peace and obscurity of the rear 
seats, are prominently to the fore. Quite 
by accident! For Prof. Powers appeared 
on the scene armed with ruled papers 
ready for signing of names and positions, 
and "You will occupy your present seats 
for the rest of the term." 

Prof. Powers comes to us fresh from a 
five year sojourn at Wesleyan. Hearing 
this, a Collegian reporter said to him 
frivolously, "How do you like having 
girls in your classes, Professor?", expect- 
ing either a pained or a pleased reply. 
Instead, he answered calmly, "I'm used 
to the idea." He started his teaching 
career in Richmond College, it seems — 
which, by the way, is now the University 
of Richmond. That was, in a way, co-ed. 
What they call a co-ordinated school, in 
which the men and women are like oil 
and water in a glass— together but entirely 
separated. That is, they were in the same 
school but in different classes. 

After that. Prof. Powers taught in the 
University of New York which comprises 
a little bit of everything in the world, 
including co-eds; and after that, he had a 
class with nothing but women students in 
it, as instructor in Simmons College. Yes, 
he probably SI "used to the idea". 

Well — perhaps his classes will have a 
hard year of studying. But it will also be 
an interesting year. And— if we're any 
guesser — an energetic year. From purely 
superficial observation, we should hazard 
a guess that laziness is the one thing he 
doesn't hate anything else but 1 

Just to complete our introduction, we 
will ako tell you that he has a perfectlv 
good working sense of humor. Now do 
you feel as ii you knew a little more about 
"what the new prof is like"? That's nice! 



Last Wednesday afternoon the so; 
more girls invited the entering girls to tat 
Abbey Center, where they explained t,, 
them the rules by which they arc 
govern their conduct during their free*. 
man year. This year the rules have I 
changed considerably; the most import, , m 
change lieing that the freshman girls w, , ir 
their green bands two weeks instead 
whole month as in previous years. Also 
the policy of assigning one or two fresh 
men to each sophomore as a special can 
is being tried out. The rule that tain- l„ 
worn after the green bands are taken 
has been abolished as it did not meet with 
the approval of the sophomore girls. 
M 



Directly after the mass meeting of 
last Thursday evening the freshman girl- 
were given an entertainment in the 
Abbey Center by the House Association 
of the Abbey. After the dancing and a 
marshmallow toast the girls gathered 
around the fire to sing. 

M 

Miss Mona Add shea d of Auburn, Mass., 
has registered at M.A.C. as a special 
student in Floriculture. 

M 

The first Y.W.C.A. supper of the 
collegiate year was held Sunday evening 
in the Abbey Center. Several of the 
women faculty of M.A.C. attended. Miss 
Skinner gave a little talk to the girls on 
the forming of good habits which would 
improve and strengthen their lives. Some 
of the girls spoke on what they had been 
doing during the summer and it was very 
interesting to hear of the many different 
things which have been occupying the 
time of the Aggie girls. 

M 

This year there are so many girls in 
the Abbey that rooms have had to be 
made of the basement floor of the house. 
At present there are about ninety girls 
rooming in the dormitory ; several two year 
students are expected in October increas- 
ing the number to over one hundred. 



CAMPUS NOTES 



The loss of the cavalry barn by fire early 
in the month will result in no interference 
with the riding schedule of the R.O.T.C. 
unit. At present the horses are kept on 
the picket line at the rear of the jumping 
park, where they will be cared for under 
emergency arrangements until plans for a 
replacement of the barn can be carried 
into execution. 



The Floriculture Club will hold its first 
meeting of the term Thursday at 7Js 
p. m. in French Hall. Floriculture 
"majors" in the junior class are invito]. 



Tune 



in 



on 



WBZ 



The Hairy Cattle, 1 >airv Products, and 

General Live Stock Judging teams are 

the first to represent the college this 

year, in judging contests. The inter- 
collegiate contest in dairy cattle and 
general _ live stock judging, open to the 
Eastern States and Canada, was held at 
the Eastern State- Exposition last Mon- 
day and tie Intercollegiate Dairy Pro 
ducts Judging contest was held the follow- 
ing day. The results ol this contest will 
be available for the next issue of the 
( I 'I II (, i v\. 



over there looking for me. See you later 
Tea Minutes later. 

Both Frosh (to new acquaintances) — 

That guy over there':' Oh yes, I know him. 
He's a dumb floor-mop. 

Moral — Don't spread a line until you've 
been at college a I least three years. Don't 

then. 

CP 

Drippings from the Press 

Statistics -how that there is a growing 
tendency among the students of eo-edu- 
cational colleges to pre-graduation en- 
gagements and post-graduation marriages. 

Could you call such couples "Co- weds "' 

Paris style note- -a\ 
to lx 
us o 

"That's a keen looking tie you have on. 
I'd like a dress made out of th.it. 

A hot argument frequently give- rise to 
cold look-. 

CP 



ALUMNI NOTES 



that dress* l are 
(Mil -hotter this whiter. Reminds 
the girl who said to her caller 



And that's that 



•is Mr. and Mrs. Kyrle Cray Johnson 
announce the arrival of Patricia Anne on 
August 2nd, 1025. 

124 John G, Read and Helen Grout 
ex'25, were married this summer and are 
living in Am her st . Mr. Read is teaching 
in the Amherst High School. 

■21 Kenneth S. Loring and Hate! 
Logan ex'25 were married on August 15, 

1025. 

'2d Morton H. Cassidy and Charlotte 
Sheffield were married August 15, 1036. 

'25 George Hanecomb is doing land- 
sea^ work with a realty company in 
llrodia. 

'U.-. Robert J. Templeton has a posi- 
tion with a landscape company in Pitts- 
burg. 

•J.") Charles F. Oliver is teaching agri- 
culture in the Westport High School, 
Westport, Mass. 



Friday, Nov. i 3 



foi 



World 



Aggie 



Night 




IlERE you can find everything in the clothing line as well as complete stock of SPALDING 
* * ATHLETIC GOODS. You are not really "in college" unless you are outfitted in the 
recognized fashion by Walsh. It pays to Walsh-ize. Ask the College leaders. 

THOMAS F. WALSH 

College Outfitter. 



Greetings- 

May we extend to you the service of a 
store thar*always has the latest in clothes 
for the College Man at the lowest prices. 
We shall jbe pleased to show you at any 
time. 



F. M. Thompson & Son 

Clothes for College men for over forty years 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



{The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



Bostonian Brogues this Fall! 

Don't mistake it - the Bostonian Brogue is the 
shoe to wear this Fall. 

Bostonian Brogues were designed to fill a bill 
and that bill is the loose fitting trousers that 

are so popular. And that's why Bostonian Brogues 

are the shoes to wear this Fall. 



BOLLES SHOE STORE 

BOSTONIANS FOR COLLEGE MEN 



Cross-Country Schedule 

Announced 



large Number of Veterans Assure 
Success in Difficult Season. 



With a lar^e si|tiail ol I tot h veterans 

ami novices practising regitUrty, Conch 

Derby is practically assureil ol a WfCCSS 
fill crOM country team this fall. Heading 
the list are ('apt. Hart left, Nottehaert. 
anil Wheeler of the varsity, Preston ami 
I orest of last year's freshman team, ami 
a number of other men who showctl their 
worth last season. A very difficult schedule 
hasUen prepared by manager J. Kmerson 
(ireenaway '27, including meets with all 
the members of the "Little Three". The 
season opens Oct. 9, with a race against 
Rhode Island State at Kingston, ami 
reaches its climax Nov. lfi, when the team 
will enter the New England Inter- 
collegiates at Boston. 

Fall track also has a goodly number of 
aspirants, including Capt. Sniffen, who 
looks better than ever, and Hall of last 
year's freshman team. These two will 
probably be the principal point-scorers 
this year. An interclass meet will take 
place soon, although the date has not 
been definitely decided. 

The varsity cross-country schedule 
follows: 
Oct. 9 — Rhode Island State at Kingston 

17— Williams at M.A.C. 

21 — Wesleyan at Middletown 

24— W.P.I, at M.A.C. 

30— Amherst at M.A.C. 
Nov. 7 — Boston Univ. at Boston 

16 — N. E. Intercollegiate* at Boston 







SHckheadworh 

Getting the right tailor, trailing 
with the right crowd, keeping 
the "profs" properly complai- 
nant all come under this heading. 
But a tousled, untidy mane and 
dandruff on your "tuck" collar 
are always bad form. 

OeStkaJ • bottle of "Vaieline" Hair 
Tonic and uainf it regularly keeps the 
scalp healthy and makes stiff hair look 
silky. It prevents dandruff and puts on 
the finishing touch of slick headword. At 
all drug stores and atudent barber shops. 

Evtrj ' ' Vautint ' ' arWarf it rtcnm ■ 
mrndtd tvtrywhtr* ktcamii »/ in 
abitlmli purity and iftclivtniti. 

Vaseline 

sto u s fat err 

HAIR TONIC 

For the Health and 
Appearance of the Hair 

Chesehroufh Ml* Company (Cons'd) 
State Street New York 



A LARGE ASSORTMENT 

Smart Styles in 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 
$5.00 to $12.00 

HOSIERY TO MATCH 
50c to $2.00 

THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 



275 High St 



Holyoke 



FOOTBALL SQUAD 

i .iiitintu-d trom Page I) 
rbomptOB, Hit » ie. Ki.li.mlson 

Milyai.l.il) ,,|,, Moberi 

Dili, M.lhonex 

rhh, Quian 

rob, Mart 

II.. I lac. I I 



WMGLEY5 

AFTER 
J EVERY 

MEAL 



The Kingsbury Box & Printing Co. 
Northampton 





I~ ^J ^\5^\ affords 

■/rv\ \ benefit as well 

■* \.A.<* «■ pleasure. 

Healthful exercise for the teeth 
and a spur to digestion. A long* 
hating refreshment, soothing to 
nerves and stomach. 

The Great American ■ 
Sweetmeat, untouched 
by hands, full of 
flavor. 



PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABEL LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 
Mills Studio Phone 456R P.O. Block 




TRY 

C. H. GOULD 

for first class 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

13 Pleaaant Street Amherst. Maaa. 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Memorial Hall, 

M.A.C. Athletic Association, 

Academic Activities, 

The College Senate, 

Track Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Football Association, 

The Collegian, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Roister Doisters, 

Musical Clubs, 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-six Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-seven Index, 

M.A.C. Christian Association, 

p ublic Speaking and Debating, 



Richard Mellen, Asa't Sec. 
Richard Mellen, Manager 
C. S. Hicks, General Mgr. 
Frank P. Rand, Manager 
Lawrence L. Jones, Pres. 
J. E. Greenaway, Manager 
William L. Dole, Manager 
Francis W. Warren, Manager 
Mary T. Boyd, Editor 
Donald R. Williams, Manager 
Preston Davenport, Manager 
H. H. Warssam, Manager 
Harry E. Eraser, Manager 
Myron Smith, Manager 
Kenneth W. Milligan, Manager 
Roy E. Norcross, President 
Raymond Smith, Manager 



Telephone 

17&-J 

176-} 

403 M 

110-X 

8314 

8325 

17Q 

066- M 

647 M 

69 M 

280 

280 

170 

8314 

8326 

8325 

300 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE NEEDS 

FOUNTAIN PENS EVERSHARP PENCILS KODAKS 

FILMS VICTROLAS VICTOR RECORDS 

Tooth Brushes, Hair Brushes, Dentifrices, Lotions, Sodas, 

Smokes, Candies, Lunch. DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

— JACKSON & CUTLER^ 



DEALERS 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



IN 



READY TO WEAR 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND CLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST <\ DEAC ON. props 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 

Hooks of all Kinds, NCw or Standard 

Die Stamped Stationery in Cold or Maroon 
1029 Numeral Stationery - Fountain Pens and Pencils 
I oose Leaf Note Books Theme Tablets 



Everything 

the new 
student needs 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

IN THE M BUILDING 



Pens 
Paper Supplies 

Stationery 



SING LEE "AND LAUNnav 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mass 

f)ur I iiin.lt > First Clasa 

Our I'olky c;uaran». e d 
REPAIRING *M> All. KINDS OP 
W W..M. DONE AT RKASOnU'!: 

Oppoalte P«at Office 



TLair^A Citt W*2 take great pleasure in welcoming back the upper classmen; and in extending our greetings to 

i ney re viii — the class of 1929. 

We offer for your approval a FALL LINE OF CLOTHING that can not be beat. Drop in and let us prove it. 

CARL H. BOLTER 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. SEPT. 33, 1925 






Town Hall, Amherst 



YE AGGIE INN 



Thurs. 

3.00. 6.4S 
H..M» 



KUhurtl Harlhelemess .null 
Mary Hay in 

•NKW TOYS" 
from ihe Htufte hit. I«'»j| 
Dirk.'* Hrsl comedy role and| 
Is juHl an funny ate ll can be. 
Sewn Comedy 



Friday 

3.00. 6.45 
8.30 



Florence Vldor, MaU Moon-. 
Harvey Myer» and Louise 
l'.i/t ml. i In 

"GROUNDS KOK 

DIVORCE" 

a si.U-splii I ini> comedy from 

(he Broadway snccesn. 

Spurillulii Comedy 



WE HAVE THE MOST COMPLETE LINE OF 

Banners, note books and all other necessities of the student. We carry 

(QUALITY) Waterman, Conklin, Parker and Chilton Fountain Pens. 



(SERVICE) 



Saturday 

3.00, 6.45 
8.30 



Mon. 

3.00 6.45 
8.30 



ConKtance Talmadfte In 

"HRR NIGHT OK RO- 

MANCK" 

Connie'* nlfllest, zippiest 
pepptent show. 

News Comedy 



James t.'ruze'ti production 

- 1 iik hkc;c;ar on 
horseback" 

wiili KxiherRaUlonand Ed- 
ward llorton. For fun and 
fantasy, »>l«e of selllnfts, 
novelty story and mattlcal 
camera effects. It has them 
all hacked off the SOWSSs. 
I'alhe Review ( omedy 



175 FRESHMEN 

(Continued from Pafte I) 

Hunter, \V. (.onion South Sudbury 
Huss, Miriam II. 

jolmson, Alice I-. 
Johnson, Clifton K. 
Jones, Janet M 

Join's, Leroy O. 

Kane, Mary C. 
Kav, John K. 

Kelteher, Edmund I. 

Kclli -y, < harles K. 

Kinney, A. Footer 
Kingman, Harriet C. 



Newton Center 
I lolilen 
Worcester 
Amherst 

< .reenfieid 

llolvoke 
Jamaica I'lains 
West Koxbury 
Dalton 

South Hadley 
Natick 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WI'IH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUNS1NGWEAR and MEDALIA 
SILK HOSE 

BIO ASSORTMKNT OK THE 
I.ATKST SCUMS AT 

$1.00 $1.39 $1.75 

G.Edward Fisher 

R. C. Ames -"Bob" 

DKI'KNDABI K 

' " Watch. Clock, and Jewelry Repalrlntl 
» .. > ; 

' „, »., Corner Hallock 

46 KteaMant M. 

1! y | ' J0. R Opp- Amherst Laundry, 

tT S. S. HYDE 
!' Optician and Jeweler 

,!, 3 PLEASANT STREET (up one fHfthtt 
OcuTlst- Prescription- Filled. Broken len.es 
■ - accurately replaced 

A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Wait 

NEW PRICES 
Men's Whole Soles. Rubber Heels - - - »{•»- 
Men'. Half Soles, Rubber Hee U - - »•" 

Men'. Rubber Soles. Rubier Heels "_ 

Men's Half Soles — 

Work Gitaranteed-AMHERST HOCSE 
Open till 8 P. M . 

THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

Full Line and new stock of 

Tennis arid Golf Supplies 

Come in and see them 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



( ■ardner 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Shirk) 

Auburn 

Florence 

Peabody 

Hyde Park 

Westminster 

Holdea 

Haydenville, S.C 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 
35t a * fe*aSSL Stare 



Kreienl aum, Roman A. Bridfewater 
Kercutt, Henry G. 
Ladas, C. P. 

I.ain-. Thomas I".. 

Lincoln, Margaret 
Love, Elisabeth P. 
Lyman, Warren II 
Macione, Augustui 
Manchester, E. 1>. 
Mansur, Paul B. 
Marsh. Kendall H 
Marl. Willis II. 

McKay, Catherine. M. NeartooviUe 

Mi Kit trick, Kenneth F. BostOO 
Minsuk, Henry G, Brooklyn, N 

Mills, Taylor M. Boston 

Morrison, I.eaonardW. Monson 

Morse, Emily A. Waban 

Murphy, Charles l>. Hadley 

Nash, Kohlev W. 
Newell, Tlorine E. 
Nichols, Edward II. 
Nickerson, Ral| h F. 

Nitkicwicz. Hole-law 

O'Leary, William 
Pat hard, Faith L 

Parker. Louis A. 

Parrish, Ruth II. 
Paulson, J Edward 

Lease, llolton S. 

Perkins, Esther J. 

Perry, Kenneth \V. 

Phinney, Wm. R- 
Plumer, P. Raymond 
Lo//i. Joseph J- 
Prouty, Karl C. 
Raaney, Perry S. 

Raphes, Harry K. 
Rayno, Carlton ( •. 

kees, Robert D. 

Regan, John M. 

Reynolds, Arthur R. 

Rice, Louise T. 

Rich, Kenneth M. 

Richards, Lawrence E. Dalton 

Robertson, Wm. B. Port Cbester, VS 
Rooney, (harks L. 
Kowe. Miriam L. 

Rudquist, B. J. 

Sat Kent, Carmata L. 

Sargent, L. E. 



CERTIFICATES GIVEN 

(Continued from Page 1) 

from the cottage. At the meeting of the 

Academic Activities Hoard, however, it 
was decided to award the members of the 
various judging teams with attractive cer- 
tificates attesting that the student has 
been a member of a certain judging team 
or teams. These certificates will lie signed 
by the president of the college and the 
coach of the teams These certificate- 
have been ordered and will he sent to the 
following member* of last year's judging 
teams: 
Leland L. Currier 



ALingion 
Westboro 
Montpeher, Vt. 

Attleboro 
1 lolyoke 

Northampton 
\\ indoor 
Ashby 

( '.reat Harrington 

llolvoke 

Hampden 

Easthampton 

Holliston 

Willimansett 

Adams 
North Adams 
Mittineague 

Ashheid 
Agawam 

Oilheiiville 

Newtonville 

Amherst 

Florence 

( , reenfieid 

Maiden 



Preston J. Davenport 
Irwin S. Sheridan 

Dudley dek. Sprague 

Samuel F. Cordon 
Loren I". SnitTen 
( '.. Harold Thurlow 

Frsncia I. Bean 

Joseph Cassano 

Charles F. Oliver Jr. 

< iilbert Simpson 
Edwin L. Tucker 

Herbert F. Bartfett 

Andrew W. Love 



Dairy Product- 
Dairy Cat tie 
Dairy Products 
Dairy Cattle 
Dairy Products 
Livestock- 
Dairy Products 
Dairy Cattle 
Floriculture 
Floriculture 
Floriculture 

Livestock 

Poultry 
Poultry 
Poultry 

Poultry 

Fruit ' 

Fruit 

Fruit Packing 

Dairy Cattle 

Fruit 

Fruit Packing 

Fruit Packing 

Livestock 

Livestock 

Livestock 



< pening .1 sa nu arr w ir nl of s 
MODERN SHOE REPAIRING SHOP 

uith the latest ami most up-to-date 

Goodyear System Machinery. 

Ml mrk «g«rmnteed, only high prwfe leather wwl 

Moderate Price*. I """• i" and l'»>k over my mop 

Labrovitz block 11 1-2 Amity St. 

VINCENT <;R\NI>ONICO. Prop. 



Wc always carry the most up-to-date 
COLLEGE SHOE 

TO SUIT KYKRYBODY 

Watch out uindow display — Hosiery a 
Specialty 

JOHN KOTOS 
sfi.f'sfr mck shoe stork 

COLLEGE SHOES 

— AT — 

TOWN PRICES 

PAGE'S SHOE STORE 
Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the best in everything 



S ev r es* , Harvey \\ . 
Sheridan. James W. 

Shockro, Harold J. 
Shutnan, Ernest C. 
Si vert, Glad) s L. 
Slack, < •race G. 
Smith. Bessie M. 
Smith, John M. Jr. 
Snell. Robed S. 
Soper, Carol) n C. 
Southwick, Walter K. 
S| ii s, Naomi J. 
Stanisiewski, Peter 
Steere, Phillip B. 
Stcinhugler, F.liz. A. 
Sullivan, John A. 
Tarr, Roy S. 
Tcllt. Yolney 
Thayer. Fred D. Jr. 
Tidd. Douglas II. 
Tompkins, Karle A. 



(luster Depot, Vt. 

Bottoo 

Dorchester 
Shrewsbury 

( '.reenfieid 
( '■reenfieid 

Yo o ker s , N. Y. 

Hadley 
Maiden 

Worcester 
All-ton 
Amherst 
Hernardston 
Southbridge 
Shetbtime Tall- 
Clinton 
llolvoke 
Amherst 

Chepachet, R. I. 
New York, N. V. 

Medford 

Gl ouc ester 

Ashby 

Shrewsbury 
Taunton 
Easthampton 



Samuel W. Lunt 
[Emily G. Smith 

Gordon II. Ward 
[Sumner 0. Burhoe 

Edward F. Ingraham 
.James C. Kakav.i- 

MANY CHANGES 

(Continued from Pufte 1) 

Mis> May E. Foley has been appointed 
extension assistant protestor of home 
economics to succeed Miss Mildred Wood. 
She is a graduate of Michigan Agricultural 
College and has received the degree of 
Master of Arts from Columbia University. 
She has previously served a- assistant 
alumni secretary at the Michigan Agri- 
cultural College. 

Dr. Frederick R. Butler has been ap- 
pointed instructor in chemistry. He is a 
graduate of the Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute and received the degree of Ph.D. 
from Harvard this June. 

Mr. Luther B. Arrington of Florence. 
has l>een appointed instructor in floricul- 
ture. He is an Aggie graduate and has 
been connected with the A. J. Canning 
Nursery Co. and with the Harvard Hotani- 
cal ( '.aniens. 

Daniel J. Keane has been appointed 
assistant profes-or of Military Science 
and Tactics. 

( Mher appointments are: 

Paul Keller, in-tructor in Cernian. 

George F. Shumway, instructor in 
Mathematics. 

Malcolm K. Timey. instructor in Physi- 
cal Education. 

Warren D. Whitcomb, a— i-tant re- 

■earch protcs.-or of Entomology. 



Tourtcllot, C. Sampson Providence, R.l. 



Birthday Greetings 

and 

Carols for all occasions 



Trevett. Moody F. 
TuftS, Helene M. 
Yartanian. Dekran 

Venter, Charles F. 
Walkden, Charles E. 
Walker, Seth L. Jr. 

Ward, Stuart H. 
Warner, Helen L. 
Weaver. Dana 0. 

White, Lawrence H. 
Whittcn. Russell R 
Whittle, Doris E. 
Woodbury, John S. 
Young. Clarence D. 
Young, Fdward H. 
Zielinski, John B. Jr. 



I 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



Milford 

Jamaica Plains 

Springfield 

Millers Falls 

Swansea 

Amherst 

( ireenfield 

Williamstown 

Shelburne Falls 

Amherst 

Melrose 

Worcester 

Fitchburg 

Springfield 
Springfield 
llolvoke 



WILLIAMS TO HEAD R.O.T.C. 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Cadet Staff Sergeant C. A. Fraser, wrgt. 
major. 

Second Squadron Headquarters 
Cadet Major A. I. Mann, commanding. 
Cadet* 1st Lieut. A. W. Jones, adjutant. 

Cadet Staff Sergeant H. H. Worssam, 

sergt. major. 

Troop .1 
(apt. James Bower 
1st Lieut. Marvin W. C.oodwin 
2nd Lieut. K. L. Tucker 
1-t Sergt. Leo C.albraith 
Troop B 
I apt. Raymond H. Spooner 
1st Lieut. A. 11. Doolittle 
2nd Lieut, Loud 
1st Sergt. Albertini 

Troop E 
(apt. A. B. Hill 
1st Lieut. C. W. Nichols 
2nd Lieut. Samuel Cutler 
1st Sergt. Bruorton 

Troop F 
Capt. William T. Stopford 
1st Lieut. P. H.Couhig 
2nd Lieut. H. R. Otto 
1st Sergt. Ford 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



Do College 

Students Read 

Advertisements? 

If you do, surely you 
imll read this one 

One fine day a Sophomore from a leading Univer- 
sity came to see us, suggesting that we advertise in 
their undergraduate paper, and best of all convinced 
us, and this is how he did it: 

Firfl — He believed in Life Insurance because his 

uncle (a good business man) had advised him to 

buy some. 

Second — His Father died in the prime of life and 

good health and left almost no insurance, when 

he could have carried $50,000. 

Third— He also knew that he could buy Insurance 

NOW at half the annual cost his uncle and 

Father had paid for theirs. 

All this convinced him that even though a student, 
he should take out as much Life Insurance as his 
allowance would permit. 






m 



«»i 



lift 

tt 



What About You? 

Every college student looks forward to a career, 
which will make possible the fulfillment of the most 
cherished desires — surely Insurance is a necessary 
part of this program. 

Insure, in part at least the value of your educated 
self, NOW, making up your mind to increase it as 
business or professional success follows. 
The John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Com'' 
pany issues all forms of Life Insurance, endowments 
for home and estate protection, mortgage replace- 
ment, education of children, bequest or income for 
old age; also annuities and permanent disability. The 
John Hancock is particularly interested in insuring 
college men and women and obtaining college grad- 
uates for the personnel of the field staff. 
If you have read this advertisement, 
you 'will aid your undergraduate 
paper by communicating with the 



"Life Insurance Company* 

or Boston. Massachusctts 
197 Clarendon Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Over Sixty Yean in Business. Now Insuring Over Two Billion Dollar* 
in Policies on 3,500,000 Live* 



a 



,,, x -- _J ! ,, 



^B B ! e HAT? U ^S5! S r^ CLOTHING HABERDASHERY OF DISTINCTION 
Custom Tailoring = - 1 Headquarters for College ^en 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



Styg mafiHarinwtta QlnUgntatt 



Vol. XXXVI. 

PIGSKIN HAS 

INITIAL TRYOUT 

raesn in Fine Shape for Opening 
GaflM at Lewiston. 

Memberi <>f the football team had then 
in-i tests of outside opposition last Sstur- 
,l,,\ when they journeyed to Hartford to 
m i uimiage against Trinitj in i pre season 
pine Each team was given the ball for 
g certain length ol time, so no definite 
i, lotti w er e scored. Init the Aggie warrior* 
returned in good phyatcal ihspi from the 

i r ,!\, no further additions l>eing made to 
da' hospital squad. 

•pick" Fessenden i'ii, a promising 
candidate for the line, iui> returned from 
ih, infirmary whan he wa> confined si ■ 
result of breaking a small bone in his u^. 

II,. will be UBabk to take part in any 

icrimmagtng lor at least two weeks, how- 
ever. "Tommy" Thompson l's. who has 

|,i i ii doing n <KM ' work in the l>acktield is 

out ot the game for some time also on 
account ol ■ dislocated knee. In a recent 

pra c ti ce session "Spike Malley 'L'7, nib 

ititute end, had the misfortune to throw 

OUt hit knee 

Fortunately then- i- ta sibundaaec of 

I ,,| . 1 1 .It- lecond string men who are making 
strong hi<ls for all the positions, especially 
in the line where new men are taking the 
|,l,ms of the three regular linesmen and 
HI strong substitutes who graduated last 

|unc. George * otton '22 ia coaching the 
line this fall, succeeding Robert Mohoi 

L»:i. Cotton was a regular tackle of no 

» abDHy on the 1(120 and IvSleteveas, 
captaining the latter. Mis 192] team, after 
a rgtner hectic schedule of wins and l< tses, 
triumphed over Tufts in tiuir linal game 
BCOre of 14 to U OH Alumni I ield 
i Ms team, dubbed the "Wnite Rats" 

because of toe white jersejs they wore 
ilnring their games, was the last Aggie 
n.mi to score a win o\t>r TuftS. Cotton 
has been line coach at Woburn High 

School since his gradual ion iVom M A.( . 
,iikI has 1 i en instrumental in turning out 
urn it the best teams thai Woburn has 

eve had. 
I a-i I riday evening the ilood lights on 

ihe athletic field were used for the first 
nine this season, and now that standard 

time is once more in effect, they will lx- 

Med regularly. On Friday morning at 
8 o'clock a large ■quad, consisting of at 
two full teams of men physically tit 
to play, will leave by bus and automobiles 
!or Lewiston, Maine, where they will 
met Bates on Saturday afternoon in the 
opening; clash of the season. Hates has 
already played one game, having defeated 
Lowell Textile, and will be anxious to 
•Test revenge on the Agates for the I'.i 
U) I, defeat administered to them on 
Alumni T ield last fall. 

The freshman team, coached by ' Ed" 
luniey 23, is putting in a strenuous week 
is preparation for their first game of the 
■easoa, which comes here on October .'ird. 
Their schedule is not yet complete, but 

tbar opponent* on Saturday will be 

Northampton High School. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 30, 1925 



No 2 



CUTS FOR UPPER 

CLASSES 0NLY\ 

1927 Receives Cuts for First Time in 
Campus Career. 



No More Boards 

For Abbey Boarders 

"Walking the Plank" to be Campus 
Pastime No Longer. 



Since there seems to be some question 

in the mind ot the student b.xlv concern 
ing the cut svstcm, following is the ■) stem 
U approved l>\ the Dean's ollu e. I 01 
freshmen and sophomores, no cuts are 
allowed and all absences must be cm :u«ed 
by the Dean's office. Tor seniors and 
juniors, ten percent ( uis arc allowed. I hi 
to the greater than ordinary length ot this 
fall term, the benefit ol the doubt is given 
and .lasses occurring three, lour, and tiv 
times | week are allowed lour, live and 
MX CUtS percent cuts a term. r« spei t iv el.y 

but classe* occurring one and two timi^ ■ 

week, are still allowed onU the ctistoniarv 
one Of (WO cuts per term. 

The Deans osSce advises thai students 

do not use their cuts to satislv persboa' 

whims or conveniences, lot, in ease of 

illness and more than the specified ten 

percent ol cuts taken, lbs student cannot 

expect tO hav c the pre-, iotis i in s cancelled. 
Therefore each student should keep ac- 
count .1 his cuts by (decking up with the 

Dean's oitu c frequently. And it is well 

for students to tile excuses to' , lt l\ abseil, e 

whatsoever in the Dean's office. 



MANY FRESHMEN ENTER 
COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

Fourteen Competitors Indicate Keen 
Interest in Publication. 



1HURL0W TO HEAD 
FLORICULTURE CLUB 



Prof. Muller Talks on his Work at 
First Meeting. 

A meeting of the Floriculture Club was 
bflrl last Thursday evening in French Hall 
it which the following officers were elected 
Iw the ensuing year: George II. Thurlow 
-'lit West Newbury, president; Karl \\. 
"niorton '26 of Reading, vice-president, 
a "'l Raymond E. Smith '20 of Manchester, 
swretary-treasurer. Professor Richard T. 
natter of the department of Floriculture 
pre a very instructive and humorous 
ta 'k in which he brought out some in 
ferettiftg facts about his work this past 
s "nimer. His work included visiting green- 
snuc establishments along the Hudson 
Klv er and on Long Island and compiling 
'"formation for a horticultural trada 
msctory which is to be published by e 
**• York concern. 



The freshman competition lor the edi- 
torial board ol the CotXBGiAX started very 
successfully last Monday evening. Then 
wen- fowteen competitors present st the 

first milling. Several others were unabl. 
to attend but will be on hand next week. 
This large number khowi thai there is an 
unpreceudented amount oi enthusiasm 
among the memberi ol the freshmaa class. 

T'roin these contest. nil s then i^ every e\ 

pectatioo t.iat there vvdl be found some 

who have unusual talent in the line ol 
newspaper •• ork and who win be assets 

to the COU.KOIAN as well a- to tile College 

Among the fo ur teen fresomen who re 

ported, six oi them were co-ed-. There is 

every indication that the struggle for tne 
survival of the fittest will be excecdi;) Iv 
keen. The freshmen who repotted ate as 

follows: Charles S. Cleaves, W. Got don 
Hunter. Edward H. Nichols, Hotton S. 

I'ease, Win. K. Phmney, Lawrenc" E. 
Richards, T red I). Thayer Jr., Douglas 
II. Tidd. bine L. Bartlett. Laura Batch- 
elder. Margaret Lincoln, Elisabeth P. 
Lane, Louise T. Rich, and Miriam L. 
Rowr. 

The call for sophomore com p e t itors has 
not been issued but it is expected that 
win n the call is made tnat an unusually 
large number of contestants will report 
and attempt by earning positions on the 
l>oard to uphold the present standard set 
by the das*. 



The souvenir shelf in the library will 
soon be enriched by a historic splinter 
from that famous old relic, the Abbev 
Boardwalk, lor years the standard plank 
in the reformers' platform has been "Out 
with the planks"; and now an official 
decree has been issued that the boards 
must go, and cinders come to take their 
place in the boarders' shoes. The danger 
ou- days ot speeding against the tenth 

stroke of the chapel clock, with the terrible 

rosace that ten to one the boards wouid 

• i.nk and precipitate the runners prone 

on the ground on the WTOnj side of the 
door are over. One can nuke much better 
time on a cinder track anvway. runners 

say. 

From now on, visitors wearing high 
heels may approach the dormitory in 

safety, and the Grounds Department 

men can lay aside their hammers and 
naiU and extra boards (made, if their 
la-ting quality b a criterion, ol solid tissue 
paper I, lor the new song about t he campus 
is "The Cinders are coming, hurrah, 

hurrah." 

"C. E." DOESN'T MEAN 
CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR 

Camp Knajerog keeps Football Men 
Out of Mischief During Su turner. 



Aggie Judging Teams Do 

Well at Eastern Stat. * 



Smt 



SIXTEEN MEN ADDED 
TO GLEE CLUB ROSTER 

Freshmen Predominate Among New 
Men. Rehearsals Begin This Week. 



As a result of the try-outs held laM 
week, the following men have been added 
to the roster of the (.lee Club: I'hilip N. 
Dow I'll; Donald lane, Walter M.mx, 
Robert Owers "28; Tram is Albert i, 
Matthew I.. Blaisdell, Wil.iam \).w . 

George B. Flint, Martin Fon s cc a , '-. B. 
Gordon, A. II. Graves, Richard W. 

i, lover, Irving P. Ilotclikiss, Tayloi 

Mills, E. Richardson, and Settett 'lmi. 

Ml those who were members last yeai 
are automatically ret lined. 

Rov Noieross 'L'li is aeain leader ol the 

club, and Harry E, Fraser L'li is manager. 
Prof, Ivan GorokhOsf of Smith College 
will continue as coach. Rehearsals begin 
this week, and will probabk be held twice 
a week throughout the term. No definite 
schedule <>l concerts has been arranged aa 

vt. 



J. A. Crawford Leaves 

Extension Service 



Faculty Members 
Transferred 



Phillips and Yount Join Experiment 
Station to Work Under Purnell Fund. 



v arsity football schedule 

Oct, :{— Bates at Lewiston 
l'i— Norwicn at M.A.C. 
17 — C.A.C. at Storrs 
-M— W.P.I, at M.A.C. 
•'^ I— Amherst at Pratt Field 
Nov. 14—1 .owell Textile at M.A.C, 
Tufts at M.A.C. 
26— Springfield Y.M.C.A. 
College at Springfield. 



Mr Arthur W. Phillips, who served 
during the past year as an instructor in 
the department of Chemisrry and whose 
places is now being taken by Dr. Freder 
ick R. Butler, has been transferred to the 
department of Dairying of the Experi- 
ment Station. He is now engaged in re- 
search work in Dairy Manufactures under 
the terms of the national Purnell Fund. 

Mr. Hubert VV. Yount, former instruc- 
tor in the department of Agricultural 
Economics, has been transferred to the 
staff of the Experiment Station. During 
the past summer Mr. Yount has been en- 
gaged in research study concerning the 
Massachusetts apple industiy. This work 
is organized under the Purnell Fund and 
is organized as a project covering all New 
FIngland. The studies outline the fact 
that the complete industry of New Eng- 
land in the production of the best quality 
of apples is as good as that of any apple 
region in the country. It is hoped through 
facts developed in this study to be able 
to bring about definite means of building 
up a flourishing apple industry. Miss 
Jefferson who is also connected with the 
department of Agricultural Economics has 
been engaged during the past summer in 
the same work. 



The "C. K." that Held Coarli ' Ki T 

Gore wears on one ol his sweaters si ill 
mystifies some members el the student 

body. Tin-, monogram is the "letter" ol 

('amp Enajerog, the Aggie chief mentot 
boys' summer camp at I she Rapoada, 
Wilmingtom, \ ermout. 

"Ki I" (.ore- tnts add an M.A.( . 

atmosphere to the (imp, for all aie 

familiar figures on this campus. The 

"head cook and bottst washer" was Joe 

Hilyard -7. lie kept in condition lor the 

fall workout b\ raising early a- til (nod 
bakers do, ami by slinging hash to (lie 

"Kid's" hungry charges, Another vain 
able aassstant was ' aptaia "Larrv " Jones 
'ur>, whose most conspicuous ac hi evement 

was developing and salislying radio bugs. 
I he Imiss farmer was "Al" GustafsOB '-(>, 
who managed the camp farm ol 170 a, nM 
However, his most arduous duties were to 
milk and <are for the herd of cattle, one- 
head in all, and to amuse "Pork" and 
"Beans", the camp swine, and "( .corgc", 
a pet lamb. Of course this trio kept in 
football form, ta demonstrated bv the fact 

that part of the camp orTutmcwts consisted 

of a regulation goal (>ost and a forward 

passing target. 
"Red" Ball '21, baseball coach, also helped 

and Fee Dutty '2.">, the camp secretary, 
supplied much comedy. A good time wa- 
had by all. 



Will Serve as Reporter for a Cleveland 

P a p er . 



Ihe resignation ol Mr. John A. Craw- 
ford '30, who has been Extension Editor 
at M.A.C lot iiearlv two years, hat been 
. nnounced, .u\<\ goes into effect officially 

en Septl mb'T (hi) I i, I h. Mi. ( i.iwlorcl 
leaves to take a i>osition on October l-'tb 
as reporter on the Cleveland I 'lain Dealer, 

a will known Cleveland, (Ohioj news 

paper. He left the college last Saturday. 
His resignation from the- Extension Stall 

will be keenly teh because ot his goed 

record and valuable serviecs as reportOT 
ol all extension news. 



THAYER ELECTED PRESIDENT 

OF FLORICULTURE SOCIETY 



Head of Floriculture Department 
Honored at Buffalo Convention. 



Noted Professor 
To Lecture Here 



Professor Clark L. Thayer, head of the 
department of Floriculture, attended the 
lorly lir-t annual convention ol the 
Society of American Florists and Orna- 
mental Horticulturalists which was held 
in BulTaloon August lKth, I'.Hli and 20th. 

He wan elected president ot tin- College 

florists' Section, an organization which 
includes those members of t , ( . national 
sodety who are engaged in educational 
and invest ignttonal Wf>ri\ in l'c»ric nil lire, 
and also those members who are college 
graduates or former student- and are- now- 
engaged in practical work. At present 
Professor T aayc T is secretary of the 
section but he will be succeeded in Itt20 
by Stanley W. Hale 'Hi of the depart meat 

of Floriculture at the- Univ. of Illinois 



Prof. Otto Rahn to Talk on Various 
Dairying Subjects Next Month. 



A series of lectures are to be given by 
Professor Otto Rahn of Kiel, Oermany, 
during the week of October "> '.) inclusive 
at the college here. 

Professor Rahn is a professor at tin 
University of Kiel. A short time age. he 
spent about ten years in this country for 
the purpose of studying. During this tour 
he has lectured at Cornell Universitv. 
University of Wisconsin, University of 
Illinois and many other colleges through 
out this country. He speaks claasical 
English very fluently in spite of the fact 
that his native tongu ■? is German. 

There will be one lecture eacn day at 
11.00-1 1.50 a. m. in Room Iff, Flint 
Laboratory, and one at 4.^0-5.30 p. w. in 
Room 26, Gocssmann Laboratory. Th 
morning lectures will consular the practi- 
cal subjects of the theory of dairying am 
the afternoon lectures will be devoted t< 
ihe- discussion of the underlying scieiitin 
principles involved. 

The subjects to |je considered are. 
Monday — 

a. m. — The ('ream Line. 

p. m. — The Rising of Cream. 
Tuesday — 

a. m. — Milk Foam and Whipped I 

p. m. — Milk Foam. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



TWO APPOINTED TO 

EXTENSION STAFF 



Cook and Parmenter of Dept. of 
Conservation to Work on Forestry 
Project. 



Dairy Catilo leant Finishes Sec ^33 
and Dairy Products and (it-n T.^ 
Livestock Teams Finish Third. 

Massachusetts Aggie's judging le 
made a good ahowiag al tan Eaatera 
states Exposition last await, tne Dairy 

Cattle Judging team winning second 

place and Danv Products and General 

I i estoc k teams scoring liuul. 

In the dairv eat lie contest the- team 
coni|M.seel of DaveniK.it '20. Maim '2ti, 
and Williams L*ii, finished second, only 
1 wint v points behind the leaders, IVnn. 
State. Ten teams entered into this con 
list and iheti final i, inking was as follows: 
I'eiin. State. :W7f>; StasS. Aggie, .l.f.V.; 

Maim-, :i.uii; (ormdi. BgfjT. Maryland, 
3282; Rhode Island. .* i»0.i . ( ounce 1 1, m. 
3240; New [erasy, 3 loo; Syracuse, SlfiO; 

New llampshit,-. .Kill. Davenport held 
fourth place in this contest; Williams, 
twelfth place-, and M.,nn, sixteenth. 
Mass. Aggie- had the- high team oil (else- vs. 
Aggie's team finished third, sixteen 
points behind Cornell, in the- othci eon 
lesl which iik In. led the- judging ol bee I, 

cattle, horses, a h e ap , ami swim-. Pasta. 
Stan- also won this contest, leading her 
nearest opponents b) .'l_'l points, in this 

contest Fnuun Was -ixlh man; Tucker, 

eleventh; Palmer, twelfth; Warren, twen- 
tieth; ami Greenwood, twent) ascond. 
Tucker received the highest ■ >>i am 

man in the- contest in tne judging of 
Ileuses Besides the medal won bv 

tucker, there wen- aw. mis amounting t>» 
in < ai h prises. 
I ii< same Dab*) lodging- team will 
represent the college in the i ontest al tin- 

National D.iiiv Show al Indianapolis, 
October tenth, and the- Tat Stock Team 
will compete al the International Live- 
stock Exp os it ion al Chicago In Dece m b er . 

In the Dairy Piodu, is Judging, eontest 
live samples each of butler, cheese-, milk, 
and ice- cream were- judged. The- live- 
teams in this contest scored as follows, 
with Aggie holding thiol pla,e: CoSSSat 
tie lit. 283.00; I'ennsylvania, 2'.»li.7."); 
Massachusetts, .{20.2."); New I lainpshirc, 

328.2S; Maine, 446.75. Under the- sys- 
tem ol graeling used, I h<- team having 
the lowest tCOre won tirsl place. The 
Aggie team missed winning first place- in 

judging ie< cream by ,7fi point. D. R. 

Williams won First place- ami a gol.l medal 
in juilgini. 1 butter. On all pro ducts Un- 
learn membeis hni-hirl , t > sOSSOWSi D. R. 
Williams, sixlh; W. K. Bu.lg.-, eighth; 
and A. I. Mann, eleventh. These men 
WOO a total of forty I've dollars in cash 
prizes. 

This same- team will leave- lor Indian- 
apolis on October eigntli to take- part hi 
the- inli-Molle-iaii cOUteSl to In- held at 
the National Dairy Show, Octobei I2tn. 

M.A.C. Live Stock 

Win Many Prizes 

HOMS, Cattle and Hogs Carry Off 
Honors at Fair. 



Harold O. Cook, chief forester, and 
Robert B. Parmenter, members of the 
Massachusetts Department of Conser- 
vation, have l>een appointed to the ex- 
tension staff of the Massachusetts Agri 
cultural College, to de ve l o p and carry out 
a project on farm forestry. They will 
devote part of their time to advising 
woodlot owners in developing their pro 
perties to a state of maximum prixluclion. 

Far-sighted utilization of farm woodlots, 
tne college authorities have concluded, is 
one of the most profitable agricultural 
enterprises. Particularly in New lOngland, 
.vhere lumber is high, does foresight in 
timber cutting prove valuable. With 
Acstcrn lumber, which comprises the 
• >ulk of the supply in this state at pre -.cut, 
telling for from $7/j to .fitOa thousand feel, 
iastancea have been found where farmers 
srbo have cut their woodlots ludicrous!) 
a period of years, have been able to 
cut timber, haul it to the mill, have it 
(Continued on I'ajte 3) 



M.A.C. made a notable showing in live 
stock at the Taste-in States T. hibition, 
winning a number of first and ,, •, ond 
pii/.es, with Pen heron horses among the- 
leaders. The- first prize- and e hampion of 
stallion Pen nerons was won by Ravsla 
lion, first prize stallirm foal was awarded 
to Bay Stale- Me Duff, with Bay State 
General holding fourth pi hat in tnis entry. 
In the entry for five year o Id man-s. Dope's 
Primrose held first Otace, Daffodil's Bell 
won Second place among the four year old 
mares, and Daffodil's Oiiee-n also won 
second in the entry for two ve-ar olds. 
Bay State Lily won first prize in yeailing 
mares, with Bay State Rose holding 
second plae e-. 

In the cattle- exhibit, the first prize in 
two year old llolstein heifers was won by 
Fay ne Rujwrt Countess. Tnird place in 
Ayrshire! was won by Alia (rest King- 
leader in the two year old bull class. Alta 
(rest Ringleader had been pr e c e ded by 
Alta Cram Happy (.o Fuc ky, who was 
champion at the Maryland Stat.- fair. 
Two Snort Horn Heifers were placed 
seventh in classes of twenty-four and 
eighteen n-s|H-c lively. 

Several prizes were won on Berkshires, 
tne herd being p re ceded only by that of 
Kite and Son-,, famous breeders of St. 
Paris, Ohio. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. SEFE. 30, 1925 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 30, I9?5 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the MMMM *•*■* li 
Agricultural CoUcft. PuMtobad avarj 

W.Mlnesday by llie ttudtBta. 



HOARD 01 


EDITORS 


Makv t. lev* 11 

Jqhn F. Lamhi-.ki 9fl 


Kditor-inrCI 
MamiKiiiK I'-d 


DEPARTMENT BOITOM 


Editoikil 
Cider Press 


Makv T. BOVB 
Makv T. lOIB 


Athletics 


Win 4AM L. D« 1 

llAKOI.Ii I- < l-AKK 


Campus News 


Raymond F. 1)1111 v 

KllsWORIII Baksakij 

JdSI-.l'IIIM. l'ANZICA 


Co-Kd News 
Faculty NfW 


Fram n < Sauca 

KkNKsr L. Si-im ik 



2(i 

■98 

•27 

••2K 
27 
•2S 
'2K 
27 
'2S 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 
Alvin 0. Stevens '26 Business M;.na K er 

Edwin A. WUMtll Advertising MMMH 

Lewis H. Whitakkk '27 t ire illation Manager 

t John E. Win if. 27 

Douglas W. Lokin<; '2s 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
PostOrhce Accepted (or mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in section lltB, Act of Oc- 
tober. 1017 authorized August iU, 191*. 



Traditions 
Aatac preaenl acltod yaai opeww find 

thai several of the College CUatOOM of |>;i>t 
years h.ive Win oveilookc.l 0C ilii-cont in- 
„,(|. Of eour.se many of these changes 
naturally fall in line with the humane 
teuilt nev in eolleges thrOUgbOttt the 

country. TWi altered attitude <>i college 

men is commendable, lint everv college 
has many traditions that are quite whole 
some and which help to tie together all 
the members of tDC college, from the men 
of the past who stalled them to the men 
Of the future who were expected to pass 
them on. 

Two of these traditions in particular 

have come to our attention this. fall. 

Thej may seem relatively unimportant to 
some but they have been ■ part of the 

college ami their discontinuance will do 
much to weaken the strong tie whicli at 

present unites the graduated members of 
MJV.C. and those vho arc now enjoying 

the privileges of this institution. 

The in -i id the traditions to which we 
an referring is a custom which, even in 

recent yeara, hat been written into the 
rules governing the sixty-man rope pull. 
In years past a contestant was required 

to maintain his rel.itive position on the 
rope or drop out altogether. If he was 

drawn to the edge ol the pond he must 

suffer the consequences. 1 he object in 
holding the tug across the pond was that 
the losing t lass should go through. We 
cannot sic why that custom should be 
discontinued. 

The other tradition concents class 
numerals. It is the policy of athletic 
Committees of MAC. tO prevent college 
litters and class numerals from becoming 
too common and therefore to maintain a 
certain distinction for the wearers ol 
them. For two years the sophomore class 
has appeared on campus with the class 

number on ever) hat. Although everyone 

must realize that these numlx-rs on the 

class headgear have not beea earned oa 

the athletic held, still we believe that this 

display of "27V and "28V has taken 
some of the distinction from the earned 
numerals. 01 course we do sol advocate 

junking the present hats but we wish to 
point out to the student body the oversight 

that has been made by the designers of 

class hats in hope that future classes will 

canfiiliv respect this .tradition which was 

obviously estabhahed for well-grounded 

reasons. 

W. I.. D. 



which crystallised the sentimental inanity 

ol the period, ami set the songs to mu-i< 
adapted mainly from I .erinan drinking 

i, These songs they sang lustily, and 
passed i hem oil as a urn iou> heritage when 

tins left. So future generations ol -t u- 

,1, nt-. with the reverence which we 
alwaye accord to old things simply be 

caute I Im \ ife Old, kepi on singing them. 

\i w colleges sprang up and Copied I he 

old songs, style, ami in most cases, tune, 

so that now the college song is .is stan- 

dardiaed as breakfast bacon. Something 

about "our Alma Mater dear" ami "our 
fair college", something about "bright 
college years" ami "to you we'll e'er be 

true." Football songs with adm onis h- 

mints of "light for the old college" and 
"Never give in" and "trash through <or 
smash through or otherwise demolish' the 
foe". And so on. 

Most of it is applesauce. Made from 
sour applet at that. I'.ven our own best 

song, with its Hashing crescendo ol 
"Massachusetts", degeaeratee into a mere 

goal bleat if not sung with energy and 
discretion. We do very little in the wav 
ol singing now. A little at mass meeting-. 
,i little at assemblies anil at football 

garaee. The ciaae sings are virtually a 
thing of the past. That is understandable 

—it is hard to be enthusiastic about IDOSl 
Of the songs, at least to t hi extent ol 

practicing them over and over again, as 
a -ing requires. 
They offered u> ■ priae for ■ new song 

last year. How main went into that 

competition? ( hse, p erh a pe ? 

What's the answer.'' We don't sing the 
old songs, ami we won't write new ones. 
Anil still college singing continue- to be 
an important factor in college community 
life. What- wrong.' We give it up. You 
tell us- you, the student body and I hi 
alumni. Sit down some night mm>ii and 
write us your reaction to the situation. 
in as many or U few words as you choose. 

Ihr Cdi.i.i-.i.ian offers you ■ column for 
aae in this dtacussson, and will be glad to 

hear from anyone — and everv one! 




THE CAMPUS WHO'S WHO 



A COLUMN OF 
CASUAL COMMENT 



AT THE ABBEY 



The English Slanguage 

Every now and then some one led me- 
ns OH our misuse of the glorious Kngh-h 
language. They always wind up their 
lecture- With the horrible warning thai 

some day we will and our se lv es in a posi- 
tion requiring the use of the clearest and 

purest l-.ngli-h. and- borrow of honors 
ut will have n<> resource but slang on 

which to draw. Moral: talk by the book. 

DOn'1 take those lectures too seriou-K. 

Speaking pun- Engtisfa i- all very well in 

plav-, in classrooms, and in theory: but 

il von do it in real life you are apt to be 
regarded as a stilted prig. At least, while 
voti are ol college age. And when you are 
so regarded, you lose in fun and friend- 
ship*. Abo, in spite ol the lecturers, it i- 
amazingly true that when you really want 

good English, you have it. Probably you 

unconsciously -oak il in while reading. 
Anyway, it's there. Isn't that so? 

There is no use in telling us not to use 
slann. We do, and we will undoubtedly 
keep right on doing it. but what we 
shct'ld do is this: vary it. When a word or 
phrase begins to appear in the funny 
papers and in vaudeville and on the lips 
of everyone from the banker to the street 
cleaner— drop it and find something new! 
Theoretically at least, we who go to 
college and graduate from college are the 
possessors of traineil minds, and you can't 
train even a worm by letting it wiggle in 
only one direction all its life. 

The Inglish slanguage? Yes, by all 
means. But don't use carbon COpy 
slanguage. 



"When Do You—" 

Dear I reshmen: 

For the next three years you will spend 
the next three summer v acat ions answer- 
ing the following three questions: 

"Where do you go to college?" 

"Oh, isn't that nice! 1 ><> you know Jim 
Whoosh)? I think he went there." 

(lie didn't. After half an hour's fren- 
zied searching of your whole list of college 
acquaintances, il will eventually transpire 
that Jim went to Oshkosh Seminary. But 
never mind— there's another question 
coming. I 

"And when ilo you graduate?" 

You'll always get that one. After the 
first few thousand times — and don't let 
the people who will tell you tnat the first 
hundred times are the hardest fool you!— 
you will get very tired of telling the tin- 
adorned truth. And so — to put a little 
pep and variety into ■ stale situation, and 
to help you pail out your line, which along 
in your Junior year will run so thin that 
you won't be able to hang even an evening 
gown on it. we have kindly arranged for 
you the following song, which you can 

.i to all inquirers with, a- the soap ads 
, "relish ami profit". 

Sing it to the tune of "That's How I 

Need you." The piano player at the 

movies will know how it goes, if you don't. 
I. allies and gentlemen, we present for 
yOttT approval today the new and -cinti- 
lating ballad entitled: 

That's When! 

When class room chairs have pillows, 
When there are no morning chapels 
When plums grow on the willows. 

When they tell us "I'i.k the apples", 

When the co-eds all have long link-. 

Win n the I teen's Hoard- OUt of date. 
When the 100s come to me in Hocks, — 

That's when I'll graduate! 

We require BO royalty fees and assume 

no responsibility for the use of this 

effusion. 

Your- very truly, 

The Cider Prese. 



1. About Dr. Torrey 

There's no doubt alxjut it — times ain't 
what they used to be! Freshmen no 
longer chart the complication- of Cult ha 
palustris, and Sophomore- no longer peer 
dazedly into the bewildering mazes of 
the "phloem of T ilia". And no longer 
are the specimens of local flora picked and 
pressed in 1XW or thereabouts dusted off 
and presented as of current vintage. For 
Dr. Torrey has drawn all the botany 
pictures himself— the students only have 
to go to the bookstore and say "Botany 
pictures please". And — there are no more 
required herbariums. Sic transit, etc., 
etc. 



"Buy a Brick." 



On next Saturday, the girls' athlct;, 
council, represented by four member 
and accompanied by Professor Gfi 
will make a trip to Mt. Toby, to eJsOO 
a site for a cabin which the girls at 
planning t.r bmld in the near luture. 



2. And Prof. Click 

Prof, (.lick's children still know how to 
find a ball which has been lost in the 
middle of a large held by running in circles 
until they step on it. Speaking of psy- 
chology, that process has no apparent 
application. Many minds have run in 
circles in the Field of Knowledge without 
discovering a -ingle Jthing' 



At a house meeting held at the Abbey 
last week, Kuth Putnam 26, Margaivt 
Smith '2(> and Frances Bruce '27, vers 
eiected to the "Buy a Brick" committu 
This committee is to investigate the high 
price ol bricks and to ascertain now soon 
a new walk can be built to repiace the 
present un-atislactory board walk. 



Marguerite Bosworth, Dorothy Drakt , 
Evelyn Davis, Elisabeth Pomeroy, Elsie 
NickereOB, Ruth Putnam, Margaret Shea, 
and Marion Cassidy, aT '26, attended tlu 
exposition in Springfield, ist week, 
demonstrating in the Home Economic 
booth. 



"Buy a Brick." 



.*. And Dr. Peters ' 
Question: If you see a Ford piloted by 

a man wearing a bland Shakespearian 
smile, and il the wheels of that car are a 
bright and cheerful red, — who i- it? Ye-. 
yOU are right. It i-. 

4. And Dr. Manna 
The week's beat gossip (authenticity 
not guaranteed). 

Scene: Mr. Ilanna- oltn e. with Mr. 
Ilanna sitting in the office checking over 
I-' reshmen list- and seeing that, as lar a- 
he had anything to do with it, everybody 

was happy. 

Enter a Freshman, cap on head at the 
extreme gravity-defying angle that only 
a Freshman can accomplish. 

Mr. Hanna: Good morning. Anything 
I can do for you? 

Froth: You're the man who wee that 

we get anything we Bead, aren't you.'' 
Mr. Ilanna: Why: ye-, as far a- I can. 

What can I do for you? 
Froth: Gimme a cigarette. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



-CP 



Evolution Aftain 

This takes all the prizes for the year's 
wont Stupidity. A recent press dispatch 
-,iv - that one Mr. Kundred of (.o.-hen, 
Indiana, well known in the world of 

floriculture for the many new varieties ol 

gladioli which he has bred and introduced 
to the market, ha- been put out of the 
Goshen church by the righteous elder-. 
They allege that the said Mr. Kundred 
hat gone against the expre— wishes of 
the Lord, and therefore is not fit to lie a 
Church member. Tor, say they, if the Lord 
had wanted ruffled or otherw i-e spe ci a lised 
gladioli, He would have made them that 
way Himself! 

Wouldn't we like to hear Dr. Torry talk 
to the elders for hall an hour or so! 

CP 



5. And Prof. Anonymous 

A statistical professor announc. - that 
there were 9,901.6 llie- to every clas-rooin 
on the campus during the last two weeks, 
or enough, if laid end to end, to circle 
the earth once every twenty-lour hours 
with plenty lelt over for all the F.nt. 
i la— e- to practice on, and that, further 
more, he wisl.e- they would. 



College News to 
Be Well Covered 

Springfield and Boston Papers will 
all have Correspondents. 



In Line With the Above — 

"Congressman to introduce bill abolish- 
ing evolution." 

— sVsSsipaeer Headline. 

These rabid reformers will never be 
satisfied until the Ship of State is making 
at least fifteen "nots" an hour. 

CP 



Why SinU? 
Back in what lift calls "The Gaj 
Nineties" the public taste was somethinj 

for the shade of William Morris to wee> 

over. Eminent ritisens with muttonchoi 

whisker- built fat intistai i'.-colori d boua 

trimmed .mi! scalloped and tortured with 
mantrads and lav window- and cupolas 
and -crol! -aw fretwork. They put iron 
deer and cute little iron rabbits painted a 
naturalistic whin- on the front lawn. 

Thej had little colored !><>>>. also of iron. 
at the horseblock, (which was of stone 
with the owner's name or initials taste- 
fully i arved on it to hitch horses to. 
i.\ preposition IS a bail thing to end a 
.sentence tntk. Heard th.it one?) 

And the gay college boy, with his side- 
burns and Sowing whickers, WTOtC tongs 



FRIDAY NIGHT DANCE 
The last Friday Night Dance of the 
a aeon was held in Memorial Building last 

week, and was marked bv a large atten- 
dance. The music wa- furnished by tne 
Con D'Or Orchestra (Moon Multin's 
Melodious Music Masters) whose scin- 
dilating strains kept the dancers on their 
toes throughout the party. The chaperons 
v.eio Mr. and Mrs. A. W. I hiliips. 

I he into; mal < ommittee is planning to 
run a scries of Friday night dames and 
t lans air also under wav for an Informal 
on the afternoon of the Tufts game. 



INDEX NOTICE 

The last opportunity tor undergraduates 
to secure copies of the 1926 index will be 
given this coming Friday. Business 
Manager Myron N. Smith will be in the 
Memorial Building from ; till 2 o'clock on 

Fid iv afternoon and will have charge of 

the distribution. Vfter tnat date no 

copies will be obtainable. This notice 
concerns members of the tnree Upper 

classes only. 



Drippings from the Press 

The best hot weather story we garnered 
thi- summer was that of the New Yorker 
who, after Ining greeted for the fiftieth 
time by "How is it — hot enough for you 
today?" replied desperately, "It's not the 
heat, it's the bromiditv." 

We see by the papers that the cute little 
flowers and faces and animals and things 
that have been the latest word in ho-ii rv 
decoration are to be supplanted by a 
newet fad. TatOOCd designs are to be the 
chic decoration among the -artonally 
elect. In the future, the 'n— ons learned 
at Mothers knee may be tastefully illus- 
trated! 

Comes a time (yes, we have been to the 

movie- 1 in the life of every Freshman 
when In wonders if the milk of human 
kindness it even Grade I I 

CP 



A press correspondence group, consi-t- 
ing of students and faculty of this college 
and two townspeople, has been formed, 
and will cover the news of college for 
several Boston and Springfield newspapers. 
These corres|>ondents will Ite glad to re- 
ceive any items of interest in connection 
with the college. The following are their 
names and addresses and the papers 
which they represent: 

Associated Press — Belding F. Jackson. 
Stockbridge Hall. 

Boston Herald— Belding F. Jackson. 

Boston Post— Ormand C. Street, East 
Experiment Station. 

Christian Science Monitor — Prof. Ralph 
A. VanMeter. French Hall. 

Boston Transcript— VAmvr F. Barber '26, 
Kappa Epsilon. 

Springfield Republican — Elmer E. Bar- 

ber '26. 

Boston American — Ernest L. Spencer '28 

<s:i Pleasant Street. 
Boston Tweeter — Mite Josephine Pan- 

Eica '28, Abigail Adams House. 

Boston Uiobe — Mrs. C. J. Fawcett, 70 

Lincoln Avenue. 

Springfield Republican — Mrs. C. J. 
Fawcett. 

«?p ingfidd Unum—Mn. C. P. Jones. 
8 Nutting Avenue. 



Well Nough 

A farmer who started to plough 
Said "The one thing I cannot allough 
Is to have -ome bea-t- work 
While the re-t of them shirk." 
So he went out and hitched Up the cough! 

CP 

And that's that! 



Professor Abbott Resigns 



Prof. John B. Abbott, extension pro- 
fettor of agronomy at the College, has 
resigned in order to enter the serv ice of 
the National Fertiliser Association. Prof. 
Abbott ha- been in the Extension Service 
lor five years. During this time, his 
major concern has bet n the lel'ounding ol 
dairy farming in southern New Fngland. 



'.is Sensual W. Wiley received tin- 
degree of Doctor of Sc i ence from Wash- 
ington College last June in recognition of 
his attainments in the held of industrial 
and agricultural chemistry. 

"(Ml A. W. Morrill has been appointol 
consulting entomologist to the Mexi. u 
Department of Agriculture. 

'ol John W. ••rig; recently mceived 

both first and second prizes in the secoml 
annual exhibition of landscape architec- 
ture at the Southwest Museum, Lot 
Angeles, lir-i award was for a cainpu- 
plan lor (he College of Agriculture, Davit, 
California, and second award was for i 
plan for the Citrus Ex|>eriment Station, 
Riverside, California. 

HI Edward J. Burke, recently with 
the Veterans' Bureau with headquartir- 
at Burlington, Vermont, has accepted the 

iKJsition of agricultural instructor 

Smith Academy, Hatfield, Mass. Afto 

graduation at M.A.C., Mr. Burke t.r 
agriculture for one u-ar in Minne-ui: 
lb wat appointed the first full-time in- 
Btruetor ol agriculture at Hopkins A 
em\ at lladliy in I'.Ul, and continued in 
that service lor over right years. In 
January 1090, he entered the Rehabilita- 
tion Service for returned soldier- U 
organized at MAC, and was later trail- 
ferrcd to the field service. 

'12 Everett J. Baird has been granted 
patents on I feeding device for poult'rv. 
covering the idea of sliding a feed pan inn. 
I collapsible cage. It is now being trio! 
out by Professor Banta of the cefhft 
poultry department. 

lti Leon C Beeler now living in 
Hi I ■suad is ■ salesman for "Rayon" silk 
products. 

'20 Mr. C. W. Scott resigned his peti- 
tion as teacher of agriculture at Sander- 
son Academy, Ashfield, taking tffect 
July 1, 1925. Mr. Scott was one of tht 
first graduates of the agricultural depart 
meat at Ashfield. He has gone into tht 
commercial field. 

'20 Mr. Flavell Gifford, recently prin- 
cipal at Harwich High School, is no* 
principal of Smith Academy at Hatfield. 
'21 Charles F. Russell closed his ser- 
vice at the Brimfield Department on 
August 30, 1986. He has accepted an 
appointment as principal of the high sdw 
in Kent. Connecticut. The BrintfieM 
Department of Agriculture has been 
closed by vote of the town. 

'22 Harry J. Talmadge, recently in 
■tractor of agriculture in Smith Acadcnn- 
Hatfield, began service as County Club 
Leader in Ikrkshire County on Sept ' 

1995. 

S.i Mr. F. Earle Williams h 
placed Mr. Herman Nash '17 at Ashfu'l'i- 
Mr. Williams was principal at Cummin;. 
ton two years. 

'24 Mr. Leon A. Regan, a grad 
the Norfolk County Agricultural SchW 
who entered M.A.C as a special student 

in 1920, bttt was transferred to the ««* 

plan and graduated in 1924, i- r 

a successful teacher in the High School* 

[obnton, Vermont. 
'24 Arthur C. Nfcoll leaves the B 

boro High School and goes to Mot 

Vermont where he will teach t! 
subjects in the high school there. 

•Jl Russell Noves has just begun 
second year as principal of the Wil'" 111 ^ 
ton. Vermont, High School. An*JjJ 
visitors in Wilmington during the sum"* 
heard very high praise given Mr. v 
for his service in this school. 







CONSULT "TOM" FOR ALL YOUR COLLEGE NEEDS 

We always have complete stocks of CLOTHING and HABERDASHERY as well as IPAUNNG 
ATHLETIC GOODS, FOUNTAIN PENS, ORLIK PIPES, Etc. WHITEIIOISE and HARDY 
SHOES. Pressing and Cleaning All hand work. 



For these cooler days— 



A Leather Windbreaker in 
brown or grey at - 

A Flannel Blouse in plaids and 
checks - 

A fancy pull-on Sweater 

A heavy pure worsted slip-on 
or Coat Sweater in V neck or 
crew neck styles - 



$12.00 

$5.00 to 13.50 
4.00 to 10.00 

8.50 to 12.50 



F. M. Thompson & Son 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



he Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



Bostonian Brogues this Fall! 

Don't mistake it — the Bostonian Brogue is the 
shoe to wear this Fall. 

Bostonian Brogues were designed to fill a bill 
^and that bill is the loose fitting trousers that 
are so popular. And that's why Bostonian Brogues 
are the shoes to wear this Fall. 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 

BOSTONIANS FOR COLLEGE MEN 



NOTED PROFESSOR 

Continued from 1'ufte I) 

Wednesday — 
a. in. — Churning Process. 

p. in. 1 henry of Churning. 

Thursday — 

a. m.- Structure ol Mutter, 
p. in. Structure of Butter. 
I riday — 

a. in. I'hysico chemical Cheese 

Problems. 

p. m. — Physical Chemistry ol Milk 

Heating. 

The tubttaace of these lectures is lar 

reaching and hears pertinently not onl) 
upon physics, chemistry, and dairying, 
but upon biological problenu as well, food 
subjects, and other natters. Conference* 

will lie availa'le at appointed times. 

Students, membera of the various >taits, 
ami in.- general public are invited to 

attend. 



TWO APPOINTED 

(Continued front Puge 1) 

Sawed, and haul it hack to the larin at a 

cu-a ot around |10a thousand board feet. 

While the market for native pun is 

discouragingl) tow now, Hr. Cook fore 

sees tin- tun. w lit n New I upland titnliei 
will .main hriiiK a good p. i.e. The Wes 

tern supptj which is being exploited and 
diminished so rapkll) is rxpected to last 
hanllv a dec. uh ■ at the present mte si 
cutting. Ten yean eeacc errofdiag t<» 

Mr. Cook, the i.iiinei who h.is thinned hi- 

wooiilot when cutting '"ei, ami maintained 
.1 tuirly clean forest to permit maximum 
growth, triO own a decidedly good property. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

EXHIBIT AT EXPOSITION 



Because the main theme ol tin V.1--.1 
cnutettt Building at the Exposition w.i- 
devoted to vegetables, the Home Eco 
aonuct Exhibit demonstrated the use of 
vegetabh - in th. diet. Each .lav a menu 
was served which constituted the baste of 
i dinner, showing the various uses i<>i 
vegetables. A> far at wat possible, the 
vegetal I. ■ used in this exhibit were raised 
in Maatachutetta A model ketrhen, with 
.ill modern equipment wat .1 part «.l the 
exhibit. Eignt ghit from the Home 
Economics Denartment went down to the 
Exposition during the week to tab part 

in the demonstration . 



NORTHAMPTON 
ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

PALL HANSKI.I.. M«r. 

Week of October 5th 

Tbe Northampton 

Repertory Company 

IN 

Mr. Pirn Passes By 



BY 
A. A. MILNE 



BvSSUSSjS at HIS Sat. Matinee at 2.1.S 

PRICES: 11.10. 85 & 50c Incl. tai 

Phone, 4.t5 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 



275 High St 



Holyoke 



SHOES 

AMI 

H o s I e R Y 

of Quality and Fashion for 
M. A. C Students 



ALUMNI NOTES 



WRIGUYS 



Women's Clubs In Fitchburg. 

2fi Ltwtei If. Holbrook he- beea 
appointed graduate assistant in agrtcul 
tui.il economics at MAC, succeeding 
Mis, Mar) I -..lev '-'i 

'L'a Charles F, Oliver began service as 
teacher ol agriculture in the new depart 

11 1*111 it West port High Scl Ion August 

!."». 103ft, 

'2fi Meivin Jack has liecii appointed 
teacher ol agriculture and science in the 
higit school at West ( harietton, Vermont, 

'25 Verne Ro be rt a is to teach mutual 
training, science, and physical training in 
the high school at Henniker, V II. 

'2') Joseph Caaaano began service as 
instructor in agriculture at Ashfield on 
Julv I, 1925, Mr. Cataaao te a graduate 

ol the I s-.i\ t oimlv Agricultural School, 

and wat the graduate to enter M.A.C 
under the new plan foi such graduates 
leading to a degree. 



AFTE* 
EVERY 




Probably one 
reason for the _,___-. 

popularity of ^^0 
WRIGLEY'S Is that It lasts 
■o long and returns such 
great dividends for so imall 
an outlay. * It keeps teeth 
clean, breath sweet, appetite 
keen, digestion good. 

Fresh and full-flavored 
always in its wax • wrapped 
package. 




The only place in town to buy 
strictly home made 

BREAD AND PASTRY 

IS AT 

DRURY'S 



Collefte orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



NEW HOTEL TO BE 

ERECTED IN AMHERST 

Lord Jeffrey Hotel to be Completed 
by Next Spring. 



\ new hotel, to l«- ii. mi. d th,. I. ,,n| 

|. Ifrey Amherst Hotel, i- to be erw tad 
in Amherst .it the comet of Bottwood 

Am nue and Spi ing Si i. el , facing Anihi i It 

Common. The building which will l«- 
colonial sivlc ol architecture, i-- t<> in- 
built of brick ami furnished according to 
the vogue of tin- time ot Lord Jeffrey 
Amherst. The new hotel will have seventy 

rtKinis lor ^ue>ts, and loil\ li.ilhs. 

I In- need ol ,iu up to date hotel in 
Amherst, betel at it i>, tin- location of 

two colleges, has long been lelt, and the 
I onl J.-lhi-v Amherst Hotel should till 

ilu- need in excellent fashion. The archi- 
tuis are Messrs, Putnam and Con ol 
Boston, and the chairman ol the building 

comiiiittr. i- Ernest M. Whit I. I he 

m w -tril. tun- i-. . v peeled to b. ic.i.ly lor 

opening hj May l, 1086. 



'26 Kit. i Case) i^ teaching English, 
Ancient History, and Home Economics te 

a I lign Si hool iii \ . i m. ml . 



DEUEL'S DKUQ STORE 



KODAKS 



CAMERAS 
Get that Picture now 
Developing Printing Enlarging 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



FILMS 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST \ DEACON, Props 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 

Books New and Standard 

Webster's Dictionaries, all prices, from 50c. up 
The Collegiate is the best for general use- at $5.00 

Die Stamped Stationery in Gold or Maroon 
1920 Numeral Stationery - Loose Leaf Note Books 
100 page Theme Tablets at 25 cents 



Everything 

the new 
student needs 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

IN THE M BUILDING 



Pens 
Paper Supplies 

Stationery 



SING LEE "AND LAUNDI.V 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mass 

Our ■ ..umlry I ir»t Clasa 

Our Policy f; ua ran«eeJ 



REPAIRING \M> ALL KIM>s OK 
\V\SIIIM. DONR AT REASONABLE 

OppaaJai Anm Office 



PKKI v 



SUITS THAT FIT AND PLEASE 

and^: l:, e ™ ": t t s; let us fit you ,o that suit ,hat you have been *"> mi > tn * y ° u ™ if *» - ■-«■ °« -* ■■ « »» *« — 



STETSON HATS 



CARL H. BOLTER 



NETTLETON SHOE 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, SEFF. 30, 1925 









1 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 

.111.1 
Thurs. 

3.00. 7/0 



Friday 
3.00. 6.45 

H..10 



Saturday 

3.00, Ml 
8.30 



" LICitiTNIiV" 

j.,hn (,<»idiiiii*N triumph 
wlili a caal Imleilina Jay 
Hi. in. Madia liillamy. hi hi- 1 
Clayton, Wallace McDonald, 
Otl* Harlan, and Bdyth* 
Chapman. Pralaad by ■*•*■ 
and |>iill<H. hlfth ar.d low. 
rli l> anil poor, ihls Is 'I llr 
ptctura for Ml. people. 
\ <ws I ahlvs « oiiifl) 

"SALVATION HUNTERS" 

The- ptt'tur* thai rc.i-ali-il 

iu'« aanlua to an Mton Un a n 

world. < :.»»! Includa* 
<;,.<irilla Hal*. Gw. K. Arthur 
and Stuart Holmes. 
Sponllflhl t.lyde<:ook 

• oiii-dy 



Moll. 

3.00 *.45 
8.30 



•KIM I < K ■> PRIOR 
A rumuru-t- of the Mutts and 
Oueensof the turf with J. 
l-arrell Mac Donald. Gat" 
I rude Amor and Henry B. 
Wnlthull and a lioct of the 

world's ftrantaal racehorses- 

Two of the Ure.ilesl aWM 
races ever filmed! 

New* Comedy 



Ili-rri .;ii lord Claire Adams 
and Viahlon Hamilton in 

"THE WHEEL" 
from John Golden'* Stag* 
Succ*M. I'acked with pep, 
an Incarnating plot and pow- 
erful climax. 

I'ath Review Comedy 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVLRY PAIR Of 

MUNSINGWEAR and MEDAL1A 
SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $U9 $1.75 

G. E dward Fisher 

s. s. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

.< PLEASANT STRKKT. (up one flight) 

OcullMs rtnacrtftlanf HHed. Broken lenses 

accuratily replaced 

Bit; HKN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While I' Wait 
NEW PRH BE 
Man's Whole Sole*. Rubber Haeu - - 
Men's Half Pole*, Rubbei Heel* - - 
Men's Rubbet Solera, Rabbet Heela • ■ 

Men's Half Soles 

Work Cnaranteed— AMHt EST HOUSE 
Open till 8 1*. M. 



1.7' 
2 I? 
I.M 



THOMI SONS TIMELY TALKS 

New Records for your old ones 

Trade your old RcCorda for new 
COME IN AM) WE WILL EXPLAIN 
THOMPSON'S SHOP 

RKAR AMHERST BANK 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

TheHest in Druft Store Service 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

gfra I RfiteaJUL Star* 



You will find an eicollent 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP . . . 

equipped with the most up-to-date CJoodyear 

Machinery and a modern 

SHOK SHINING PARLOR 

at II J Amity-Si.. - l.abrovitz Block 

IIV Kii./.rv/iiiii/ VOW r«ea ff»W» a fl unit are prr- 

purtit t'> mut \t>ur Hifiis 

Ml work guaranteed. Shoes ihintd ami dyed. 

MNCRNT <;RANI>ONK:0. Prop. 



Special Sale for 10 cays 

Many Bargains in 

SHOES for the College Boy 

Suitable for any occasion 

JOHN KOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



YE AGGIE INN 



WE HAVE THE MOST COMPLETE LINE OF 

Banners, note books and all other necessities of the student. We carry 

(QUALITY) Waterman, Conklin, Parker and Chilton Fountain Pens. 



(SERVICE) 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 



\-.s,,i i.iii Alumni 

Memorial Hall 

MAC. Athletic Asportation 

Academic Activities 

The College Senate 
Track Association 

BMeball Association 
loot hall Association 

The Collegian 

llockev Association 
Basket I. all Association 

Roister Doistera 

Musical (lulis 

1096 Index 

1027 Index 

M.A.C. Christian Association 

Public Speaking and Debating 



Richard Mellen, .Wt Secy 
Richard Mellen. Mgr. 

( . S. Hicks, < .eneial Mgr. 
Frank I'. Rand. Mgr. 

Lawrence L. Jones, Pre. 

. J. E. < ireenaway, Mgr. 

William I.. Dole, Mgr. . 
. Francis W. Warren, Mgr. 

Mary T. Boyd, Editor 

Donald R. Williams, Mgr. 

Preston Davenport, Mgr. 

I*hili|> N. Dow, Mgr. 

Harry K. Iraser, Mgr. 

Myron Smith, Mgr. 
. Kenneth W. MUligan, Mgr. 
. Roy E. Norcross, I'residenl 

Raymond Smith, Mgr. 



Teiephont 

. 17.VJ 

17.VJ 

403-M 

. 119-X 
8814 
8326 

171) 

lititi-M 

. 547- M 

. ri'.t. M 

280 

720 

171) 

sail 
8825 
8825 

:«M) 



LANDSCAPE CLUB 

Tne Laadscapa Cluh held its hrst 
meeting ol the year in Wilder Hall last 
Thursday, at which plana lor Ihe year 

were disi 'iissed and SUM plans for the 

arrangement of an entertainmeni pro- 
gram were nude. The club is planning ■ 

trip to Mi. [obey in the near future. It 
h hoped that Mr. Steven Hambhn, direc 
tor of the Harvard Botanical Garden* 
and Professor oi Horticulture si Harvard 
will accompany the club on this trip. 



Pniiip N. I ton '-'' oi Bolton lias bet n 
elected manage! of the Rowter Doistera 
to succeed Horace II. Woruam sho has 
been forced to leave college. Dos sraa a 
candidate lor manager tne - tme time thai 
Worssam araa and therefore is well quali- 
fied for the position. 



Mr. Henrj Wendh ml instructor 

ot Agriculture al the lamaica Plain High 
School, arho sraa a apecial atudenl al 

M.A.C. from I'.'!'.) to 1022, completed his 

courses in education and secured his 

Bachelor'i Degree from Boston Univer- 
sity in the College of Education in June 
1025. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

— AT — 

TOWN PRICES 

PAGE'S SHOE STORE 
Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the best in everything 



The Slickest Coat 
on the Campus! 



Brass Trays 
Candlesticks 
Cigarette Boxes 
Sandwich Baskets 



MISS CUTLER'S 
.GIFT SHOP.. 



No well dressed college man is 
without one. It's the original, 
correct slicker and there's noth- 
ing as smart or sensible for rough 
weather and chilly days. 

Made of famous yellow waterproof 
oiled fabric. Hat all-' round (trap on 
collar and elastic at wrUt-band*. 

Clasp - closing style 

Button-closing style 

Sump the correct name in your 
memory, and buy no other. The 
"Standard Student" i* made only 
b v the Standard Oiled Clothing Co., 
New York. Slip one on 

All Best Dealers 




Tune 



in 



on 



WBZ 



Friday, Nov. i 3 



tor 



World 



Aggie 



Night 





The winning 
stride b 

Watch him at the "Prom." He'a 
there with perfect ballroom con- 
dition from soles of his patent 
pumps to top of his glossy dome. 

He's iu*t a* neat after the twentieth 
dance a* during the first (ox trot. There'* 
no secret about hi* method. "Vaseline" 
Hair Tonic goes to his head regularly. 
It make* his hair silky and manageable 
and prevents dandruff. At all drug stores 
and student barber shop*. 

Every "Vauline" product is rtcom ■ 
mended everywhere because •/ its 
absolute purity and effectiveness: 

Vaseline 

■to u s fat. err. 

HAIR TONIC 

for tfca Health nasi 
Appearance of the Hair 

Cheaebrough Mfg. Co., (Cons'd) 
State Street New York 






UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



Do College 

Students Read 

Advertisements? 

If you do, surely you 
will read this one 

One fine day a Sophomore from a leading Univer- 
sity came to see us, suggesting that we advertise in 
their undergraduate paper, and best of all convinced 
us, and this is how he did it: 

First— He believed in Life Insurance because hie 

uncle (a good business man) had advised him to 

buy some. 

Second — His Father died in the prime of life and 

good health and left almost no insurance, when 

he could have carried $50,000. 

Third— He also knew that he could buy Insurance 

NOW at half the annual cost his uncle and 

Father had paid for theirs. 

All this convinced him that even though a student, 
he should take out as much Life Insurance as his 
allowance would permit. 

What About You? 

Every college student looks forward to a career, 
which will make possible the fulfillment of the most 
cherished desires— surely Insurance is a necessary 
part of this program. 

Insure, in part at least the value of your educated 
self, NOW, making up your mind to increase it as 
business or professional success follows. 
The John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Com*" 
pany issues all forms of Life Insurance, endowments 
for home and estate protection, mortgage replace- 
ment, education of children, bequest or income for 
old age; also annuities and permanent disability. The 
John Hancock is particularly interested in insuring 
college men and women and obtaining college grad- 
uates for the personnel of the field staff. 

If you have read this advertisement, 
you itiill aid your undergraduate 
paper by communicating with the 



Life Insurance Company 

or Boston. Massachusetts 
197 Clarendon Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

Over Sixty Year* in Business. Now Insuring Over Two Billion Dollar* 
in Policies on 3,500,000 Live* 



a 



<=S5 



$w£&Mm8^$3m?j^^Mrms. 



TUTORING 

Ar yoa Having trou' le with 
tit Kniilis'" triemes? 

Sec JOHN F. LAMBERT at t1 e 

Lambda C ,,p! a House. Tel. 8225 



College Outfitters — 

HATS FASHION PARK CLOTHING HABERDASHERY OF DISTINCTION 
Custom Tailoring :-: Headquarters for College Men 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



®frg jJaBHarljttggtta ffloUgfflBn 



Vol. xxxvi. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, OCT. 7, 1925 



No. :* 



Former Senator Gleason 

Dies at Brookf ield Home 

Trustee of College for Thirty- Six Years 
Is Victim of Apoplexy 



I QnMf Senator CaWtiei A. I .Ictson, of 

M.naai lunette. •< tnnte* ol tbe M.i^-.i 
chuaetta Agricultural Cottefe, died of 

jpoptary, Sept. L".». at his home in West 
Brookfiekl. Although over seventy-five 
years old, Senator Gleaaon had apparently 

been enjoying ««H>d health and had just 
rjaen after writing some letters, when he 
■Aa >tricken. 

Senator (ileason was prominent on the 
Board of TrUOteW -"id has held some very 
importttt positions during his term of 
thirty-six years. He was first ap|>ointed 
in lSHt) and has occupied the |>ositions of 
U(t -prcsident and chairman of the 
Finance ( ommittee since 18WS. In addi- 
,„„! he lias served as auditor and as a 
number of the committee on Horticulture. 
He has heen prominent in agricultural 
■aciety work, especially in the grange. 

II, was noted for being a conservative 
leader, and a very effective shaker; for 
pmratilH an exceedingly keen mentality 
mil a great fund of common sense. He 
Matted in as a school teacher, later prac- 
tising Dairy Farming in New Uraintree 
until al>out 1S<)5, when he retired on 
mount of his wife's health. He lived for 
a time in Ware and Springfield, finally 
settling in West Brookfield, where he 
«aa highly respected and admired. He 
performed deeds of benevolence where- 
ever he went, delighting in helping poor 
I'Hiple. 

President Lewis, Secretary Watts, Mr. 
Kenny, and members of the Board of 
IniMecs attended the funeral services 
uliuh were held at the late Senator 
U.tson's home in West Brookfield, at 
:U<) Thursday afternoon. 



Cross Country Team 

Opens Season Friday 

M.A.C. Harriers Meet Rhode Island 
State as First Opponents on Difficult 
Schedule. 



The opening of the MAC cross- 
country season will be signalized by a 
m* with Rhode Island on Friday, Oct. 
Bth at Kingston. The largest squad ever 
to ri|>ort at M.A.C. has been working out 
daily in preparation for the first clash. 
DeapitC the inclement weather last Satur- 
day, coach Derby gave the harriers their 
initial time trials, with very satisfactory 
r. Milts. The lineup of the first team will 
probably change somewhat as the season 
progresses, since there are several promis- 
ing candidates out who will improve with 
added experience. In the try-outs on 
Setorday the field was led home by 
Notubaert, a veteran of last fall's team, 
followed by Wheeler, another veteran, 
who was closely pursued by Biron, a new 
entry. Captain Bartlett of Springfield 
was fourth, a shade ahead of Crooks, 
another experienced hill-and-daler. Swan, 
heatDtt, and Forest, all new candidates 
for the team, came in the order mentioned. 
Forest completed the course despite the 
loss of a shoe enroute. 

A team of seven will make the trip to 
Kingston for the initial race of a difficult 
^hedule. The list of opponents follows: 
Oct. 17— Williams at M.A.C. 

21— Wesleyan at Middletown 

24— W.P.I, at M.A.C. 

30— Amherst at M.A.C. 
Her. 7— B.U. at Boston 

16— N.E.I, at Boston. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Wednesday, Oct. 7 

Mountain Day. 
Thursday, Oct. 8 
A-sembly. Speaker, Mr. O. B. Lester 

of New York. 
Glee Club rehearsal, Mem. Building. 
Fr »day, Oct. 9 
\ arsity cross-country, M.A.C. vs. 
Rhode Island at Kingston. 
Saturday, Oct. 10 
Varsity football, M.A.C. vs. Norwich 

at Alumni Field. 
1 nshman football, Greenfield High 
School at Greenfield. 
Monday, Oct. 12 

fwt Year football, Dalton High 
^rhool at Dalton. 



BLOMQUIST AGAIN 

HEADS SOPHOMORES 



Will Serve Fourth Consecutive Term. 
Harold E. Clark Elected Treasurer. 



(i. Stanley Blomquist of Cjuincy was 
reelectecf president of the class of 1038, 
at a (lass meeting held last Thursdav 
after Assembly. This is the fourth time 
that Blomquist has l>een elected to this 
office, having served continuously as 
president since the class entered college 
a year ago. All the officers who served 
during the spring term last year were 
reelected with the except ion of Harold 
K. Clark, of Montague, who was elected 
treasurer to succeed Thomas \Y. Ferguson. 
The following are the i -lass officers who 
will serve during the coming term: 
President, ('.. Stanley Bloniquist of 
Quincy ; Vice - President, Frances C. 
Thompson of Amherst; Secretary, Mar- 
jorie J. Pratt of Dalton; Treasurer, 
Harold E. Clark of MontOgwS; Sergeant' 
at- Arms, Mario Capone of Chelsea; 
Captain, Howard Thomas of Holyoke. 



Chromatic Coats 

Crash Campus Calm 

The Campus Coat, Last Word in 
Sartorial Pyrotechnics, Come to 
Agftie. 



LARGE REGISTRATION 

IN TWO YEAR COURSE 



Over a Hundred Freshmen Already 
Admitted. Abbey to be Well Filled. 



The largest number of first year stu- 
dents in the history of the Two Year 
course presented themselves for regis- 
tration last Monday. The final figures 
were not obtainable at the time of going 
to press but facts made public by Director 
Roland Yerbeck show that the registra- 
tion will be over 1(X), which is an increase 
of .i I unit twenty over last year's enroll- 
ment. A larger number of co-eds than 
usual have registered in this course, and 
several students from Connecticut ao«l 
New Hampshire are included in the roll. 



FROSH FOOTBALL 

TEAM WINS 8-0 



Neophytes Defeat Northampton High 
School in First Game of Season. 



Joseph's coat, of Biblical tradition, w.i- 
a mere study in pastels. Autumn leaves 
have put aside their colors and turned 

pale in envy, Sundry shrieking iweatera 

hove withdrawn humbly into the gran 
ful shade of the overcoat. The "campus 
coat" has come to the campus. 

lineal descendcnt of the horse-blanket 
and "d. t.'s", the campus coat DtaJM 
unabashed in all its glory. Vivid greens 
and yellows, in dizzying whirls and 
jagged edges, or blues and reds in Indian 
designs designed to make the Indian 
turn over in his grave at 120 revolutions 
per minute, — it's all the same to the 
campus coat. Sometimes the background 
is toned down to make the design evoe 
more startling, and the coat then ap|>cars 
as a jacket, but most often it follows the 
simple standaid lines of the lounging 
robt fas advertisers do often call the 
humble Iwthrobei. 

The wearers of the campus coats stand 
a lot of verbal punishment. The stock 
crack is "S'matter forget you had a class 
this morning?" The Ix-st one so far, in 
view of the fact that the component 
blankets of these coats appear in the 
booths of every well-conducted fair, is 
"Why didn't you try for one of those 
Kewpie dolls while you were at it?" 

"They are warm," say the owneis of 
the coats. "They are more than that, 
they are red hot," says the campus. 



NOTICE 

There will be no issue of the 
Collegian next week because of the 
hoi id a v cm Monday. October 12. 



FLORICULTURE CLASS 

JUDGES AT AMHERST II. 



S. 



Flower and Yegetable Exhibit Judged 
by Aggie Seniors. 



Maroon and White Crashes 

Through in First Game 

Aggie Football VVurriers defeat Bates 19-0. 
as Condition Triumphs on Slimy Field 



GIRLS GLEE CLUB 

TO BE RECOGNIZED 



Sidney B. Haskell Elected President 
of Academic Activities Board. 



Director Haskell of the Experiment 
Station staff, was elected to head the 
Academic Ac tivilics Board at the chit ion 
of officers during the meeting of the 
Board last Thursdav afternoon, Dean 
Mac Inner received the vie e presidency . 
and Mr. Richard Mellen, Alumni Secre- 
tary, was elected SeeTrtarv ol the Board. 

Tin- < '.iris (dee Club was one of the 
main items considered during the meet 
ing. It was the sentiment of the Board 
that the glee club should be t cni.it ivelv 
recognized as an academic activity with 
the exception that members mav earn 
ae.iilcniie credits, the amount however, 

to be determined later. 



CHRISTIAN ASS0. 

PREPARES FOR ACTION 



Discussion Groups and Deputation 
Work to (iet Under Way Soon. 



The freshmen inaugurated their foot- 
ball season with an 8 to victory over 
Northampton High School on Alumni 
Field last Saturday. They clearly out- 
classed the High School players, McKit- 
trick and Macione on the offensive, and 
Mills on the defensive being the contribu- 
ting factors in the defeat of the visitors. 
Errors paved the way for both scores. In 
the second quarter DeRose, back for a 
punt, was tackled behind his own goal. 
In the next session, after gaining posses- 
sion of the ball within striking distance of 
the goal, the freshmen, with McKittrick 
and Macione alternating, proceeded to 
rush the ball across. The line-up: 



Four members of the senior e lass acted 
as judges at a display of (lowers and 
vegetables at the Amherst High Scfcool 
last Friday afternoon. All of the flowers 
and vegetables displayeel were grown in 
the various s< hool gardens in this vie inity. 
The exhibit was arranged and ■eperviaed 
by John (.. Read '24, a teacher in the 
Amherst High Si -hool, anil was judged by 
the following: Earl W. Brouorton, A. 
Wesley Jones, Raymond E. Smith, and 
F. Lores Sniffen all of *26. 



Kappa Epsilon 
Buys New House 

Occupies Former Home of Kappa 
Gamma Phi on Pleasant Street. 



M.A.C. 1929 

Foster, le 
Cox, It 
Steere, lg 
Mills, c 
Rich, rg 
Kreienbaum, it 
Bailey, re 
Giandomenico.qb 
McKittrick, Ihb 
Webber, rhb 
Macione, fb 

Touchdown — McKittrick. Safety — De- 
Rose. Referee — Williams. Umpire — 
Sawyer. Head linesman — McLaughlin. 
Time — 12 minute periods. Substitutions 
1929 — Burgess for Giandomenico, Giando- 
menico for Macione, Macione for Burgess. 
Northampton — J. Sullivan for Koukowski, 
Koukowski for Smith, Salvo for O'Connell, 
O'Connell for Salvo, Salvo for Waite, 
Waite for Borowski. 



Norrhampton 

re, O'Connell 

rt, Ryan 

rg, Borowski 

c, Smith 

lg, Saner 

It, Miller 

le, Allen 

qb, D. Sullivan 

rhb, DeRose 

Ihb, Koukowski 

fb, Waite 



Dennis R. A. Wharton, instructor of 
microbiology here, has resigned to go to 
the College of Medicine in the University 
of Virginia where he will teach micro- 
biology. 



Kappa Epsilon fraternity has once more 
returned to fraternity row because of its 
purchase of the house formerly rented by 
Kappa Gamma Phi. Kappa Epsilon was 
forced to leave its Pleasant Street home 
last year when the house which it rented 
was purchased for a private residence. 
Kappa Gamma Phi is temporarily occu- 
pying the house on East Pleasant Street 
which Kappa Epsilon has just vacated. 



NEW FACULTY APPOINTMENTS 



Dr. Leon A. Bradley has been appointed 
Assistant Professor of Microbiology at 
M.A.C. Dr. Bradley is a graduate of 
Wesleyan University and for the past 
three years has pursued graduate study at 
Yale from which he received the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy. While at Yale 
he was associated with Dr. Leo F. Rettgcr 
and conducted research work-in bacteri- 
ology. 

Miss Mary J. Foley has been appointed 
instructor in Agricultural Economics here, 
and Mr. Harry T. Mortenson has been 
appointed instructor in Microbiology. 



The Landscape Club will have its first 
outing of the year on Friday, October 9th. 
The members will take a trip to Mt. 
Toby accompanied by faculty members 
of the Landscape and Horticulture De- 
partments. 



Discussion courses for liisliinen ate to 
be si.uiicl soon, which will 1m- held under 
the leadership of Mr. Il.imia and uiuh i 
classmen. Tne definite plans lor t In M 
disc ussions will Ik- announced later. 

The Conation i\aanriet8on is making 

extensive plans for deputation work. 
Any man in the two yon and four yen 
courses who has any talent as a musician, 
either vocally or instrumentally, or who 
can charm audienns with humerous 
readings, and who is willing to take time 
for such an activity, is urged to give his 
name to Mr. I lamia or to Roy Norrross, 
president of the Christian Association, 
within the next two weeks. 

The association has provided the follow- 
ing religious publications which are now 
ready for use in the Association Room in 
North College. It is requested that these 
Ixxjks Ik- left in the room. 

/)> iiomtntiiwnul 

The Churchman (Epiei opalian) 
The Spirit of Missions (Episcopalian) 
The ( Ongregationalist ((. ongregational) 
Zkm'a Herald (Methodist Kpiscopalj 
'The Christian Register (Unitarian) 
The Universalis! Leader (Universalist) 
The America (Roman Catholic) 

Undenominational Publications 
The Christian Century 
The Christian Work 
The Student World 
The Intercollegian 
Christian Education 
Federal Council Bulletin 
Student Volunteer Movement Bulletin 
Forum 
Vox SturJentium 

There are also Beveral other publica- 
tions of a semi-religious character. 



The M.A.t football teen ol I'.'l'.'i In- 
augurated its scasim propitiously by 

whipping Bates at l-ewistmi last Satur- 
dav l«.» to I) in drine hing rain and all- 
pervading mud. The well conditioned 
Agates plowed took way at will through 
the ceiiiallv hcaw BotOl line. 

The game was one sided from the first 
whistle to the tint I gun. Hates had the 
ball just twice during the liist hall and 
tliev chose to kick on the first play c-.u li 
time. The Agrigaiion received on the 
kie kolf ami plunged ahead to Hates' 
thirtv live- v.ml line in a short time. 
Then Sullivan heaved a piss fifteen yards 
to Jones who plowed on twenty varels 
uiciic- loi a tunc Inlovvu. 

Again the visitois nionopoli/.c-cl the- hall 
but the) clid not tally until t he n. \t 
quarter. On BotOO 1 two vaul line a 

fumbla nc.itlv est the oieoac the hall 

but (.iistalson dove- into im Ins ol mini 
and water and reioven-d the oval behind 
I he goal. • 

The would be iii.iickiii stex kings wire- 
discarded Itctwccn the- halves, thus re- 
lieving the VM-aieis ol se-veTal im.uiicIh. 
Straight line plunges in the third peri.nl 
In. night the ball again within scoring dis- 
tance- and Sullivan carried it ove-r. Jones' 
kick for the extra |>oint was successful. 

In the last c|u.iitei, BotOaatOgod its only 
iillcnsive Hash when Charlie Ray splaslu-el 
off an end run. 

Perhaps the man who had the- toughest 
job, and who did it aasjB, was the- little- 
Aggie- center, "Phil" Couhig whose- passes, 
about nine t\ in number,, were made- with- 
out a misi in-. Sullivan and Hilyar.l did 
most of the- carrying. "Joe" Ililyarel 
averaged about four yards a play in line 
bue ks only In all M.A.C. gained oVOf 
three hundred yards in eighty two plays 
and made- twenty first downs to Males' 
one-. The home- team never got within 
sixty yards of the Aggie goal. 

Among the- Aggie rooters were "Bill" 
Leonard HI. 'Doe'' Hubbard '13, "IW 
Pe-irson 'HI, "Hu.k" Sargent '2.*, "Ted" 
(base ft, ami "Admiral" Sims 94 
"Turk" Mouradian '2."i, sent a congratu- 
latory telegram to Lewiston from Cam- 
bridge-. 

The- summary: 
Mass. Aggie 

Jones, le 
Aniste-in, it 
Thurlow, rg 
( ouhig, c 
Block, lg 

t iavin, it 
( 'ook, le 
( iustafson, qb 
Sullivan, rhb 

Moberg, Ihb 

Hilyar.l, fb 

Score by period* 1 

Aggies 



Two Year Football 

Squad Works Out 



Team Handicapped by Lose of Capt. 
Davis and Other Veterans. 



The Two Year football squad, number- 
ing about twenty, including eight seniors, 
has been holding three work-outs daily 
under the tutelage of "Red" Ball prior 
to the opening of the Two Year school. 
Davis, captain-elect, failed to return, and 
as did several others of last years fresh- 
men. The initial encounter comes on 
Columbus Day at Dalton. The schedule, 
which is not yet fully completed, follows: 
Oct. 12— Dalton High at Dalton 

l(j — Springfield High School of Com- 
merce at Springfield. 
Nov. 7 — Drury High at North Adams 

1.1— Conn. 1929 at Storrs 

20 — Deerfield Academy at Deerfield 



Bates 

le, Palmer 

It, diner 

lg, Cobb 

c, Dielile 

rg, Per ha in 

rt, Woodman 

re, l-olsoiii 

qb,- Hinds 

Ihb, Mi Curdy 

rhb, C. Ray 

fb, Hubbard 

1 I X 4 Ttl. 

6 6 7 0—19 

Touchdowns — Jones, Gustafson, Sulli- 
van. Points from try after touchdowns — 
Jones. Referee— E. W. O'Connell, Port- 
land A. C. Umpire — C. D. C. Moore, 
Maine. Head linesman — I. Ingalls, Brown 
University. Time — two 15 minute periods 
and two 12 minute periods. Substitutions 
— Mass. Aggie: Marx for Amstein, Nicoll 
for Hilyard, Ha.-rtl for Moberg, Ma- 
honey for Haertl, Tulenko for Black, 
Smith for Cook, Malley for Smith, 
McAllister for Couhig, Fcssendan for 
Marx, Trull for Thurlow; Bates: Wheat 
for Hubbard, Williamson for Perham, 
Black for Ulmer, Wanderuff for Diehle, 
Foster for Black, Preck for Folsom, 
D. Ray for C. Ray. 



'25 "Sammie" Samuels is in charge of 
all athletics at the National Farm School 
in Pennsylvania. He is also teaching a 
class in history. 



SCORES OF OUR OPPONENTS 



Princeton 20, Amherst 
New Hampshire 16, Norwich 2 
Lowell Textile 12, St. Michael's 
N. Y. L'niv. 23, Conn. Aggie 
Tufts 7, Maine 6 
Worcester Tech 6, Trinity 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 7, 1925 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. OCT. 7, 1925 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official Mmpaptr <«f the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



HOARD OF EDITORS 



Maky t. leva '26 

Jqhn F. Lamhkkt '26 



E<IUor-inr( liief 
Maii.iniMK Editor 



1)1 •I'ARTMKNT EDITORS 



Editorial 
Cider Press 
Athletic* 

Campus News 



Co-Ed News 

Faculty News 



Maky T. Hoyi> '2ti 

Maky T. BOVB II 

William I.. boU *I 

IlAKUI.U U < 1AKK '2H 

Raymond F. Dih-ky '27 
I i iswokih Baknakd '28 

JoSKl'IIIKK PANZICA '28 

Frances C. Brucb '27 
F.HNL.sr L. Spknckr '28 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Alvin G. Stevens '26 Business Manner 

Edwin A. VVii.uer'28 Advertising Manager 

L«wis H. Wiutaker '27 Circulation Manager 

' John E. White '27 

Douglas W. Lorino '28 

Charles F. CLAM '27 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
oopiet 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



letting himself in for plasty <>f trouble." 

"Student* »rti different nowadays, 

though. There Lso'l any more real c oll age 

aatagoniam any more. Why, young man, 

an Ainhfist man could come- down lure 
juM aftt-r they had lie keel you in football 
and you would DC perfectly BJCC to him 
and talk to him just like you liked him. 
It wasn't that way in my day," the Old 

( .iad sighed, 

"It's rather an improvement , don't 
you think?" suggested the Reporter. 

" I gueai so," said the Old Grad. "I 

guess so. Hilt you were asking me about 
tin Amherst men eating up here. Well, 
in one way it's a great compliment to us, 
though it does seem as if someone ought 
to put up a place to feed them nearer 
home. They behave well. to. except they 
'hi^h-hat' us a little more than I think 
they ought to, considering that we are, 
in a way, their hosts." 

"Still and all," he concluded, "it's all 
rinlit , except I wish they wouldn't eat all 

my favorite desserts before I net there. 

I never j;et anv desMit any more," Mud 

the old Grad plaintively as he walked 

away. 




Entered as second-clans matter at the Amherst 
Post Office Accepted fo- mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in section 1 103. Act of Oc- 
tober, 1017 authorized August 20, 1918. 



Professors and Salaries 

"The Forum" this month is printing 
an extremely pertinent article entitled 
"$50,(HM) for Professors". The article is 
in many ways revolutionary, and in all 
ways interesting. Aside from the con- 
clusion, familiar to us all from hundreds 
of lectures, stories, and articles, that the 
American undergraduate is singularly raw 
and unprepared, the writer makes several 
startling suggestions. 

The first is that no more buildings 
should be erected on college campuses 
(but this does not apply to the Aggie 
gymnasium!;, and that the sums de- 
signed for such building purposes be 
devoted for a decade to increasing staff 
salaries. Furthermore, it is stated that 
five thousand dollars is the common sum 
spent for one year's college expenses in 
the majority of our American colleges; 
and that three thousand dollars is well 
above the average annual salary for the 
educational force at college or university. 
Moreover, five thousand dollars, tin- 
average expenditure for the average 
student, is the utmost which a young 
instructor of extraordinary talents at 
thirty can look forward to receiving, 
with any decree of confidence, at the a§S 
of fifty. The discrepancy is obvioUB. 

It is even more obvious that an instruc- 
tor cannot give his best work when he 
must constantly concern himself over his 
financial affairs. In that cast the pro- 
fessor, who should be the scholar, the 
prophet, priest, and philosopher of de- 
mocracy — becomes the worried house- 
holder whose "job" happens to be 
lea chin g. 

The remedy? liist. restriction of 
student numbers, and the elimination of 
the two lower college classes; thus pro- 
viding a group with whom an instructor 
could have an inspiring mental contact. 
And second, a minimum salary of $20,000 
a vear, the average salary to Ik- from 
$30,000 to 150,000, for all instructors. 
Salaries of profes s or s, who are trained 
men, should be on a par at least with 
those of cor po r a tion lawyers and indus- 
trial scientist-. 

Why should a nation Spending hundreds 
of millions a year on chewing gum and 
Candy refuse hundreds of thousands to 
their intellectual leaders? Money is 
being given yearly in large sums to 
educational institutions. What is needed 
is less building, and more salaries. The 
"Forum" article advocates the slogan 
"$50,000 I year for professors ". The 
idea is certainly revolutionary, but none 
the less practical and essential for all that. 



More Singing 
Hasn't anyone anything at all to say 
about this question of our college tinging? 

It seems obvious that the matter needs 
discussion, at least. If the class sings are 
ever to Ik- revived, as so many ot our 
graduates Iio|k- they will, what are we 
going to do to make singing more popular? 
The only comment we have heard so far 
is the somewhat ambiguous remark of 
the Assembly speaker, who, after we had 
rendered the college song with even less 
spirit than usual, told us how much he 
had enjoyed our "splendid execution". 
( )f course, he may not have meant it that 
way! But then again, it is quite possible 
that he did. 

Meanwhile, how about offering us a few 
suggestions? 



2. 



Our College Life 

As the Irosh pictures it in August. 
8 — Rise, Shave. Hreakfast. 
9 — Saunter to class under the arching 
elms of the campus. 

10 — Attend lectures, appearing Inter* 

aatad in a scholarly interested 
manner. 
12 — Luncheon. 
1 — Walk to class with beautiful co-ed. 
4 — A little light exercise. 
7 — Entertainment by a favored fra- 
ternity. 
8— Date. 
12— To bed. 
As be knows it in October. 
7 — Get up. Postpone shaving. Grab 
a piece of bread and sprint for 
chapel, 
8 — Hurry to class over the bounding 

'.is of the campus sidewalk. 
!i 12 Frantic endeavor to make note- 
taking keep up with prof's tongue. 
12— Hash. 
1 — Work off |)enaltyfor walking with a 

co-ed. 
4 — Hard practice. 
7 — Entertain favoring fraternity. 
8 — Study, continuing indefinitely. 

CP 

Or Doesn't It? 
Dear Kditor: 

Please settle a dispute for me. What is 
a waffie? Major Home Ec. 

Dear Major: 

A waffle is a section of a fried cross- work 
puzzle. Ed. 

CP 

And that, mes enfants, is that! 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

A simple way to keep your teeth in good condition: a 

Good Tooth Brush and your favorite Dentifrice 

used regularly. Both to be had at 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co.* 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST & DEACON, Prop*. 



NIRNS 




Collegiate Brogue Oxfords. 

Imported and Domestic Leathers. 

$6.50 to $11.00 pair 

COME IN AND GET ACQUAINTED 

B0LLES liHOE STORE 



MAIN STREET 



AMHERST 



PHILLIPS TO RESIGN 

CHEMISTRY POST 



Instructor Leaves M.A.C. to Pursue 
Research Work in Dairying. 



Mr. Arthur \V. Phillips has resigned his 
poMt ion on the teaching staff of the 
Chemistry Department in order to accept 
an apjxnntmint as Assist ant Research 
Professor with the Experiment Station. 
Under the Purnell Fund, he will there 
pursue researches on dairy products 
Professor Phillips regrets that he is to 
lose the O pp or tun ity to come into closer 
((intact with the students, but that he 
hopes to retain the friendships (?) of last 
year. 



Shoes, Mittens and 

Livestock Rations 



AT THE ABBEY 



As a result of the (dee Club try-outs 
held in the Memorial Building last 
Wednesday evening, eleven freshman 
^irls were added to the club, and I.ora 
Batcheldor '-S, was made pianist. There 
is vers promising material for an orches 
tra and try-outs will be held for this, 
later in the month. 

M 

The musical club of Delta l'ni is 
planning to hold a bridge-tea among 
the faculty ladies for the benefit of the 
"Buy a Brick" fund. This will be held 
in the Abbey living room the afternoon 
of October 17th. 

M 

Sunday afternoon over forty of the girls 
went on a hike to the Rille Range. The 
hike was given by the members of Delta 
Phi Gamma to the new girls. 

M 

It is with the very deep e st regret that 
we announce the jwssing of a great 
Abbey institution. No longer, when a 
man conies to call, do we hear, "Hey, 
your man's here!" echoing down the 
corridors. Instead we hear only a weak 
little buzz. 'Tis the new Abbey telephones 
one on each end of every floor. 



1 



Lord Jeff Dines Out 

"Well, sir." said the Old Graduate, 
when our inquiring reporter asked him 
what he thought ot so many Amherst 
men esttng in our cafeteria, "talk about 
the lion and the lamb King down to- 
gether — they're doing more than that 
here, they're fairly kissing each other." 

"Now in my time," said the Old Grad, 
warming to his theme, "a man wearing 
an 'A' on his chest would have been as 
safe on this campus as an angleworm in 
a pool of ten-loot trout. Those were the 
days when there was some jKiint in having 
policemen at football games, and a man 
straying on the other man's campus was 



INTKRCLASS TRACK MEET 



The annual fall interclass track meet 
will DC held on Saturday, October 17th 
at - p. m. The football team will be at 
Storrs, and the only other home attrac- 
tion will be the varsity cross country 

meet with Williams, intercollegiate cham- 
pions of the East last year. Numerals 
will be given to all men winning at least 
five points according to the latest ruling 
of the interclass athletic board. Entries 
will close on Friday afternoon, October 
liith at five o'clock. 



In provincial times the farmers and 
their families made their own stock- 
ings and mittens out of the wool 
which they raised upon their farms. 
They made soap out of wood ashes 
from their fire-places, and candles 
out of bees-wax. At 
times they even made 
their shoes from 
"home-grown leather." 

But modern farmers 
live in an age of spe- 
cialization. A farmer's 
time is far too valuable 
to spend in making 
shoes and mittens. He 
finds that it is wiser 
for him to sell his milk 
or his beef and to buy 
his shoes from the 
shoemaker. The 
shoes are better and 
they cost him less! 

The modern scientific 
farmer, who keeps a 
careful record of his 



costs and profits, has found that 
the same is true of making live- 
stock rations as is true of making 
shoes and mittens. He finds that 
such an organization as the Purina 
Mills is able to furnish him a far 
more efficient and eco- 
nomical supplement 
to his home-grown 
feeds than he could 
possibly mix by hand. 

Purina Chows are the 
proofs of what a 
modern mill, modern 
equipment, quantity 
buying of ingredients, 
and scientific research 
work can do, to lower 
the farmer's cost of 
production. The ac- 
tual records of thou- 
sands of successful 
farmers are proofs 
one cannot overlook. 

PURINA MILLS 

963 Gratiot Street, St. Louis, Mo. 

Buffalo Kansas City E. St. Loui* 

Minneapolis 




'23 George G. Holley is employed with 
O. H. Bauer, landscape architect, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



Thia man is taking a sample of tha 
mo/asses that goes into Purina Cow 
Chow. Thia sample is then tested 
for quality in the Purina Chemical 
Laboratory. 




WWfcn 



KNOX HATS the college man's choice. 

| BURBERRY COATS the best in six con- 
tinents. 

Spalding Athletic Goods 




Hickey-Freeman and Scheyer Suits— 

the last word in tailoring 

Imported Furnishings, second to none. 
Cleaning, Pressing, Dry Cleaning, all hand work 



For the First Home Game— 

You'll need something to keep away the 
chilly winds. 

Windbreakers, Sweaters, Top Coats, Woolen 
Socks are some of the few things that will 
help and of course you'll need a new sheep 
skin. 



F. M. Thompson & Son 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 

Books New and Standard 
Webster's Dictionaries, all prices, from 50c. up 
The Collegiate is the best for general use at $5.00 

Die Stamped Stationery in Gold or Maroon 
1929 Numeral Stationery - Loose Leaf Note Books 
100 page Theme Tablets at 25 cents 



ONITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 




Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



r our Prof, will Confirm This: 

The ingredients of a good dairy ration, contain- 
ing 35 jb of 

Buffalo Corn Gluten Feed 

can be bought and mixed by the dairyman at a 
cost of about $45.00 per ton. Fed in the regular 
way to good grade Holsteins or other cows, a 
ton of such a ration will produce 3 tons of milk, 
Which at $2 per cwt. amounts to $120; at $3 per 
cwt. $180. 

This is economical feeding. It is possible because 
Buffalo, the milk-producing part of the ration, 
is low in cost but high in protein and total di- 
gestible nutrients. That's why («% Protein) 
Buffalo will always be a part of 



JACKSON & CUTLER — 

READY TO WEAR 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS 




100 »OVWD« I 



EVERY LIVE DEALER'S STOCK 

AND 
EVERY GOOD DAIRY RATION 

Corn Products Refining Co. 

New YorR Chicago 

JUmo Manufacturers 
Diamond Corn Gluten Moat 



^ 



12 



A Protein Feed That Pays 

Corn Gluten Feed— 23% Protein 
"Almost Wholly Digestible" 

Corn Gluten Feed is a profitable protein ingredient 
for every ration. Successful feeders in 32 States are 
feeding it regularly. These practical men know its 
value. It pays them to feed it. 

One or more feeding experiments with Corn Gluten 
Feed in the ration will make your school work more 
interesting and profitable to you. There are several 
good reasons why this is so. 

Corn is grown in all the States. It is worth more 
than any other farm crop. We need corn more than 
anything else grown on the farm, and without it we 
would almost starve. 

The product of corn most needed by the farmer and 
feeder is Corn Gluten Feed. A ton of it contains as 
much protein as 2H tons of corn and also the natural 
salts of five tons of the whole grain. 

Corn Gluten Feed is palatable and safe. It is never given 
as medicine nor has it ever caused abortion or blindness. Some 
dairymen feed it straight for high production tests. 

You arc going to help the farmer get the most out of his corn 
crop. This Research Bureau can be of great service to you, and 
we want to tell you about it. 

Write us today and we will send you our bulletins and show 
what we are doing in our nation-wide campaign for better feeding. 

Associated Corn Products Manufacturers 

Feed Research Department 

Hugh G. Van Pelt, Director 

208 South La Salle St., Chicago, III. 



YEW— 
MEAL 

WRIGLEYS 

makes your food do you 
more good* 

Note how It relieves 
that ituffy feeling 
after hearty eating. 

Sweetens the 
breath, removes 
food particles 
from the teeth, 
gives new vigor 
to tired nerves. 

Comes to you 
fresh, clean and 
full-flavored. 




The only place in town to buy 
strictly home made 

BREAD AND PASTRY 

IS AT 

DRURY'S 

College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



TUTORING 

Are you having trouble with 
those English themes? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 822$ 



Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the best in everything 



Autographed Copies 



Oh 



3QE 



3EJE 



EUDE 



E)QE 



3QG 



3HG 



3BG 



DAVID GRAYSON'S 

NEW BOOK 

"Adventures in^ Understanding" 

MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



THO/ViAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPOKA r E I> 



3 275 High St. 



Holyoke 



SHOES 

— ANI> 

H OS I e R V 

of Quality and Fashion for 
M. A. C. Students 



Everything 
the new 
student needs 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

IN THE M BUILDING 



Pens 
Paper Supplies 

Stationery 



SING LEE "AND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mass 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AND All. KINDS OF 
WASMINf. DONE AT KKASONARI.K 
PRICKS. 

Opposite Post Office 




The Game Has Started!! 

Your game of smooth dressing should also get under way. Let us help! 

New shipment of HATS, TOP COATS, SUITS, SHOES just arrived. 

H. BOLTER 

and 



MEN'S 



CARL 



OUTFITTERS 



AMHERST 



HYANNIS, on the Cape 




1 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 7, 1"25 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 

anil 

Thurs. 

3.00. 1M 



Madftf Bellamy. C;«-«>rtl»- 
U'Hrton, WalwrMcUwlUnd 

Margaret I. ivinttsli.il In 
' HAVOC" 

A ,„, rN „t MCtal »f* m to*" 
land iii.rinrt <»«' w " r - A<1 * 
ventura •>"•' heroism. 
N( .„ s Fables Com**) 



p«rcy M.iimoiit. 



Friday 

3.00, 6.45 
8.30 



Saturday 

3.00. * 45 
8.30 



Nell Ham- 
ilton ami "Mar> BrtSS. In 

••THE siKl'l l <>• ,» <)R - 
COTTEN Ml N 

From l ho »<<iry n y ^fS! 

Kll.lu- Turner. AremurkahW- 

romance of iru- umU-rwi.rlu. 

SportltOhi tossed*- 



YE AGGIE INN 



.SERVICE) OPERATED BY THE STUDENTS (QUALITY) 

National Note Books, Stationery, Parker, Waterman, Conklin, Chilson fountain pens, Toilet articles. 

M Everything the student needs for the class-room or his person." 
A. II. Doolittle '26 R. B. Sawyer '26 R. H. White '26 R. HIntzc '29 V. Tefft '29 



Anna Q. N s l ssSS. Uwla 
Stone, Mary Asior and I «W« 
ranee Wheat In 

••INEZ KKOM HOLLY- 
WOOD" 



ft 

and 



Adel.i KoRtrn M. Johns 
e real store of Hollywood 
J the Inside life of » •»- 



Motl. 



I "movie vampire. 
News Comedy 



NO MOV IKS 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

HUNS1NGWEAR and MEDALIA 
SILK HOSE 

BIO ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $U9 $1.75 

G. Edward Fisher 
s. s. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 

OculUL-lPreacrlptlon. Filled. Broken len.es 

accurately replaced 

BIO BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 

A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing. While U Wait 

NEW PRICES 
Mens Whole Soles. Rubber Heels - ■ ■'•" 

Men's Half Soles. Rubber Heels - • «•'» 

Mens Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels "S 

Men's Half Soles ■**• 

WorkGuaranteed-AMHERST HOUSE 

Open till 8 P. M. 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



The Slickest Coat on the Campus ! 

No well dressed college man a 
without one. It's the original, 
correct slicker and there's noth- 
ing as smart or sensible for 
rough weather and chilly days. 

Made of famous yellow water* 
proof oiled fabric. Has all* 
'round strap on collar andrlas* 
tic at wrist-bands. 

Clasp-closing style 

Button-closing style 

Stamp the correct name in your 
memory, and buy no other. 
The "Standard Student" is 
made only by the Standard 
Oiled Clothing Co., N. Y. C 

Slip one on 

ALL GOOD DEALERS 




Northampton Academy of Ma$ic 

Pa ul Hansell. M«r. 

Week of Oct. I THE NORTHAMPTON REP- 

ERTORY COMPANY In 

•MR. PIM PASSES BY" by A. A. Milne. 

Kv.-niiiKs St ■.15 Sat. Mat. at S.M 
PrkMi 11.10. 86c BOB. inrludinu tax 

Ne»t Week— SMITH by Somerset Maugham 



COLLEGE SHOES 



AT 



TOWN PRICES 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 
You can buy the Remington Portable 
and Corona Typewriters on easy pay- 
ments, if you wish. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

RRAR AMHERST BANK 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

The Beat in Drug Store Service 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



**• 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 

You will find an eicellent _„__ 

... SHOE REPAIRING SHOP . 
equipped with the most up-to-date Goodyear 
Machinery and a modern 
SHOE SHINING PARLOR 
at IT : Amity-Si.. - Labrovltt Block 

IIV understand MS 1 requirements and are fee- 
pared to meet your needs. ... 
•W! work guaranteed. Shoti shined and dyed. 
VINCEN T CRANDONICO. Prop. 

Special Sale for 10 days 

Many Bargains in 

SHOES for the College Boy 

Suitable for any occasion 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



ERESHMEN SOPHOMORES JUNIORS SENIORS ATHLETES 

Do You Know? 
" HOW TO STUDY " 

The Students Hand-Book of Practical Hints on the Technique of 

Effective Study 
by WILLIAM ALLAN BROOKS 
A GUIDE conlainiiw hundreds of practical I' inland short ruts in tl..; 
economy ol learning, to assist students in securing. MAXIMUM suiiulai* 1 n, 
RESULTS at a minimum cost of time, energy, and fatigue. 

ESPECIALLY RECOMMENDED for overworked students and athletes 
engaged in extra cuntculum activities and for averaRe and honor students who 
are workinK tor hi«li scholastic achievement. 

Some of the Topics covered 



Scientific Shortcuts In Effective 

Study. 
Preparing for Examinations. 
Writing Good Examinations. 
Brain and Digestion in Relation 

to Study. 
How to Take Lecture and Reading 

Notes. 
Advantages and Disadvantages of 

Cramming. 



Diet During Athletic Training. 
How to Study Modern Languages. 
How to Study Science, Literature. 

etc. 
Why Co to College? 
After College. What? 
Developing Concentration and 

Efficiency. 
The Athlete and His Studies, 
etc.. etc., etc.. etc.. etc., etc.. 





. ■ 

- 5 riF 



Why You Need This Guide 

■It is safe to say that failure to guide and direct study is the weak point in 
the whole educational machine Prof. G. M. Whipple. University 01 Michigan. 

'The successful men in college do not seem to be very happy. Most of them, 
especially the athletes are overworked." Prof. H. S. Canby. Yale. 

"Misdirected labor, though honest and well intentioned may lead to naught. 
Among the most important things for the student to learn is »»pw to study. With- 
out knowledge of this his labor may be largely in vain." Prof. G. F. Swain. M. 1. T. 

"To students who have nevet learnt How to Study. "work is very often a 
chastisement, a flagellation, and an insuperable obstacle to contentment. Prof. 
A. inglis. Harvard. 

"HOW TO STUDY" will show you how to avoid all misdirected effort. 

Get a good start and make this year a highly successful one by sending 
for this hand-lwok and guide NOW. 

You Need This Intelligent Assistance 



American Student Puhlisheis. 
22 West 43rd St. New York. 

Gentlemen : 

Please send me a copy of "How to Study" for 
which I enclose $1.00 cash, $1.10 check. 




CLIP 
AND MAIL 

TODAY 



Name . 
Address 



Since its inception the Gen- 
eral Electric Company has 
pioneered in the various 
fields of applied electricity. 
Today G-E engineers are 
co-operating with various 
State agricultural commit- 
tees in the study of farm 
and rural electrification. 
These committees include 
members of the agricultural 
college faculties. 

A new series of G-E adver- 
tisements showing what 
electricity is doing in many 
fields will be sent on request. 
Ask for Booklet GEK-1. 






When rural service lines bring electricity to the farmer's door, many 
of his labor troubles are at an end. Motors, large and small, will do 
the many chorea of farm and farm house for a few cents per day. 

The Farm Electrical 

Of the six and a half million farm homes in 
this country, only half a million have electricity. 

Still, the advantages of electricity are widely 
known. But there is more to farm electrifica- 
tion than the installation of motors, lights and 
heaters. Current must be brought to the farm, 
and that means many miles of transmission 
line, supporting poles, transformers, and ad- 
equate generating equipment. 

*• 
Slowly but surely the electrification of Amer- 
ican farms is taking place. As farmers learn 
how to use electricity, rural service lines reach 
out farther and farther into open country. 

Six million farms to be electrified! Here is a 
vast and virgin field for the application of 
electricity, with countless opportunities for 
college- trained men in the technical and com- 
mercial phases of this undertaking. And for 
the agricultural college student and others 
planning a future life in rural sections, it means 
a better, bigger, happier life-time now in the 
making:. 

•*»•**#***•**»»•»»»•»*»•» m*^h SB 1 



s>SS> 



GENERAL ELECTRIC 

GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY. SICHBNBCTADIY. N B W V °J ^ 

Headauarters For Style, Service and Satisfaction — . 

FoTthe man who would be well groomed, and correctly attired, who would have the admiration of his friends and the peace of mind that goes with rei« 
mPrrhandiseTe o« e? Tn unlimited array of authentic and exclusive clothing and haberdashery for particular college men. I 

toTes!r\dll ^ wear around campus a black crew neck sweater is both sightly and practical. We have plenty. 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



m 



Vol. XXXVI. 



ccr 

iBaagarltuflgftB (ggUgn, 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, OCT. 21, 1925 



MISS BUCKLER 
MOST POPULAR 

piitsfield Co-ed Carries off Honors 
in Junior Class Election. McVey 
is Most Popular Man. 



Mist Etta M. Bttcklaf of I'ittsfnid was 

chosen M tin- most popular co-ed ill thf 
junior dass at the class meeting last 

Thursday, v/hea the class charactan vara 
elected. Francis R. Mullen of Becket, 

pianist in the college orchestra, was 
chosen as the (lass musician. 

I be election of the most popular mem 
In r ol the class was so closely contested 
that a second election was held last 
Monday after chapel. Krnest < .. McVey 
ol Dorchester was finally chosen. Dallas 
I .ore Sharpe Jr., the son of the head of 
the department of Knglish at Boston 
University, was selected as the best 
politician. The other characters were 
-.Niied as follows: hest actor, Neal (\ 
Kohinson of Arlington; class athlete, 

Joseph R. llilyardof Beverly; bant dancer, 
Edward A. (onnell of Maiden; most 
.inlint fusser, Herbert l". Verity of 

VVol.urn, most rustic, Roger A. Cobb of 
\\ nullum; best orator, Herman E. 
Pickens of Stoneham; best soldier, 
Riaphad F. Biron of Amesbury and 
■rttiest, Joseph A. Mattey of Watertown. 
George F. Hatch of West Roxbury was 
chosen as the member of the class most 
likely to succeed; Herman F. Pickens 
(.line in for a second characteristic when 
selected as the class grind, as also did 
Krnest G. McVey who was chosen as 
the cigaret fiend. Dr. Ray E. Torrey of 
the department of Botany was judged as 
the most popular professor. 



Aggie Revue a 
Musical Comedy 

Tryouts to be Held Tonight at Eight 
O'clock. Everyone is Eligible. 



No. 4 



Tryouts for the Aggie Revue will be | 

held Wednesday evening at eight o'clock 

in the Memorial Building. This year the 
Aggie RevUC is to be presented in the 
form of a musical comedy in which the 
whole cottage will be represented, in- 
cluding of course, the two year classes 
Every daai should be included and am 
one with musical abilit\, either vocal or 
instrumental, is urged to be present at 
these tryouts. .See that your class is vet] 
represented. 



MILITARY PROMOTIONS 
IN SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Again bur, Davis, Elliott and Lane 
to be Sergeants. Twenty-five 
Corporals Chosen. 



Dr. Cance Attends 

Rutgers Ceremony 

Late Prof. Hasbrouck's Alma Mater 
Becomes University. 



Hilyard Elected 
Class President 

Football Star Unanimously Chosen 
Head of 1927. Council is Vice- 
President. 

pfa W. Ihlyard of Beverly was 

Unanimously elected president of the 

jiuuoi ehm at ■ meeting held last week. 

Edward A. < onnell of Maiden was chosen 

(■resident with Etta M. Bmkler of 

Pittslicld, the most popular co-ed in the 

Bj shown by the dan (liar. titer 

eiectioa, as secretary. The other officers 

U follows: treasurer, Robert W. Ames 

niton, N. H.; serjeant-at-arms, 

Demetrius Calanie of Natick; captain 

Ernest (,. McVey of Dorchester. 



Dr. Alexander K. Came, head of the 
department of Agricultural Kconomics, 
attended the installation of President 
John Martin Thomas, formerly President 
of Middlebury Cottage and later of I'enn. 
State College, who baCsMM President of 
Rutgers University a week ajjo last 
Wednesday. 

The New Jersey State College of 
Agriculture, the Women's Cottage of New 
Jersey, the School of Engineering, School 
of Education and Rutgers College, wen- 
united and will hereafter be administered 
as Rutgers University. 

Although Dr. Came represented his 
own Alma Alma Mater, Macalester 
College, and since MAC. sent no dele- 
gate, it was peculiarly fitting that some- 
one from M.A.C. was able to take part in 
the Rutgers ceremonials. M.A.C. owes a 
great deal to Rutgers. Our late beloved, 
Philip Bevier Haabrotick, was ■ graduate 

of Rutgers, cbua ol IB03. Abram Pruyn 

llasbrouck, of the "Illustrious Hashrouck 
family", a distant relative of our "Billy" 
llasbrouck, was its president for t«-n 

years, 1840 to 1800. 

President Butterfield was chosen to 

repre s en t Michigan Agricultural College, 

but at the last moment found it impossible 

to be present. 



Promotions of certain members of the 
><>phoniore class to noncommissioned 
officers in the R.O.T.C, were made last 
week by Captain 1). I.. Keane, I ).()!.., 
who is acting professor of military Science 
and tactics. The promotions weie made 
only after three weeks ot intensive drill 
during which the sophomores had a 
chance to show their ability to lead. 

hour cadets were promoted to sergeant 
position and twenty-five to that of 
OOrpOral The sergeants are A. \\ . 
Agambar, R. J. Davis, I.. \\ . Elliott and 

D. R. lane. The roster of the corporals 
are as follows: ( i. E. Be.irse, S. ( ,. Biota ' 

quiet, \v. A. Bray, T. J. Campion, If. 
Capons, H. E. Clark, Ian Denton, J. II. 
Forrest, R. I.. Fox, J. S. Hall, A. C. 
Hodson, \\. If. Howland, T. J. Kane, 
R. J. Karrer, R. A. Lincoln, J.J. Mahonev 
I- C. Marston Jr., \V. ||. M arx , W. K. 
McC.uire, J. K. Qufau*, A. J. Redgrave, 

E. J. Schmidt, C. J. Smith, B. A. Wilder, 
and L. R. Williams. 



Aggie Grindsters Blan_ 

Conn. R ivals, 13-0 

M.A.C. Goal Line Remains Uncrossed in Third Game of Season. 

last Year's Defeat Avenged by Slashing Offense 

and Sterling Defense 



CROSS-COUNTRY TEAM 
DEFEATS WILLIAMS 



Former Intercollegiate Champions 
Trimmed by 21 — ,*6 Score. 



Judging Teams at 

Dairy Exposition 



Mann, Williams, and Budge Place 
Highest of M.A.C. Representatives. 



MAROON KEY INFORMAL 

AFTER W. P. I. CAME 



KLORICULTURAL CLUB MEETS 



At the meeting of the lloricultural Club 

last Thursday in Stockbridge Hall. 

i of two reels were shown of the 

Bth National Annual Flower Show 

in K.m-.is City. March 21. The film 

'"'■pared by the Pathe Company 

Under the auspices of the Society of 

American Florists and the Ornamental 

Horticultur.il Society. 



* MIS TO BE ADVISOR 

TO ACADEMIC MANAGERS 

Baoatary of the College Appointed 

'" New Position. 



First Informal of the 
Come October 24th. 



Season to 



Mr. Ralph J. Watts has bean appointed 

the Academic Activities Board as 

of academic managers. He will 

11 in in their business matters and 

<*l»er affairs which may arise from time 

His office hours will be on Tues- 

ty <\enings from 0.30 till <J in the 

ial Building. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Wednesday, Oct. 21 
Junior Class Smoker, Social Union 
Room, h p. m. 
«ty Cross-country. M.A.C. vs. 
■van at Middletown. 
Aggie Revue tryouts, Memorial 
Building, 8 p. m. 
Thursday, Oct. 22 
A "ibly, Stockbridge Hall, 

W p. m. 
Saturday, Oct. 24 
v <'' ty Football, M.A.C. vs. W.P.I. 

Alumni Field. 

Cross country, M.A.C. vs. 

W.P.I, here. 

'" Key Informal. Memorial 
'iuilding 4 p. m. 



The first informal of the college year 
will be held after the W.P.I, vs. MAC 
football game, October LM, by the Maroon 
Key Society. As this is the first function 
of its kind this year, main' couples are 

expected to be present. The music will 

Ik- furnished by Moon Mullin's Melodious 
Music Makers in charge of "Eddie" 

II.kkI. Miss Dietber will cater at 
Draper Hall. The committee is charge 

((insists of the Maroon Key membcr- 
hesded by "Alec" Hodson. president. 
Tickets may be obtained from any 
member of the Maroon Key Society. 
Those who exped to attend are asked to 
see some member of the Maroon Key as 
soon as possible regarding the chaperottes. 



Prof. Judkins Gets 

Leave of Absence 

Head of Dairy Department to be 
Production Manager for Eastern 
Dairies. 



Aggie placed lXth in the dairy cattle 
judging contest at the National Daiiv 
Exposition which was held during the 
week of October 12th, at lndian.t|x)lis. 
Iowa State Cottage won first place la this 
contest in which twenty-four teams wen 
entered. A. I. Mann *l»*i was fourth in 
judging Ayrshires and fifth in judging 
Holst.ins, while I). R. Williams 'Jg, 
placed ninth in Holsteins. The team was 
fifth in judging Ayrshires and tenth in 
judging Holsteins. 

I he Dairy Products judging team waf 
bJM fortunate, placing last in the list M 

ten teams. This contest was .,1m, uon |, y 

Iowa Stale C o tt ag e. The team did well, 
however, in judging milk, making fourth 
place wilh \\. K. Pudge 'I'ti tourth 
high man and A. I. Mann *98 seventh. 

Competition in both rontaats was «-**) 

keen. The results were announced at a 
large intercollegiate b.nnpiet at which the 
judging teams and dairy instructors from 
nearly c\ery state in the Union w.iv 
present. 

TWO-YEARS TRIM 

COMMERCE HIGH 

Truelson, Kelley and Tribe Star in 
12 — Shut-out. 



Prof. H. F. Judkins, head of the Dairy 
department, will on November 1st be 
granted a leave of absence for the re- 
mainder of the college year to accept the 
position of production manager for the 
Flastern Dairies with headquarters in 
Springfield. During this period, Prof. 
Judkins will continue to direct the 
activities of the department of dairying, 
spending one day each week at the College. 

Director Sidney B. Haskell of the 
Experiment Station has lieen elected to 
membership in the division of state 
relations of the National R esearch Coun- 
cil. The council has its office in Washing- 
ton and operates under a Federal charter. 
It has for its objective the studying and 
correlating of all research which acta 
directly or indirectly to promote the 
public welfare. 



Red Ball's well drilled Two- Year eleven 
v.in.piisli.d the highly touted Springfield 
Commerce team, conquerors of Druiv 
and llolyoke, at League Park last Friday 

by a ■core of 12 to for their first victory 

of the season. The Two- Years had played 
only one game previously, a ti t,, f, tie 
with Dattoa High on Columbus Day, 
and were not expected to iiiallre.it 

Commerce as they did, outplaying the 

Springfield boys throughout the game. 
The high school team was without the 
services of its star captain, Sornbcrgcr, 
who was pr ev e nte d from playing more 
than a few minutes by an injured ankle. 
For the Two-Years, Truelson, Kelley, and 
Tribe contributed the most outstanding 
features of the game. Both touchdowns 
came in the final quarter. 
The summary: 



The Aggie crosscountry team scored a 
decisive victory over Williams last Satin 
day on the M.A.C. course, winning l>\ .1 
store ol 21 .'{li, neail\ an exact reversal <>! 
the score at Williamstown two veais ago. 
when Williams overcame M.A.C. I!) .,7. 
Superior teamwork by the Aggie barriers 

spelled defeat far the Williams team, 

which included several members ol last 
year's champion New England team. 

CroftS, who finished eighth in the New 
England Intcn ollcgi.ites at boston last 
fall, crossed the line first, but he was 
closely pressed by Nottebaeit, who was 
followed by three other Aggies, Biron, 
Wheeler, and Captain B utlett. 

On Wednesday the M.A.C. team meets 

the strong Wesleyan outfit at Middletown, 
and on Saturday they will encounter 
W.P.I, here in a race which will probably 
be timed to finish between the halves ol 
the W.P.I, football game. Weslex an 

decisively conquered W.P.I, last Saturday 

and should be our strongest opponent on 

the basis ol comparative ■cores. Sununary 

of the Williams meet I 

1st, Crofts, Williams; 2d, Nottebaeit, 
M.A.C.; :id. Biron, M.A.C.; 4th, Wheeler. 
M.A.C; 5th, Haiti, it. M.A.C.; 8th, 

Fessenden, Williams; 7lh, Crooks, MA. 
('.; Nth, Childs, Williams; 9th, PrestOtt, 
M.A.C; Kith, Hfcchcock, Williams; I III., 
Fit< h, Williams; I2ih, N.illo.d, Williams; 
13th, Swan, .M.A.C. ; Mill, Adams, 
Williams. 

NORWICH DEFEATED IN 
LOOSELY PLAYED GAME 

Moberg and Hilyard Big Cutis in 
19 — Victory over Soldiers. 



The M.A.C. eleven shut out the Nor 

wirh gridsters, l<» to 0, in a loose!) 
played game on Alumni Field last week. 

The superior condition ol the Agates was 

displayed in this game to .111 even more 
milked degree than in their (lash with 
bates the pi, \ ious week. The home team 

was at all times the aggressive one but 
at limes ils punch was lacking when 
wit bin striking diStaiM e. 

The feral score mm mule early, when 
the Agates marched rapidly into Norwich 
territory. Moberg covered twenty-five 
yards <>n tackle and .1 feral down on the 
fifteen-yard line. Sullivma carried the 

ball over. 

A forward pass, Moberg to Hilyard, 

paved the way for the second MA ' 

touchdown. Hilyard was downed on tht 

< ..minuet un Page 4) 



Two- Year 

\ iale. le 
Ryan, It 
CofTrey, Ig 
Lovejoy, c 
Burgevin, rg 
Shelnut, rt 
Burrill, re 
Truelson, qb 
Tribe, lhb 
Massa, rhb 
Kelley, fb 



Commerce 

re, Newton 

rt, Mitchell 

rg, Stone 

c, Rosnick 

lg, Stanford 
It, Fredet te- 
le, Shastany 
qb, White 
rhb, Paige 
lhb, Davis 

fb, Greenberg 



Prexy Receives 
Faculty Members 

Two Hundred Knjoy President's 
Hospitality at "Hillside.' 



I he Mass. Aggie gridstsn shut , M it 
their opponents for the third time tins 
season when they blanked the Cons 

Aggie (liven |.{ ,„ On s,„ rrs |, |s| S(t(|| ' 
;'•", *** "••"" ^•|><.le's.,g,ega.,on 

broke into the win column rat the first 
time agamst M.A.t ., i, v dafentlng the 

Massachusetts team 12 ,„ ft, M()||l 

teams were composed ,,i ., irmjority of 
veterans and bath were after blood the 

Nutmeggers t„ keep ,,p ,|„. KO((( | wor| : l|l(| 
the Bay State, | ,„ . m . nv;( . ,_,„, ^^ 

downfall. 

The Connecticut ,,..„„ uas „ lltl) | ay0(| 

during the entire contest, bat they did 
effectively stop the hfaaaathttastts a.b 
rances ... the last half. However, the 

M V( , defense loomed up even when the 
offense WW Checked, C.A.C. neve, ,.„„,. 

'"•■'"•'- the visitors' goal than the forty 
yard line ....d tkej wicceedsd i.. making 
only 1 wo fust downs, Im.,1, |, v , h( . ()Vrr _ 

head route. 

I Onnecticut kicked off and the Bay 
Stale team advanced to Usl thirty-lne- 

x ' 1 " 1 l ""' I bstJI were forced to kick 

< One, punted i.mnediatelv .0 midfield" 
POUT tunes the M.A.C. warriors rushed 
the ball to within striking distance. 
Sullivan and Moberg plunging through 
""• Oefenclittg Ism behind good inter- 
ference lor long and consistent gabsl ,„,| v 
to be slopped con.plcelv as the defense 
grew dsspsrate. finally, however, in (he 
second quarter, ||„. Mass. Agates funded 

even nearer than before aj»dSuW van dove 
across the aero Btrine. 

Again the maroon j.ise\ed gridst.is 
'•'"i««l the ball inside ,| l( . fifteen vat. I 
mark, and again they were held for three 
downa. But on thf fourth down Moberg 
beuved a pass to Jones who had evaded 
;! " '1'i-u-ive baCkS and the t.,|| end 

touched the oval down. "Larry* 1 also 

kicked successfully lo, the SXtni |x'.int. 

bale in the period Conned iciil t , ,e,| 
•'■'ollensive Hash and s,„ , ceded i„ making 
a feral down on two forward passes. 

The MCOnd hall Was different, however. 

M A.( . kicked on snd then held Conn 

rar downs. Although „., long s*ssns wars 

'"•" ll ' the bill was pushed M ,|, r ( •„„„_ 

l """"" yard line, but it wm the Bsasa 
story as in the first period. The M \ I 

offense tried again ami again lo pier. | the 
'»|»|M,sing line Imt now the d.leiideis we,e 

immovable. The Cosmectkul offense 
wind, »ru exercised in the final | M -.iod 

■Uttered SVOa more. however. lour 

forward passing attempts sera Inter- 
cepted and at one time the Dolen,,,, w. ,«• 
held lor a net loss ol tl,,,.- j ,,ds m f, Ml r 
downs. Ih, ■scond first down ,. m .e when 

Schohsld ...mpieted ., twenty rard pses, 

1 be summary 



Touchdowns — Kelley, Tribe. Referee 
—Mann. Time— 15 minute periods. 
Substitutions: Two-Year — Johnson for 
CofTrey, Pesbody for Tribe, Trilx? for 
Peabody, Pealiody for Massa. Com- 
merce — Sornbcrger for Paige, Paige for 
Sornberger, Monahan for Shastony, 
Shastony for Monahan. 



The annual reception to the faculty and 

members of the slalf ol the College a«l 

held at "Hillside", the oAdal residence ol 

President Edward M. Lewis, last lrida\ 
'■veiling. President and Mrs. Lewis SCted 
as hosts and were assisted in the receiving 
line by Prof. Wallace F. Powers, oewl) 
elected head of the department of phySM I, 
and Mrs. Powers. Professor and Mrs. 
Powers repres e nted the new members of 
the faculty this year. 

About 2(XI passed through the receiving 
line between 8 and 10. Mrs. Joseph S. 
< hamberlain and Mrs. William M. 
M.u hmcr wire in charge of the dining 

room. Miss Grace Gattond, assisted by 

Mrs. Harlow Pendleton, presided at the 

punch table with Mrs. Clarence W. 

Gordon, Mrs. Samuel T. DsttS and Mrs. 
Alexander F. Cance serving. The recen* 

tion room was very beautifully decorated 
with ro s et, carnations, palms and autumn 
foliage used in profusion. 



Mass. Aggies 

' 00k, le 

< ..i\ in, It 

Black 

< ouhig, 1 
Thurlow, rg 
Amstein, rt 
|on< s, re 

' rustafson, <|b 
Sullivan, lhb 
Moberg. rhb 
Hilyard, lb 
s. on- by periods 

Mass. Aggies 



Conn. Aggies 
re, Finneman 

rt, /ollin 

rg, Johnson 

C, Daly 

Ig, Bitgood 

It , I.ongo 

le, Brink 

qb, St lioli.ld 

rhb, Mok laud 

lhb, Rimer 

fb, Nakofski 

12 8 4 Til. 

b'i 11 -18 



Touchdowns -Sullivan, [ones. Points 

from try alter tout Mown Jon. -, (place 
ki.k;. Reft 1.. Bankhart. Umpire - 
Keane. Head line-man Larkin. Tina - 
IS minute periods. Substitutions: Msss. 
Aggi«- Hi. mi lor Sullivan, Marx for 
Amstein, I uli nko for Bla. k, Ri. bardsea 

for Cook, Ni. hols for Hilyaid; Conn. 
Aggies Nanfiel.lt for Zollin, Horcnl 
for Johnson, Congo foi Nanf. Idt, Logan 
lor Prink. Allard for Si hol.eld. Fldy for 

I ilmer. 



Ol R OPPONENT S SCORES 



Brown IS, Bates 
Norwich ti, Tufts 
Submarine Case .'!.'}, Worcester 
Amherst 19, Hamilton {) 
Colby 81, Lowell Textile 
Springfield 6, Vermont 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. OCT. 21. 1925 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Editor-lnr( liief 
Managing Editor 



Mary T. Boyd 26 
Jqhn F. Lambert '26 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 




Editorial 


makv t. ita 


•26 


Cider Press 


Maky T. Boyd 


•2(3 


Athletics 


William L. Dole 


•2V 




Harold L. Clark 


'2« 


Campus News 


Raymond F. Difley 


'27 




Ellsworth Barnard 


'2H 




Josephine Panzica 


•2X 


Co- Ed News 


Frances C. Bruce 


'27 


Faculty News 


Ernest L. Spencer 


•2K 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Alvin G. Stevens "26 Business Manager 

Edwin A. Wilder'2S Advertising Manager 

Lewis H. Whitaker '27 Circulation Manager 

1 John E. White '27 

Douglas W. Loring '28 

Charles F. Clagg '27 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Poet Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



"Cheer, Boy*. Cheer—" 

One of the most striking things about 
the C.A.C. — M.A.C. game — aside from 
the novelty of hearing cheers for "Aggie" 
and having it mean encouragement for 
our opponents — was the excellent cheer- 
ing of the Connecticut Agates. They had 
no great number of rooters, certainly no 
more than M.A.C. turns out for a home 
game, but they crashed through their 
cheers in fine style, and between cheers 
they talked to their teams — and talked 
not in a spasmodic half hearted manner, 
hut with whole-hearted enthusiasm. The 
college backed their team — the spectators 
could feel it, and certainly the team must 
have felt it. And they were backing a 
losing team. 

Their performance niakrs our passive 

~~tt,.,«; asm all the more striking. We 

\\ui\ we are told to cheer. \\V talk 

he leader atyi "Talk it up, boy*. 

to them!" We clap our hands 

j after eat li date* and feel that our 

duty for the afternoon is done. And we 

are backing a winning team! The team 

is "(loinK their stuff." We are not. 

Our singing h good. Our bend is good. 

Our cheering is very bad. What to do? 
For one thing, cultivate a sense of indi- 
vidual responsibility. Don't wait for 
your neighbor to st.irt the talking. Don't 
let him do it all after it's started. Start 
it and do it yourself. The players cannot 
win a game on llie "Let George do it" 
basis- the speetators certainly cannot 
back the pla\ers by imitating the silent 
yell of the Write Correspondence College. 
Another thing— -0 short snappy cheer, 
like the C.A.C. "Ii«ht, fight" might help 
us. We need a direct expression of en 
thusiasm. Short! To the point! Em- 
phatic! In general, the rhythmical 
chants are most effective, — those that 
come to the lips almost unconsciously in 
the stress of excitement. Why not a 
fighting cheer for M.A.C.? Can't some 
one think up a good one before the Am- 
herst game? It might help appreciably to 
raise our cheering level. 



Right. Amherst Agricultural College. 

Well! 

To the Dean's office came a fond mother 
wishing to enter her boy. His credits 
were examined, found satisfactory, and 
he was duly registered. A schedule was 
made out, and mother looked it over. 
Her eye fell on a horrific word. "Agri- 
culture!" she exclaimed, "Why, John 
doesn't want to take agriculture. There's 
some mistake here." 

"No mistake," they told her. "All 
students at the Agricultural College are 
required to take Agriculture." 

Great consternation! An Agricultural 
college? Horrors! The lady didn't want 
her son to go to an agricultural college, 
She wanted him to go to Amherst. 

Then why had she brought him here? 
"Why," she explained, stopping in her 
flight to the nearest doorway, "We wanted 
John to go to Amherst. So we drove up 
in the car, and when we saw all the 
buildings naturally we thought it was the 
college. I never heard there was an 
agricultural school here too!" 

And off she ran. Incidentally, she came 
from as nearby a city as Springfield. 

Well? 

And finally, on the opening day of 
college an Abbey inmate heard a loud 
knocking on her door. On opening it, 
she was astonished to see a tall gray- 
haired man standing there. 

"Can you tell me where James Jones' 
room is," he asked her. 

"Jane Jones?" she said. "Why no — is 
she a Freshman?" 

"She," he exploded, "he. My son, 
James Jones. He lives at the dormitory 
here in Amherst. There seems to be an 
awful lot of women around though." 

"This is the woman's dormitory," she 
explained. 

"Didn't know women went to Amherst. 
You mean that there are no men rooming 
here at all?" 

Restraining with difficulty a desire to 
tell him that men boarders lived in tents 
on the rooftop, she assured him that 
there were no men in the dormitory at 
all, that this was not Amherst, and that 
it was the woman's dormitory of M.A.C. 
He looked unconvinced, and went off 
muttering "Never heard of women at 
Amherst. Never heard of any M.A.C. 
1 1 '■> all a lot of darn foolishness." 

Yes, — isn't it? 



RESOLUTIONS 
WHEREAS, The (Colony Klub has 

sustained a loss by the death of our 
fellow member and associate Ldward C. 
Rom, and a still heavier loss has been 
sustained by those who were nearest and 
dearest to him; therefore, Ik 1 it resolved, 
that it is but a just tribute to the memory 
of our brother to say that in regretting 
hi-* removal from our midst we mourn 
for one who was, in every way, worthy 
of our respect and esteem. 

Resolved, that we sincerely condole 
with his family, on the dispensation which 
it has pleased Divine Providence to give 
to them, and commend them for conso- 
lation to Him who orders all things for 
the Inst, and whose Chastisement! are 

meant in mercy. 

Resolved, that this heartfelt testimonial 
of our sympathy and sorrows be forwarded 
to the family of our Brother, and a copy 
be spread on. the records of our club, and 
a copy be forwarded to the Massachusetts 
Collegian. 

Committee on Resolutions, 

(Signed) Gerald Hyde, President 

Alexander Nash, Secretary 




Sidelights on the Conn. Aggie Game. 



Prize Joke ! 

Aggie Student (M): Where are the 
M.A.C. bleachers? 

Aggie Student (C): The losing side's 
right over this way! 



They sold programs for the game — 
giving line-ups, records, and a variety of 
other pertinent information. Also there 
were pictures; so that when Coach 
"Dolly" Dole crossed the field, spectators 
could be heard saying, "Look. That 
must be Dole — looks just like his picture, 
anyway." 

It made things much more interesting 
and homelike for the visitors. Wonder if 
there isn't a hint in it for us? 



C.A.C. has a variation of the campus 
coat that makes the local efforts look 
like water-colors in a Futurist exhibit. 
Plaid, in staring blocks of vivid color! 
When the wearer crossed the field, she 
went like a comet, trailing a shower of 
comments after her. 



The more we heard of the C.A.C. band, 
the more highly we regarded our own. 
Still — they were only organized the day 
before, which may explain some of the 
differences of opinion as to just what the 
key really was. 



Freshmen, congratulate yourselves on 
your modest and inconspicuous caps. 
You might have gone to Conn. Aggie and 
had to wear a cap like a layer cake — blue 
on top and green below, with the usual 
button perched airily atop, and the 
whole affair having about the size and 
contours of a Hash House soupbowl. 



Coach "Kid" Gore has as many extra- 
ordinary varieties of head-gear as has a 
movie star. This latest — a cross between 
a fireman's helmet and a sou'wester — was 
one of the features of the game, vying 
with the above mentioned coat for first 
place in popular consideration. 



This IS Amherst Aggie ' 

Two Aggie men stood at the street 
corner and waited for a ride. After a 
few minutes a good-looking car stopped 
and the driver said "Want ■ lift, boys?" 
Then, when they were on their way again, 
he turned to them and said, "Do you go 
to Amherst Aggie?" 

Said they, "No, Mass. Aggie." 
Said he, "Didn't know there were two 
agricultural colleges in Amherst," and 
when informed that he was quite right. 
there were not, he said tolerantly, "I 
see. You call it Mass. Aggie too, do you? 
They told him that there was nothing 
but Mass. Aggfa — told him very firmly, 
and then he said, "You boys don't know 
what yott're talking about. It's Amherst 
Aggie. 1 ought to know haven't I a 
daughter there?" 
Well? 

A certain professor requires, for a (lass 
exercise, letters, ostensil ly written home, 
describing impressions of college life. 
This exercise conies in late October, after 
the Frosh have been here for a month or 
so. That should be time enough for them 
to learn what college they are attending, 
— but how were several letters headed? 



TWO YEAR NOTES 

The Two Year senior class has elected 
the following officers for the rest of the 
term: president, Charles Parker of East 
Orleans; vice president, Elisabeth Rowell 
of (iroton; secretary, Janet Whitcomb of 
Haverhill; and treasurer, W. W. Mc- 
Cullock of Salem. 



On October 9th, the M.A.C.C.A. gave 
a reception in the Memorial Building, for 
the Two Yea* freshmen. The Two Year 
seniors gave their freshmen a reception 
on October Kith, at which Director and 
Mrs. V e rb e ch , Mr. and Mrs. Ranta, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Yiets were chaperones. 



THE CAMPUS WHO'S WHO 



2. Mathematical Interchange 

When two classes are held simultane- 
ously on the ground floor of the Math, 
building — one on each side of a very thin 
partition — and when the partition is 
rendered still more effective as a sound 
conductor by a large hole cut through to 
permit passage of the steam pipes which 
give the Math, building its particularly 
somnolent atmosphere, strange things 
happen. This little story witnesses that 
fact. 

On one side of the partition is Dean 
Machmer and class, struggling with the 
mysteries of "analyt"; on the other side, 
Prof. Ostrander is initiating another class 
into the intricacies of "stresses, strains, 
and how they get that way." (The phrase 
is the class', — don't blame the prof!) 

Prof. Ostrander has just asked the 
class a question. The class is saying 
nothing, and deep silence reigns. On the 
other side of the partition is silence just 
as deep. Dean Machmer has also asked 
a question. Prof. Ostrander says im- 
patiently, "Well — what's the answer — 
what's the answer?" and just then Prof. 
Machmer's voice comes through clearly 
and briskly with "Absolute zero." 

And that, as Boob McNutt says, "ain't 
no joke neither." 



New research instituted at the Experi- 
ment Station under the terms of the 
National l'urnell Act includes a study of 
the export market of the Massachusetts 
and New, England apple industry under 
Prof. Lorian P. Jefferson, a study of the 
taxation of agricultural values under 
Prof. Hubert W. Yount and a study of 
the problems connected with Dairy 
manufactures under Prof. Arthur W. 
Phillips. The work will soon be expanded 
to include investigation in Horticultural 
manufactures. 



And finally — the Connecticut Agricul- 
tural College has a gymnasium! 

CP 

Our Very Dumb Friends 

If Ernest Thompson-Seton: Seton- 
Thompson (he varies it according to the 
season), could only visit us for a few days, 
he would find much material for a new- 
nature book. Leaving out our pampered 
campus squirrels, who have already re- 
ceived more than their share of publicity, 
and omitting (we wish we could!) the 
hordes of the vicious class-room Musca- 
domestica, we could offer for the natural- 
ist's visual, and especially for his 
olfactory, inspection a choice collection 
of cats. Very special cats, striped black 
and white, and living, most of the time, 
in the woods. The rest of the time, on 
campus. 

It seems too bad that there is no way 
to tell them that "That's the insidious 
thing" iibout them! 

CP 

Prize Incident of the Week 
Scene — Music counter in a crowded 
department store. Enter three co-eds, 
bent on purchasing a certain sheet of 
music. They come to the counter and 
make inquiries of the saleswoman. Now 
the saleswoman is very deaf and although 
she wears one of those portable phone 
arrangements, it doesn't help much. 

First Co-ed (very sweetly) — Have you 
got "Just a Little Drink?" 
Saleswoman — What? 
Co-ed (a little louder) — I said: have 
you got "Just a Little Drink?" 
A clerk in the next aisle snickers. 
Saleswoman — Sorry, but I didn't hear 
what you wanted. 

Co-ed (much louder) — "Just a Little 
Drink." 
Several customers stop and laugh openly 
Saleswoman — Hovering on the Brink? 
No, I haven't goc that. 

Co-ed (very red and very determined 
and very, very mad) — I want "JUST A 
LITTLE DRINK." 

And amid the loud general laughter, 
the saleswoman smiles sweetly and the 
co-ed gets her sheet of music. 

CP 

Something New 
"The way to a man's heart is through 
this newly-shaped, long, thin rectangular 
wrist-watch." 

— Department store advertisement. 

CP 

And that's that! 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 21, 1925 



AT THE ABBEY 



On f October 6, the Y.W.C.A. gave an 
informal reception to the Two Year 
freshman girls. Refreshments were 

served and "a good time was enjoyed by 
all." 

M 

Dorothy Drake '26 and Lucia Fuller 
Two Year '27, are at the infirmary. 
M 

Sunday afternoon, Ruth Putnam am] 
Elsie Nickerson, representing the local 
Y.W.C.A., served tea at the old ladies' 
home in North Amherst. They wen; 
assisted by Donald Campbell and Carl 
Frazer, who sang. 

M— 

Monday was the day of reckoning for 
the freshman girls. As a result, all of 
them observed a period of "silence" 
from 12 p. in. Monday night to 12 p. in. 
on Tuesday night. This is one of the 
innovations in sophomore- fresh man re- 
lations. 



COMMUNICATION 

October 8, 1925. 
The Editor of the 

Collegian. 
Dear Sir: 

The author of the editorial entitled 
"The English Slanguage" has brought up 
a question which merits a little more 
serious consideration than is accorded it 
in his rather flippantly written article, 
in which the use of good English is arily 
dismissed as though it were of no value 
or importance. If one is deficient in so 
fundamental a matter as the proper use 
of his mother tongue, can he justly lay 
claim to either culture or refinement? Is 
such a person capable of taking the place 
in any community, to which his training 
and attainments might otherwise entitle 
him? 

When a man seeks to meet the worth- 
while people in any community, they in- 
variably judge him by his appearance, 
his manners, and his speech — and his 
■peach is perhaps the most reliable index 
of his cultural status. Such a person 
would not think of selecting the street- 
loafer as his sartorial model, yet he all too 
frequently models his speech after that 
of the street-loafer (whose "cooky-pusher" 
clothes he affects to disdain), and he then 
wonders why he is not accepter! as a 
social equal by those whose society he 
seeks to cultivate. 

The writer of the above-mentioned 
editorial seems to think that one must 
cultivate a ponderously stilted style in 
order to speak or write correctly, but such 
an opinion is the result of ignorance or in- 
experience. Cultured people do not seek 
to impress others with their erudition, 
nor do they employ the mincing expression 
popularly attributed to them in the 
motion-picture "inserts", or in the comic 
supplement of the Sunday papers. Such 
an opinion regarding the speech of cul- 
tured people would be expected of a fac- 
tory girl, rather than of a college student! 
Furthermore, I cannot agree with the 
editorial writer in his contention that, 
despite slovenly habits of speech, "When 
you really want good English, you have 
it!" At least, the grammatical errors 
in the first paragraph of his editorial, 
would seem to refute his complacent 
assumption that one can write correctly 
when one wishes to exert ones' self, 
despite the handicap of slovenly habits 
of speech! 

I would not maintain that all slang 
expressions should be eliminated from 
one's ordinary conversation, for many 
such expressions are both apt and forceful, 
and in rare instances they may express 
an idea for which no other word or phrase 
is available. On the other hand, the con- 
tinual use of slang, and other illiterate 
expressions, usually indicates a culpable 
mental laziness (or even downright 
ignorance) on the part of those who 
habitually resort to it, and the effect of 
such usage is neither beneficial nor up- 
lifting. If the young people of today 
continue to model their mode of expression 
upon that of the average street-loafer, it 
is hardly to be expected that their ideas 
or ideals will rise above their mode of 
expression. The pessimistically inclined 
among us may likewise feel that if the 
so-called "educated" young people of 
today insist upon casting aside the 
precious heritage of their mother tongue, 
along with the other worth-while tradi- 



COLLIDGE'S PLEA FOR 
TOLERANCE 

Following out President Lewis' suggestion in 
Monday chapel, the Collkg'an takes great pleas- 
ure in giving to its readers excerpts from the 
" Omaha " speech to ponder over and make a part 
of their thought. The message is peculiarly timely 
to us, inasmuch as our watchword for the year is 
that same word " Tolerance." 

One of the most natural of reactions 
during the war was intolerance. But the 
inevitable disregard for the opinions and 
feelings of minorities is none the less a 
disturbing project of war psychology. 
The slow and difficult advance which 
tolerance and liberalism have made 
through long periods of development are 
dissipated almost in a night when the 
necessary wartime habits of thought hold 
the minds of the people. The necessity 
for a common purpose and a united in- 
tellectual front becomes paramount to 
everything else. 

But when the need for such a solidarity 
is past there should be a quick and 
generous readiness to revert to the old 
and normal habits of thought. There 
should be an intellectual demobilization 
as well as a military demobilization. 

In this period of after-war rigidity, 
suspicion and intolerance, our own coun- 
try has not been exempt from unfortunate 
experiences. Among some of the varying 
racial, religious antl social groups of our 
people there have been manifestations of 
an intolerance of opinion, a narrowue^ 
of outlook, a fixity of jud^nu'nt, against 
which we may well be warned. It is not 
easy to conceive of anything that would 
be more unfortunate in a community 
based on tin- ideals of which Americans 
boast than any c msiderable development 
of intolerance as regards religion. 

Whether one traces his Americanism 
back three centuries to the Mayflower, 
or three years to the steerage, is not halt 
so important as whether his Americanism 
of today is real and genuine. No matter 
by what devious crafts we came here, 
we are all now in the same boat. 
• * * • * 

We shall only be entering a period of 
preparation for another conflict unless st 
can demobilize the racial antagonisms 
fears, hatreds and suspicions, and create 
an attitude of tolerations in the public 
mind of the peoples of the earth. 

Let us cast off our hatreds. Let us 
candidly accept our treaties and our 
natural obligations of peace. We know, 
and everyone knows that these old 
systems, antagonisms and reliances on 
force have failed. 

If the world has made any progress, it 
has been the result of the development of 
other ideals. If we are to maintain and 
perfect our own civilization, if we are to 
be of nay benefit to the rest of mankind, 
we must turn aside from the thoughts ot 
destruction and cultivate the thought^ ol 
reconstruction. We can not place our 
main reliance upon material forces. We 
must reaffirm and reenforce our ancient 
faith in truth and justice, in charitable- 
ness and tolerance. 

We must make our supreme commit- 
ment to the everlasting spiritual forces ot 
life. We must mobilize the conscien 
mankind. 

tions and ideals which they seem intent 
upon trampling underfoot, then indeed 
is this the beginning of the night ot 
barbarism, which so many prophets M* 
predicted will blot out our we -tern 
civilization! 

G. C. Crampton 



'20 Charles F. Doucette has charge 



o! 



the Bulb Insect Field Station of the 
U.S.D.A., Bureau of Entomology, loc ated 
at Santa Cruz, California. 



*hey make you go to chapel, 

but you come to Walsh 

from choice. 




The magic touch of the Craftsman Tailor 
is found in the cutting as well as the needle- 
work in each Scheyer Suit. "Tom" is here to 
sell you quality suits at a reasonable price. 
See and Compare 



For Men who Demand Style— 

You will find nothing more satisfac- 
tory than one of our new Fall suits 
that we have just unpacked. The 
price you will find reasonable as is true 
of everything that we sell. 

Winter Overcoats are also ready. Pick 
yours out now while the assortment 
is at its best. 



F. M. Thompson & Son 



Keep In Touch With 
FOOTBALL NEWS 



BY READING 



THE 




AMOUS 
RIDAY 
OOTBALL 
ORECAST 



Appearing Weekly in the 

infitmt luttimn Srattarript 

Survey of the CoHege_and School Gridiron 
Activities, - with intimate stories of the de- 
velopment of the leading elevens of the East 



JAMES A. LOWELL 



BOOKSELLER 



AMHERST 



MASS. 



HALLOWEEN NOVELTIES 
Place Cards and Seals 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

tY AND FANCY GOODS 



READY TO WEAR 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Sophomores Win 
Interclass Meet 



Score 43 Points Against 21 for 
Freshmen. Fewer Entries than 
Usual. 



The sophomores won the interclass 
track iiK-i't lasrt Saturday, October 17, !>v 
scoring 4.3 points, 22 more than their 
nearest competitors, the freshmen, who 
acquired 21. A smaller number of entries 
than usual was received and the events 
were run off in a high wind. A very credi- 
table showing was made by Schappelle 
'28, Hall '28, and Henderson '29 in the 
long runs, and by Kay '29 in the 100- 
yard dash. 

The summary: 

Mile run — Won by Schappelle '28; 
Tobey '28, second; Roper '28, third. 
Time, Ml. 

100-yard dash— Won by Kay '29; 
Elemings '28, second. Time, 10 4-5s. 

440-yard run— Won by Hall "28; 
Davis '29, second; Hunter '29 third. 
Time, 60 l-5s. 

120-yard low hurdles — Won by Flem- 
ings '28; Tufts '28, second; McKittricIt 
'29 third. Time 15 3-5s. 

880-yard run— Won by Schappelle '28; 
Campbell '27, second; Foley '27, third. 
Time, 2.18 2-5. 

Three-mile cross country run — Won by 
Henderson '29; Owers '28, second; 
Roper '28, third. Time 18.30. 

High jump — Won by Blomquist '28, 
height 5ft. 2in.; Hall '28, and Kay '29, 
tied for second, 5ft. lin. 

Broad jump— Won by Hall '28, dis- 
tance 18ft. 4in.; Coukos '29, second, 
16ft. 9in.; Davis '29, third, 16ft. 3in. 



The Best In Drug Store Merchandise 

The Best in Drug Store Service 

HENRY ADAMS & CDMPANY 

T*» 3&*clL Star* 



CONNELL IS DELEGATE TO 

INTERFRAT. CONFERENCE 



Sigma Phi Epsilon Man will go to 
National Meeting in New York Next 
Month. 



A meeting of the Interfraternily (on 
ft ft ft w.i> held last Thursday night at 
which Edward Connell, of Sigma I'hi 
Epsilon fraternity was ele c t ed as delegate 

to the National Interfraternity Con fen in t 
meeting at New York, on November 27 
and 28. Joseph Hilyard, Q.T.V. fraternity 
was elected alternate. 

The National Interfraternity Confer- 
ence sponsors these meetings with dele 
Kates from the local interfraternity con- 
ferences through the country. They 
will meet together at the Hotel Pennsyl- 
vania, New York City. 

Topics for discussion at the next 
meeting were brought up last Thursday 
night. Chief anions these t'opics was the 
consideration at the next meeting of Phr 
desirability of a second term rush inn 
season. 



ACADEMIC CREDIT SYSTEM 

The COLLEGIAN wishes to explain the 
system of credits given for participation 
in academic activities for the benefit of 
freshmen and others who are not ac- 
quainted with the system. Academic 
medals are awarded on a credit basis 
which has an arbitrary minimum, but 
the Academic Activities Board exercises 
to some degree the privilege of granting 
extra credit where exceptional service IbM 
been rendered. A gold medal is awarded 
on the accruing of five credits in a single 
activity or six in combination. Silver 
medals are awarded for three and four 
credits on the same basis. Students who 
are interested in the details or in their 
personal records for academic work, are 
urged to see Professor Rand for further 
explanation. 



'25 D. O. Fish is doing landscape work 
on golf courses in Florida. 



DNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and' Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



FRESHMEN SOPHOMORES JUNIORS SENIORS ATHLETES 

Do You Know? 
"HOW TO STUDY * 

The Students' Hand-Book of Practical Hlnta on the Technique ot 

Effective Study 
by WILLIAM ALLAN BROOKS 
A GUIDE ront.iiniii.; huiidriils of practical Mat] and short MM in the 
«^"".'". n ..."' '•••"'""K •" -'""'"i ■tudenU in securing MAXIMUM SCHOLASTIC 
KKSt I, I S .il .1 mimimiiii tost of linn-, aaefgy, MM tatigae. 

ESPECIALLY RECOMMENDED for overworked tlllwtl an.l athlete 
engaged In tatra curriculum activities .mil for average and honor students who 

an- working for high scholastic achievement. 

Some of the Topics covered 

Dlef During Athletic Training. 
How to Study Modern Language*. 
How to Study Science, Literature, 

ate. 

Why Oo to College? 

After College. What? 

Deretoatag Concentration and 

KfnVlency. 
The Athlete and Ills Studies, 
etc., etc., etc., etc., etc., etc., 

Why You Need This Guide 

"It is ■aft. in mv thai fatiart to guide aad direct stady h tag avail petal la 
tat whole eduoaUoaal bmm mm. Prof. G. M, Whipple, University 01 Mi< higan 

•'Tin- laccaaaful men in cottage do nm seeat to !«• rant nappy, Moat ><\ taeat 

i.illy the athletes are overworked " Prof, list aoby. Vale. 

"Miadirei tad labor, though honest and weU tateattoaed amy lead t.i naught 
Among the most Important things lot the student to Irani la bow to study With- 
out knowleiineot i In- aislaoM may at largely 1" vain Prof. G. K. Swain, if, I. T. 

"To students who have mvci Isarat "Hoa to Btadr/'work li vary ortai .1 
1 in-iiMement. a Hani llai ion, and m bwaprrablc obetai It to contentment I'mf 

A [agU*i Il.iiyarcl. 

"HOW TO STUDY" «iii aaoai you how toavaU all aaaaaaetad atari 



Scientific Shortcuts In Effective 

Study. 
Preparing for Examinations. 
Writing Good Eiaminatlona. 
Brain and Digestion In Relation 

to Study. 
How to Take I <•> t ure and Reading 

Notes. 
Advantages and Dl«ad\ an luges of 

Cramming. 



Get a good start and mnke this year a highly successful one by scnilmg 
this haml -hook atul guule .N<MV. 






for 



CLIP 

AND MAIL 
TODAY 



You Need This Intelligent Assistance 



Amerhan Student Pui.lisheis, 
22 West ttrtl St. New YorV. 

t .1 ill Iiiihm: 

H.-ase -nil me I ,opy of ' H„ w to Study" f„ r 

win. 1. 1 enclose ft.OOi i-h, «i.m. 1 

Name 

Address 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST & DEACON. Prop.. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

HOT WAFFLES and MAPLE SYRUP (Oh! so good) 
SANDWICHES COFFEE DOUGHNUTS 

Sundaes Milk Shakes Sodas 

DEUEL'S 



Everything 

the new 
student needs 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

IN THE M BUILDING 



Pens 
Paper Supplies 

Stationery 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherit, Mait 

Our Laundry First Clast 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OP 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
■ K IvjKS. 

Opposite Poet Office 



«v 




There is one thing we like to shout about. 

The suit models bought with a Carl H. Bolter label in it are so distinctly different and smooth 
that you can tell in one glance that it is no ordinary stock suit. Which most stores sell. 

Amherst CARL H. BOLTER Hyannis 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 21. 1925 



Town Hall, Amherst 


Wed. 

ant! 

Thurs. 

3.00. 7.30 


CAPTAIN BLOOD" by 
Kufael Sabatlni, author of 
"Scaramouch*" and "The 
Sen Hawk" with J. Warren 
Kerrlftati, Jean I'alU* Chur- 
lotte Merrlam, Jame« Mor- 
rltton. Allan Forrest and 
wplendid cast. A tomantlc 
drama uf lUu < aiu-er Daya. 
News Fable* c;omedy 


Friday 

3.00, 6.45 
8.30 


Hebe IMiii.-ls and Rod l.a- 
Kocque In 

"WILD. WILD SUSAN" 

Come prepared for plenty of 
fun and excitement. 

Sportllftht Comedy 


Saturday 

3 00. 4.45 
8.30 


Tom Mil andTony In 

"TIIF. F.VF.KI.ASTINC 
WIIIM'I-.K " 

Finer, blftfter, better than 
ever before. 

News Comedy 


Mon. 

3.00, 6.45 
8.30 


Claire Windsor. Bert l-y- 

i.ll < allien land is and 
Doris Keuyon In 

" BORN RICH" 

I'athe Review Comedy 



YE AGGIE INN 

OPERATED BY THE STUDENTS 



(SERVICE) OPERATED BY ihk aiuuMNia (QUALITY) 

National Note Books, Stationery, Parker, Waterman, Conklin, Chilson fountain pens, Toilet articles. 

" Everything the student needs for the class-room or his person." 

R. B. Sawyer '26 R. H. White '26 R. Hintze '29 V. Teff t '29 



A. H. Doolittle '26 



NORWICH DEFEATED 

Continued from 1'afte 1) 

Norwich ten-yard Um from where Moberg 
went through the line for the eount. 
[cues place-kicked for the extra point. 

Ilaertl made the last tally m the third 

quarter when he e merg ed from a hopdaaa 

looking tangle of limbs, dodged tin- 
soldiers' secondary defense, and gained a 

clear field running twenty yards to the 

goal line. 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUNSINGWEAR and MEDALIA 

SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $U9 $1.75 

G. Edward Fisher 



The summary. 

M.A.C. 
Cook, le 
< ■ avcil, It 
Mack, 1« 
Couhtgi c 
Thurlow, rg 
Marx, rt 
Jones, re 

Moberg, qb 

Sullivan, Ihb 
C.ustafson, rhb 
Ililyard, fb 

Socre by period* 
M.A.C 



Norwich 

re, Surwatki 

rt. Fiaher 
rg, Brooks 

C, Crowley 

lg, Kendall 

It, Molter 

le, Hourin 

qb, Kane 

rhb, Rice 

Ihb, Sherman 
fb, Connor 
1 2 8 4 Ttl. 
13 t) (i — 10 



WITH THE FACULTY 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one fllftht) 

Oculists Prencrlpllon* Filled. Broken lenses 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Walt 

NEW PRICES 

Men's Whole Soles, Rubber Heels - - - tt-55 

Men's Half Soles. Rubber Heels - - - 1-75 

Men's RuI>Iht Soles. Rubber Heels - • 2 2? 

Mens Half Soles »••*• 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOl'SE 
Open till 8 P. M. 



Touchdowns— Sullivan, Moberg, Haertl 
Point from try after touchdowns — Jones. 
Referee -A. G. Johnson, Springfield; 
Umpire— T. Shea, Boston I'niversity. 
Head linesman— J. P. Whalen, Spring- 
field. Time— 15 minute periods. Sub- 
stitutions: M.A.C— Nichol for Sullivan, 
Haertl for Nichol, Smith for Cook, Malley 
for Smith, baker for Thurlow, Trull for 
Baker, Tulenko for Black, Quinn for 
( .ustafson. Norwic h -- Maher for Connor, 
( .rittin for Kendall, Andrews for Surwatki. 
O'Donnell for Sherman, Daly for Criffin. 



Mr. Raymond llalliday, instructor in 
the department of French, spent the 
summer months travelling in Kurope. 
lie devoted most of his time though to 
-iiidy at the diversity of Crenobles 
in the heart of the Alps. 

I'rof. Edgar L, Ashley of the depart- 
ment of German also pursued g radu a te 

study at the I'niversity of (ircnobh-s 
this past summer. 

Mr. Bclding F. Jackson attended the 

Summer School of English at Breadloaf, 
Vermont, during July and August. 

Miss Helena T. (ioessman, instructor 
of Knglish, has returned to the College 
after a leave of absence of one year. She 
has recovered her sight sufficiently to 
enable her to continue her work. 

I'rof. Frank P. Rand wrote and directed 
the anniversary pageant which was pre- 
sented as a part of the semi-centennial 
celebration of the founding of Cushing 
Academy, Ashburnham, last June. 

Dr. Joseph S. Chamberlain, professor 
of organic and agricultural Chemistry, 
spent the summer months writing a 
manuscript at his summer home in Maine. 

Professor Alexander A. Mackimmie has 
In-en transferred from professor of French 
and Kconomics to professor of Economics 
and Sociology. During the summer he 
took graduate courses in Economics at 
Columbia University. 



Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the best In everything 



B OSTON1HNS 

— sfi^ aaaas^saaainaai^aa aanOBSMSaw ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Shoes that fit — 

— Style that stays 

The Correct College Shoe 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 



MAIN STREET 



AMHERST 



WANTED 

Aggie Students to attend our Exhibit of 

COLLEGE SHOES and HOSIERY 



AT 



AGGIE INN - Wednesday, Oct. 21, 1925 
See our Trojan Brogues at $5.00 

THOMAS S. CHILDS 

(INCORPORATED) 

275 HIGH ST., - - HOLYOKE 

HARRY B. BERMAN, 1920 



C. A. NOTES 

Mr. John B. Hanna is conducting a 
course on the Life of Jesus of Nazareth 
at the First Congregational Church every 
Sunday after the morning service. This 
class meets at 12 and ends promptly at 
12.40, so that any student may got to 
the Dining Hall in time for dinner. There 
are now about forty students in this class, 
with room for twenty or thirty more, 
and as many as possible are invited to 
attend. 

The annual reception to the freshmen 
of the two year course was held in the 
Memorial Building, Friday, October 9th, 
at seven o'clock. 



FRESHMAN RECEPTION 

President Lewis gave a reception to the 
members of the freshman class at his 
home last Saturday evening. A feature 
of the evening was a talk given by Rev. 
Mr. Kinsolving. Refreshments were ser- 
ved and the party broke up after a very 
pli.i-ant evening. 



A recent business organization in 
Pennsylvania is of special interest to 
Aggie people. This is a new corporation 
tinder the title of Wyomissing Nurseries 
Company, at Wyomissing, Pennsylvania. 
The president of the new company is 
Lester W. Needham, M.A.C. 1914, and 
the vice-president is Charles M. Board- 
man, M.A.C. 1920. This is one of the 
most famous nurseries in America and 
considered one of the best. It was built 
up by the late Bertrand H. Farr, with 
whom Mr. Needham worked for several 
years as superintendent. Mr. Boardman 
has been acting as landscape gardener 
with this firm but now becomes general 
sales manager. Donald C Nowers, 
M.A.C. 1923, is with the same firm as 
landscape gardener. 



WRKLEYS 

AFTER 



•U, EVERY 





MEAL 



.i. "nat 



affords 

benefit as well 

as pleasure. 

Healthful exercise for the teeth 
and a spur to digestion. A long, 
lasting refreshment, soothing to 
nerves and stomach. 

The Great American 
Sweetmeat, untouched 
by hands, full of 
flavor. 




Book - Ends 



You will find an excellent 

. . . SHOK REPAIRING SHOP . . . 

equipped with the most up-to-date Coodyear 

Mm hlnerj and a modern 

SHOE SHINING PARLOR 

at Hi Amity-Si.. - Labrovltz Block 

We understand \our requirements and are pre- 
pared to meet your needs. 
All work guaranteed. Shoes shined and dyed. 

VINCENT GRANDONICO, Prop. 



Former Director William P. Brooks and 
Director Sidney B. Haskell of the Experi- 
ment Station attended the annual meeting 
of the northern Atlantic experiment 
station directors at New Haven, Conn. 
Among those present were Dr. E. W. 
Allen '85 of Washington, D. C, Dr. H. 
J. Wheeler *tt of Boston. Dr. J. L. Hills 
'SI of Burlington, Vt., and Dr. B. L. 
Hart well '89 of Kingston, R. I. 



'1>."> G. J. Haeussler is doing govern- 
ment work in entomology, at Palmyra, 
New Jersey. 



FROM 



WANTED: A man between the age of 25 and 35 to 
represent us in Northampton to take the place of H. E. 
Robbins, a former teacher at M.A.C, whom we recently 
promoted to manager in eastern Connecticut. Several 
teachers whom we have hired in the past two or three 
years have been very successful with us. Unusual oppor- 
tunity for the right man. 

HARRY E. BARLOW, Manager 
Connecticut General Life Ins. Co. 
387 Main St. 

Springfield, Mass. 



$1.00 to $15.00 

—AT— 

MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 

THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

Hunting Season is here and we can 
supply your needs in Guns and Sheik 
Call for your free copy of Game laws 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 
RE\R AMHERST BANK 

WE ARE READY FOR THE 

JWNTING SEASON! 

Also, all kinds of Rubber Footwear 
always carried in stock. 
HOSIERY a Specialty 

fOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOK STORK 

TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 

COLLEGE SHOES 

TOWN PRICES 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 

S a/t« 

DRURY'S 

College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKER! 



Headquarters For Style, Service and Satisfaction — m m ^ ble 

For the man who would be well groomed, and correctly attired, who would have the admiration of his friends and the peace of mind that goes witn 
merchandise we offer an unlimited array of authentic and exclusive clothing and haberdashery for particular college men. 
For every day wear around campus a black crew neck sweater is both sightly and practical. We have plenty. 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



SH|g HaaaarfruarttB ffiflllrmat? 



Vol. xxxvi. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, OCT. 28, 1925 



No 



INDEX PICTURES 
THIS WEEK-END 



\|| Pictures for 1927 Year Book to 
l„. Taken Saturday, Sunday and 
Monday. Punctuality will be In- 
sisted Upon. 



I ollowtiif, is the schedule for Indtx 

picture! to BO taken next Saturday. 

October Met, Sunday, November 1st. 
iin ,l Monday. November 2nd. This year 
,tu\ will be echeduJed cloeely together, 
consequeatly all groups will do well to 

i Continued on Page 4; 

Many Try Out 
For Aggie Revue 

Donald 11. Campbell and Marion 
Cassidy to Take Leading Parts. 



An exceptionally large number of com- 
petitors turned out for the Aggie Revue 
try-outs which were held in Memorial 
Hall last Wednesday evening at eight 
o'clock The leading parts in the musical 
comedy were given to Marion Cassidy 
_'ii. of M.A.C.C.A. show fame, and 
Donald Campbell, a sophomore. Miriam 
lliiss '2S will take the part of Gladys, 
the jealous sister; Raymond A. Plumber 
fj will play opposite her. Professor and 
Mrs. t'arrington will be well represented 
by Kniery Loud '26 and Evelyn Davis 
Jt, Kenneth A. Bartlett '28, the perfect 
English butler, has been chosen to "do 
his stuff" again. Miss Davis and Bartlett 
took part in last year's revue and we look 
forward to seeing them again, both in 
roles for which they are most noted. 
Anne Hinchey '29, as the maid, completes 
the list of the successful competitors. 

\> yet, the chorus for the comedy has 
■Ot been definitely decided upon but it is 
expected that final eliminations will In- 
made after the first few rehearsals. 



Maroon Key Holds 

Successful Informal 



Forty Couples Attend Season's First 
Big Social Event. Moon Mullin 
Makes Debut. 



The first informal of the season, held 
la-t Saturday after the Worcester Tech 
Ranie, under the auspices of the Maroon 
Key, proved an unqualified success. 
About forty couples attended, the girls 
brief drawn almost entirely from Mt. 
Holyoke and the Abbey. 

Moon Mullin and his Melodious Music- 
Makers, playing for their first informal, 
furnished excellent music. Pyle's cornet 
work was especially noteworthy. Supper 
eu RTved at Draper Hall, and the menu 
I welcome relief from the usual 
chicken patties. Although considerable 
time w,i» lost because of not eating in the 
Memorial Building, the service and the 
nod more than made up for it. 

The hall was decorated with maroon 
and white streamers and colored lights. 
I'alms were placed on the stage and in 
the cha[>crones' corner. 

Mrs. Ellis was the chaperone from Mt. 
Holyoke, while Mr. and Mrs. George 
Cotton represented the college. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Thursday— 
3-4o p. m. Assembly. Phi Kappa 
I'hi address by President William 
A. Neilson of Smith College. 

Friday— 

Varrity cross-country. M.A.C. vs. 
Amherst at M.A.C. 

' "otball. Two Years vs. Vermont 
Academy at Saxtons River, Vt. 

Man meeting. 

Co-ed Hallowe'en party. 
•Saturday 

' J,| |).m. Varsity football. M.A.C. 
vs. Amherst at Pratt Field. 

Fraternity house dances at Q.T.V., 
Kappa Sigma, Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Theta Chi, Lambda Chi Alpha. 
Sunday- 
ni. Sunday Chapel. Speaker, 
bishop Francis J. McConnell of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
•'I'tsburg, Pa. 
Monday— 

!'• ni. Football. Freshman-Sopho- 
more numeral game. 



MASS MEETING 



Thursday Night 

Stockbridge Hall 

7 o'clock 

Parade will leave Q.T.V. House 

at Q.4S 

Everybody out ! 



COLLEGE IS LOANED 
NOTABLE ART EXHIBIT 

Exhibition of Original Oil Paintings 
in "M" Building of Unusual Interest. 



The unusual collection of original oil 
paintings now on exhibition in the Mem 

orial Building was secured for the college 
by Prof. F. A. Waugh, and is one of a 

series of collections especially assembled 

for colleges by The American Federation 
of Arts. All the pictures in this unit 
have been loaned by the Grand Central 
Art Galleries, with the exception of two 
pictures loaned by the McBeth Galleries, 
and two from the collection of The 
Metropolitan Museum. The collection 
consists of notable examples of the work 
of celebrated contemporary artists, and 
is particularly happy in the quality of 
the work included. 

The portrait of the Indian by Walter 
Ufer, who is renowned especially for his 
south-western landscapes with their effec- 
tive union of earth and sky, is one of the 
features of the exhibit. The brilliant 
still life study by Anna Fisher is also 
unusually interesting in its effective 
balancing of masses. 

Other noteworthy pictures are Charles 
Woodbury's marine landsca|>e, with its 
luscious blues; W. Elmer Schofield's 
kinetic seascape; and "The Road Over t he- 
ll ills" by Ben Poster, an artist who is 
one of the thirty-five Americans to Im.- 
accorded a place in the Luxembourg 
collection. 



New Member 

Of Faculty 

John J. Helyar, Vermont County 
Agent, Succeeds Prof. Abbott. 



Mr. John J. Helyar of Brattleboro, Vt., 
has been appointed Extension Professor 
of Agronomy at M.A.C. to sin iced Prof. 
John B. Abbott. Mr. Helyar graduated 
from the I'niversity of Vermont in 1908 
from which institution he has also the 
degree of Master of Science. He served 

a> instructor in Agronomy"!! the I'niver- 
sity of Vermont from 19<)9 to 19 12. From 
1012 to 1920 he was associated with 
Rutgers College and the New Jersey Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. He lias had 
a wide experience as farm manager and 
since 1923 has been employed as county 
agent in Windham County, Vt., Mr. 
Helyar expects to commence his duties 
here about the middle of November. 



SHAW CERTIFIES MANY 
TREES FOR GROWERS 



Identification of varieties an impor- 
tant service to farmers. 



The Massachusetts Fruit Growers' 
Association, through representative of 
the department of Pomology of the 
College and Experiment Station, has 
recently finished its season's work in 
nursery certification. This includes the 
examination of one and two year old 
trees while still in the nursery row, the 
affixing of a lead seal to those found true 
to name, and the rejecting of trees found 
untrue. The distinguishing character- 
istics of the trees which makes this work 
possible are found in the leaf growth. 

The investigational work which has 
made nursery inspection possible was 
instituted some thirteen years ago under 
the leadership of Dr. J. K. Shaw of the 
Experiment Station. The impelling mo- 
tive was the realization of the great loss 
suffered by fruit growers through omitt- 
ing misnamed varieties. In pushing the 
study, Dr. Shaw secured leases of apple 
trees from all sections of the country, 
from old trees and from young trees, 
from trees grown under good soil condi- 
tions as well as from those grown under 
poor conditions. It gradually became 
apparent that nearly every variety had 
certain distinguishing marks which one 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Four Foolish Frosh 

Frolic on Field 



Regan, (Heaves, Gasper and Grover 
Delight Spectators with Compulsory 
Entertainment. 

The spectators present at the M.i". 

Annie Worcester lech game last Satur- 
day . not only saw a S/cird name ol football 
but were privileged to witness anothei 

spectacle which was even more weird and 

certainly much more amusing when four 
erring freshmen paid the penalty for theii 
misdeeds l>\ furnishing an Eavoluntar) 
entertainment. The unwilling recipients 

ol this honor were John M. Regan ol 
Amherst, Charles S. < leaves of Gardner, 

Frank Gasper of Dighton, and Richard 
\V. Grover ol Cambridge. These four 
wen- accorded the Battering distinction 

of being the lour "wisest" freshmen in 
the class. 

At the close of the first half of the game, 
the four miscreants, substantially clad 
against the rigor of the chill south wind 
in track pants and sleeveless jerseys of 
brilliant hue, each provided against the 
pangs of hunger with a large 1m it tK- of 
milk and armed with umbrella or broom- 
stick, were urged upon the field by the 
heartless ixjphomores. Forming a set of 
fours, under the command of "Spiffy" 
Wilcox, they marched up the field with 
umbrellas at right shoulder arms and 
came to a halt facing the bleachers. Then 
for a short time the air was full of broom- 
sticks and umbrellas as the four executed 
— and executed is the word — the manual 
of arms. When the atmosphere was again 
clear, each freshman was put through a 
brief interrogation to an accompaniment 
of jeering quest ionsand derisive comment s. 
Next on the program came a truly remark- 
able representation of a troop of cadets 
rece i ving their first lesson in riding. 
After In-ing informed of the proper method 
of mounting a horse, the four (adits 
timidly approached their fiery kiddy-cars 
and (limbed astride. The would Ik- 
Cnvakymen, however, proved unable to 
control the excited animals, and a mad 
race down the field ensued. Following 
this, in response to shouts of "Bring 'em 
over", the hapless freshmen perambulated 
across the gridiron, and "did their stuff" 
in front of the Worcester bleachers much 

to the edification of the spectators, 

As a climax to the entertainment, the 
lean, lank, elongated, and loquacious 
Grover, feebly flapping his fins in imi- 
tation of the well-known farmyard fowl, 
fluttered to the center of the field and 
there, on a nest of hay specially provided, 
while the audience applauded, laid an egg; 

At last the freshmen were ordered t () 
march from the field, but as they neare,| 
(Continued on Pafte 2) 



Agates Fail to Hold Tech 

to Last Year's Scor 

Mftfooa and White is Scored on for First Time 
this Season, but Beats Worcester, 54-19 



Cross Country Team 

Swamps Worcester 

Kntire M.A.C. Team Crosses Line in 
Dead Heat, Far Ahead of Nearest 
Tech Runner. 



The Aggie etnas counti j team avenged 
itseti with vigor on the \\ IM. barriers 

for the stinging defeat which \\Vsle\aii 

had administered the previous Wednesday 

and romped home to a 16 to 50 triumph 

over Worcester Tech, over the M.A.C 

i course last Saturday. 

The end of the race, which Came be- 
tween the halves of the W.P.I, football 
game, was unique to the last degree, for 
the seven Aggie men entered, crossed the 
finish line seven abreast, far ahead of the 
first W.P.I. man, to defeat the visitors 
by the widest margin possible. The time 
of 28 minutes, 28 seconds was only fair, 
due to the fact that the home team was 
not closely pressed during the latter |>art 
of the race. 

The next meat comes with Amherst on 
Friday afternoon over the M.A.C. course, 
over which the Amherst runners have 
been assiduously practicing for the past 
week. 

The men finished in the following order 
in the W.I'.I. meet: Bartlett, Wheeler, 
Biron, Nottabeart, Swan, Preston, and 
Forest of M.A.C., were tied for first 
place. Then came Meigs, Adams, Newton, 
Merrill, I'arnienter, and Pearson of the 
W.I'.I. team in the order mentioned. 



TEAM 


PERI 


:k? 


STAGES 
L T Pta, 






G 


w 


P.C. 


Mass. Aggie 


4 


4 








106 


1.000 


Springfield 


4 


1 





1 


90 


1.000 


Amherst 


s 


4 


1 





lea 


800 


Conn. Aggie- 


s 


2 


li 





10 


.400 


Norwich 


6 


2 


3 





27 


.400 


Tufts 


.'} 


1 


2 





7 


. 388 


Bates 


4 


1 


:i 


1) 


2r> 


300 


Won ester 


4 


1 


:i 





31 


2"»0 


Lowell Textile 


5 


1 


4 





12 


.200 



JUNIOR CLASS 

HAS FIRST SMOKER 



Prof. McKimmie Speaks at 1927 
Gathering in Social Union Room. 



The Junior class helrJ its first smoker of 
the year in the Social Union room last 
Wednesday evening, at which a large 
number of the class were present. Corn 
cob pipes, tobacco and cigarettes were 
passed around to all those present. 
Music furnished by Moon Mullin's 
Melodious Music Masters enlivened the 
social and refreshments of sandwiches, 
cider, and apples put everyone in the 
highest of spirits. A novel feature of the 
evening was a fast and furious boxing 
bout between "Angy" Merlini and "Coldy" 
Goldberg in which the decision was 
awarded to Merlini. Prof. McKimmie 
presented a very interesting talk on 
"( allege Friendships" which was followed 
by short talks from several members of 
the class. Due largely to the capable 
management of the chairman "Demie" 
C.alanie, the smoker was considered by 
all a great success. 



at Wesleyan 

Nottebaert and Crooks Hindered by 
Sprained Ankles in Middletown Meet. 



The Aggie harriers eUCCUmbed to t lu- 
st long Wesleyan cross-country team by 
a score of 4.'M5 at Middletown, Conn., 
last Wednesday for their first defeat of 
the season. The M.A.C. runners did their 
I test over the Wesleyan course, which is 
only Hi miles in length, but were Opposed 
by a team of high caliber which would 
not be denied. 

Nottebaert and (rooks both suffered 
sprained ankles, the latter's SQTJOUS 
enough to keep him from running against 
W.P.I, on Saturday. The order in which 
the runners finished was as follows: 

Newton <W), J ohn s on (W), Parkinsua 

(W), Halt (W), Beebe (W), Preston 
(MAC. i Crooks 'M.A.C), French (W), 
Biron (M.A.C), Winder (M.A.C. », 
Nottebaert (M.A.C), Severance (W), 
Swan (M.A.C). Bartlett (M A < 



TWO YEAR TEAM 

CONQUERS FROSH 

Shorthorns Tally Twice In Final 
Period for Victory over Neophytes. 



COOCB "Red" Ball's Two Year team 
again demonstrated its ability to win a 
game in the final quarter by scoring two 
touchdowns against "Ed" Tumey's lighter 
freshman eleven in the final period to 
win by a score of 10 to 7 in the annual 
game played on Alumni Field last Satur- 
day morning. 

The Two Years tallied first on a safety 
by McKittrick, but the freshmen came 
back strong in the second session and 
scored on a short pass from Kudquist to 
Bowie after they had gained possession 
of the ball by blocking a punt. Both the 
Two Year's touchdowns came as a result 
of taking advantage of their opponent! 
imsptays, the first coming after Kelley 
had recovered a fumble in freshman 
territory, and the second, after Burgevin 

had blocked a punt. 

For the Two Years, Kelley gained COO- 
-.istently through the line, and Yiale, 
Ryan, and Burgevin did good work 
among the forwards. Rudquist, Mills. 
Cox and Sullivan deserve Spedal mention 
on the yearling side. Summary: 

Two Year Freshmen 

Vialc, le re. foster 

Ryan, It rt . Johnaoa 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Although scored on lot the first time 

this season, the Mass. Aggk football 

team piled up ■ i < > 1 1 i i ■ • 1. 1 1 > I . aeon agahisl 
the Worceetei rech gridaters at Alumni 

Field last Saturday when they turned the 

engineers back ">f to 10 in a game marked 
by Kood offensive pfaj but rather lagged 
defense. 

Worceetei brought the first llashy back- 
field m. n arbo h.ne played on Alumni 
field thi>, year, in Converse and Guidi. 
I >i. k Convene first showed himself in 

the second period when he got a punt 
from Sullivan on his ten yard line and 
sprinted nin.tv yards down the sideline 

for the first W o rces ter count, In the 

same (|u.iiler, the Agates were introduced 
to the other Worcester Hash, Joe ( .nidi, 
who scored hum his own twenty-five y.nd 
line, slipping through off tackle and then 
eluding 'the M.A.C. secondary by clever 
dodging and almost superhuman spend, 
The Converse to C.uidi DSaSSng coinbin.i 
tion proved to Im- a team that brought 
gasps to the Aggie bleachers. However, 
it never proved fatal until the final period 
when the visitors stored again using two 
long Baeaea and the breaks to cross the 
last stripe. 

The scoring started early. After an 
exchange of kicks and a |>enalty Aggie had 
the ball on the visitors' forty-yard line. 
A long end run by Moberg brought the 
ball inside the ten-yard zone. In this 
position Worcester recovered an Aggie 
fumble only to lose it on lt bad pass from 
(enter when "Larry" Jones fell on the 
ball bshehd the zero mark for the tn^t 
tally. Ililyard kicked for the extra point 

Moth Molx-rg and Sullivan made them- 
selves conspicuous throughout the game, 
not only by their long gains but by the 
Consistency with which they covered 
ground in several consecutive plays. 
Both men carried the ball five or six tine -, 
in succession on occasion. One notable 
fact was the the style of play was (hanged 
somewhat liom the Aggie line plugging to 
a battering of the ends of the line. I lie 
forwards certainly did their job in this 
type of play. Never was such cutting 
down seen as w.i, very evident last Satur- 
day. 

The Agates snored ia every period 
using practically a combination of the 

Second and third teams in the second 

half. Mnhoney with SuUivaa made the 

fifth touchdown, arnica came early in I he- 
third quarter, peeeibie. Mahooey I c 

sophomore who has not obtained a regular 
berth yet. Haertl and S|>clinan l*>th 
Contributed tO tfftt Aggie yardage. Haertl 

has played a period ia each of the preced- 
ing games and has s, .„.-,| ., touchdown, 
but Spdmaa has never reported in a 
varsity game before. I le made a promising 
debut. 



The summary: 








M.A.C. 






Worcester 


( "ook, le 






re, Hubbard 


T. < ievtn, It 






rg, Cariooo 


Tulenko, lg 






rg, Delano 


( 'ouhig, i 






c, Lewis 


Thurlow, rg 






lg, Diinmick 


Anistein. rt 






It, Angeles 


Jones, re 






le, DaJd 


( lustafaon, qb 






qb, Moran 


Moberg, Ihb 






rhb, Cahfeef 


Sullivan, rhb 




Ihb, (Jon verse 


Ililyard, fb 






fb, Cuirli 


Sore by periods 


1 


2 


a 4 Tti. 


M.A.C 


20 


7 


IS 13— M 


Worcest er 





14 


0—19 



Touchdowns — Jones, Sullivan .'}, Mo- 
berg i, Converse, Guidi 2. Points from 
try after touchdowns — Jones 5, Ililyard, 
Converse. Referee Swaffield, Brown. 
Umpire -Peterson, Colgate. Head lines- 
man I.arkin, Holy Cross. Time — 15- 
minute periods. Substitutions: M.A.C — ■ 
Trull for Thurlow, Malley for Cook, 
CM i inn for Gnstafson, Plantina for Cavin, 
( a|>one for Spellman, Tuttlc for Malley, 
Richardson for Tulenko, Mulhern for 
'Continued on Page 2) 



OPPONENTS' SCORKS 

Maine 16, Bates 7 

Norwich 12, Lowell Textile © 

Conn. Aggies 3, Tufts 

Amherst 7.1, Wesleyan ti 

Springfield 10, N. II. State I" 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY. OCT. 28, 1925 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 



Mary T. Boyd '26 
John F. Lambkkt '28 



Ediior-inrChief 
Managing Editor 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 



Editorial 
Cider PreM 
Athletics 

Campui Newt 



Co-Ed Newt 
Faculty Newt 



Maky T. Boyd "26 

Maey T. Boyd "26 

William L. Dole '27 

Harold L. Clark '28 

Raymond F. Difley '27 

Ellsworth Barnard '28 

Josephine Panzica '28 

Frances C. Bruce '27 

Ernest L. Spencer '28 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Alvin G. Stevens '26 Butinett Manager 

Edwin A. Wildee'28 Advertising Manager 

Lewis H. Whitakeb '27 Circulation Manager 

' John E. White "27 

Douglas W. Losing '28 

Charles F. Clagg '27 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub 
scribers will please notify the busines 
manager as soon as possible. 



"Because of the organization of this 
University 1 can net in touch with any of 
the student! or MtdMfl here in ten 
minutet 1 notice. 

"For an individual CMlfatg into the 
I nivi rsity and saying, 'I want to do what 
I want to do', means starting endl< -s 
trouble for himself and everyone else. 

"The best thing to do is to fall into the 
line of University organization as soon as 
you can. If you don't learn the value of 
organization in four years ot eo H e gf life, 
you will have lost one of the most valuable 
things acquired by college men and 
women. 

"Two years ago every freshman who 
attended these freshmen lectures was in 
the Chapel and prepared to hear me talk 
in four minutes. This was possible be- 
cause of the organization directed by our 
military officers. 

"Students in the University organize in 
their classes into cheering sections, into 
fraternities and clubs, and other ways. 
Organization is necessary in the annual 
cane rush, which is participated in by the 
irishmen and the sophomores. Usually 
the sophomores beat the freshmen because 
of better organization." 




Pond Parties — Minus the Pond 

Student — How d'ju like the landless 
pond party? 

Another — Aw, it's all wet! 



entered as second-clasa matter at the Amherst 
Port Office. Accepted for mailing at social rate 
of iiortage provided for in section 110B. Act ot < PC- 
tober, 1917 authorized August 20, 1918. 



The Choir 

For several past chapel e\en i>es, the 
collide choir has appeared on StOCkbridgC 
platform. The choir is composed of (dee 
Club men, and, in theory at least, leada 
our singing and inspires us to fresh and 
hitherto undreamed of efforts. 

Unfortunately, under the present cir- 
cumstances, that is precisely what the 
choir does not do. At best, it givci to 
the student body a fresh focal point of 
interest for attentions bag since wearied 
by contemplating the festoons of COM 1 
heads about the auditorium. As tag as 
the ihoir ring! with the college, their 
expert offering will continue to Ik- lost in 
the ucncial volume, anil instead of an 
inspiration the audit nee will have only the 
somewhat unpleasant spectacle of a group 
of yountf men rhythmically opening their 
mouths and closing them ftfftin. 

The basic idea it sound: the leadership 
of I choir of trained voice will certainly 
improve our somewhat erratic rendering 
of the hymns. We are ready and willing 

to be improved, but, this improvement 
will never be effected by ■ tendi ng the 

choir before us and having them sin^ 
with us. at least, not until we have 
profited b> their example to some degree. 
We have heard from the student ImhIv 
two MggestfCNM which seem to be entirely 
feasible. The first is that the choir shall 
s'iiik the first sian/a alone, as a demon- 
stration ol how the Hngiag •houtd be done. 
and then that the college join in Ml the 
ntCOnd st.m/a, and so continue through 

the hymn. The second euggeetion i- thai 

the choir be permitted to sine, the opening 

hymn alone, and that the service close 

with a repetition <»i the hymn raagab) 
the entire group. As a possible variation, 
it is further suggested that the college 

sine, the Opening hymn in chorus and then 
the choir conclude the service bv a ren 
ditioti of the hymn which will open the 

following chapel exercise. 

Sevt ,.,! - ears ago M..\.< . announced 
that it wished to be known as "a singing 

college". Hymns are certainly a part ol 

our college singing,— and our hymn siiiK- 
inK will be in the future what the choir 

makes it. Of course, we all stand read) 

to help. 



Rain 

"In my day," said the Old Orad, 
"rainy day was a rainy day." 

"It still is," said the Reporter, hanging 
his dripping yellow sliker over a chair. 

"It's still wet," the Old <",rad panted, 
"Hut that's all. It used to be, when it 
rained, that we all got out our oldest 
clothes, — some fellows had raincoats, but 
they were [Main heavy rubber affairs — 
raincoat!, they were, not rainbows." 

"I like this new style," he continued. 
"These yellow affairs make the day con- 
siderably less gloomy. The ones with the 
mOttOI and names ami pictures on them 
are as good as the big umbrellas men 
used to have on their wagons — they were 
all painted up too. Hut what makes the 
biggest difference is that no one latries 
umbrellas any more. Umbrellas are the 
dodos of the student world nowadays." 

"It's too bad," concluded the Old < .rad 
pensively, "It takes away all chance to 
quote our favorite campus poem of forty 
years ago. I'll tell it to you, though," 
and he declaimed softly: 

"The rain falls on the just, 
And also on the unjust fellers, 
Hut more upon the just, 
because the unjust have the just's 
umbrellas!" 



As long as public sentiment is against 
pond parties — but they have their uses, 
fellow citizens! — these dry splashes are 
fairly good substitutes. At least the 
spectators have all the fun of a traditional 
party except the joyful spectacle of 
watching the immersed Frosh struggle to 
shore with a mouthful of the local algae — 
but even that pleasure was always 
tempered by fear that the falling Frosh 
would land on the water with more impact 
than techni<|ue. And water, as some of us 
have found out after diving — is no feather 
bed. 



THE CAMPUS WHO'S WHO 



A. Hrof. Waugh has a musical recita- 
tion every year in his Landscape 75 to 
illustrate certain points in his lectures. 
Several of them, in fact, but this particu- 
lar one concerns itself with V'ictrola 
music. The first selection played was a 
violin recording by Fritz Kreisler. At 
the conclusion : 

Prof. Waugh (to class) — How did you 
like that? 

Class (politely) — Very nice. Good, 
(from the back rows) Lovely. 

Next came a Paul Whiteman record — a 
new one. At the conclusion: 

Prof. Waugh — And how about that? 

The class (with much enthusiasm) — 
Fine! Play the other side! 



In this case, outside of a certain loss of 
dignity, the performers were looked on as 
little more than involuntary entertainers, 
and the fact that they were minor crimi- 
nals was lost sight of in their performances. 



AT THE ABBEY 



COLLEGE AGAIN ASKS 

FOR GYMNASIUM 



Freshman Dormitory and Horticul- 
tural Manufactures Building are 
Other Chief Requests. 

Approp ria tions for the first unit of ■ 
gymnasium and fa a freshman dorniiioi \ , 
for each of which $1'>0,0<)0 has been asked, 
are the chief items in the sin-cial appro 

priattons which the college baa requested 

for 1996. 160,000 has been asked for a 
Horticultural Manufactures Laboratory, 

and 121,000 for a practice house for Home 

Economics. Other appropriations needed 

are: Women's Gymnasium Equipment, 
116,480; Roads and Walks, 111,000; 
Grading Ana South of Athletic Field. 
i hi; New Steam Line, East Experi- 
ment Station to Microbiology Building, 
14,775; Repairs to Physics Building, 
14,000; Living Quarters for Foreman at 
nilson Farm, 16,000; and Additional 
Land for Cranberry Station at Fast 
Wan ham. g 1,000. These make a total of 

1434,725 needed for special appropri- 
ations for the corning year. 



Echoes Of "Omaha" 
Last week the CotXSGtAM published a 

very small part of President Cooltdge's 
"Omaha" speech. The greater part was. 

of necessity, omitted. In that omitted 

part was a statement <>f direct import to 
the students of a R.O.T.C. college such 

as ours, to the effect that military training 
makes good citizens because it tenches 

them the value ot obedience. 

That this idea of obedience is of fun- 
damental importance to us all. especially 
in our present stage of incipient citi/.en 
ship, has been brought out further by 
President Thompson of Ohio State I'ni- 
versitv. We are therefore quoting from 
a recent talk given by President Thomp- 
son to the incoming freshman class, as 

reported in Tkt New simU-iti. 

"The best thing to do is do what you 
are told. 

"Take the advice and direction of those 
who know more about things than you 
do. Those in charge of affairs at the 
University may make mistakes, but they 
can usually do their jobs better than those 
who know nothing about them. 



AGGIES FAIL TO HOLD 

Continued from pwte I) 

Couhig. Nichols for Hityard, Marx for 
Gavin, Spellman for Moberg, HaertI for 
Spellman, Fessenden for Anwtem, Ma 
honey for HaertI, Baker for Thuriow, 
Black for Tulenko, McAUester for Mul- 

hern, Smith for Cook. Worcester — 
Lester for Carlson. Freeman for Hubbard, 
Wendin for Freeman. Wilkinson for 
('alder. Shaker for Angeles. 



A purposeful defiance of campus regu- 
lations and traditions should certainly be 
disciplined. Hut we wonder if these field 
parties are really effective disciplinary 
measures? How aliout putting offenders 
to work? The athletic fields always need 
extra valeting, and the prospect of toil 
might deter offenders who merely glory 
in publicity, even though it be such 
publicity as the boys received a few days 

ago. 

A good many "fresh" freshmen have 
taken George Cohan's motto for their 
own, — and ( ieorge said, if you will re- 
member, "I don't care what you say about 
me — just mention my name!" 

CT 

Banana Oil 

"I'm stopping at the Ritzmore," 
Wrote high-hat Bill McFard, 

He didn't add he only stopped 
To write that postal card. 

CP 

Lizzie and her Synonyms 

In its latest issue. The Tappet pu b lis he s 
a list of the siims seen on the backs of 
Fords, which the Cider Press takes great 
pleasure in reprinting for the edification 
and Inspiration of our local charioteers. 

'Nash' Can 

The Ingersoll of Autos 

Oil by Myself 

Sick Cylinders 

Puddle Jumper 

The Stuttering Stutz 

Four wheels, all tired 

1 may be shift U ss but I'm not lazy 

fierce Arrow, with a quiver 

lOOjl A Meri Can 

Just see what $12.00 will do 

'.l'.)',' Static 

Chicken, Here's your Coupe 

Rolls-Oats 

Danger! 20,000 Jolts 

Vertical Four 

Struggle Buggy 

Baby Lincoln 

The Uncovered Wagon 

Little Ho Creep 

Honest Weight— No Springs 

Pis Squeals 

Mah-Junk 

Pray as you Filter 

Kofls-Kuff 
And not forgetting that refined gem of 
humor — 

If you can read this 

You're too close. 

CP 



October 23, 1926. 
To the Editor 

of the Collegian 
Dear Sir: 

During the past three years a number of 
articles have been stolen from the M.A.C. 
Christian Association office in North 
College. The nature of the goods has 
been such that only one conclusion seems 
possible: they were removed by under- 
graduates. 

At one time a special fondness was 
evinced for electric light bulbs, window 
shades, waste-paper baskets, and mirrors. 
At other times certain persons used the 
Association's phone to call up their 
"loved ones" in distant towns. The close 
of last year found the Association with an 
unaccounted for toll bill of some SI 2.00. 
The culminating insult, however, occurred 
a few days ago when a certain individual 
tore down and removed from the walls of 
the office the only remaining ornament in 
that otherwise barren and smelly room — 
a large M.A.C. banner. 

The writer is well aware that such 
individuals form only a fractional part of 
our student body. Yet small as the 
number is, this group is a disgrace to the 
institution. As a remedy for the future, 
the writer ventures to suggest that the 
time is ripe for inaugurating a new en- 
trance test by means of which the college 
will be better able to ascertain the indi- 
vidual's moral fitness for the privileges 
and responsibilities of a college course. 
Each year we gather in a few individuals 
— and allow some to remain — who belong 
either in a reformatory, or in a psycho- 
pathic ward. The deficiencies of said 
persons are never so apparent as when 
they are trying to be furtny. 

It will be a day of real progress, and 
some rejoicing, when psychology (lis 
covers the methods for detecting the 
individuals who, though mentalK c a p abl e , 
are morally deficient. 

In behalf of the Association. 
John B. Hanna. 



Shades of the O. P. Club! Next That* 
day is scheduled as "Tap Day" for tat 
F. P. Club, a new honorary society in 
the Abbey. 

M 

Miss Skinner was the speaker at | 
meeting of Delta Phi Gamma, held last 
Monday evening. 

M 

The following have been elected to 
committees which will have charge of the 
building of a cabin for the girls on Mi. 
Toby, next spring: Finance, Ruth Putnam 
'26, Ella Buckler '27, Dorothy Leonard '28 
Esther Perkins '29, and Janet Weeks, two 
year '28; Floor plan, Margaret Smith '2ii 
Hilda Goller '27, Harriet Proctor "Jg 
Lois Bliss '29, and Bessie Ames, two year 
'26. 



Taft Speaks on 

1 8th Amendment 

"The second greatest issue facing the 
people of the United States today is what 
shall be done with regard to the l.sth 
Amendment." This was the statement 
made by Horace D. Taft of the Taft 
School of Watertown, Conn., speaking at 
Assembly last Thursday. Continuing bit 
address, Mr. Taft said that those who 
oppose prohibition can offer, in the face 
of present conditions, which both "win 
and "drys" admit is deplorable, but three 
alternatives, namely, to repeal the Amend 
ment, to legalize the sale of beer and light 
wines, or to make the law a dead letter, 
The speaker said that the opponents of 
prohibition talk loudly about these thin^-, 
but when they are asked whether they 
think that any of these proposals can 
possibly be carried out, their only answer 
is profanity. 

After showing clearly why the pursuance 
of any of these courses would be impossible 
Mr. Taft stated that the only way out el 
the present situation is obedience to the 
law, for the law must be obeyed before n 
can be enforced. The speaker said in 
conclusion: "I don't ask you to agree 
with me. All that I ask is that you take 
a fair view of what I have said and then 
do your duty as you see it." 



MACHMER SPEAKES TO 

PRO MERITO SOCIETY 



High School Honorary Society Holds 
Annual Meeting in Amherst and 
Visits Campus. 



An O-pun Question 

Did you hear Dean Machmer's chapel 
pun — the one about the man who, if he 
were intolerant of sects, was generally an 
insect? 



SHAW CERTIFIES MANY TREES 
(Continued from Page 1) 

defined could lie easily and tpjickly recog 
nized. These marks have always been 
there— the difficulty was that they had 
never before been seen. After this first 
step, which itself was the product of seven 
years' work, the rest was easy. 

It was in 1921 that the Massachusetts 
Fruit Growers' Association first spon- 
sored the work of nursery certification. 
In this first year certification was confined 
to a single nursery in which 2880 trees 
were examined, of which over 111 pen cut 

were reje ct e d . By 1924 the work had 

been extended to include six nurseries 

with a total of i2o,ti<>9 trees examined, 

with only -i percent rejected. The sea- 
son's work just completed included certi- 
fication of thirteen nurseries in four states 
and the examination of 280,000 trees. 
Some of the men employed went as far 
as Western Pennsvlvania. 



CAVALRY TENT WRECKED 
The newly erected teal in which the 
cavalry horses have been kept during the 

recent cold spell, was blown down by the 
high wind of last Sunday night. None of 
the horses were seriously injured, but the 
tent was entirely demolished, entailing a 
loss of about $200. 

A fund of 116,800 has been sec tired by 
the college for the rebuilding of a new 
cavalry barn, upon which work is to begin 
immediately. The barn will lie built of 
concrete blocks which will eliminate the 
possibility of destruction by another fire, 
and will consist of two. or possibly three 
units. One 1'nit will be used for stabling 
the horses only and another for forage. 



Kxtraor dcanary 



Dean Machmer s|>oke on "Five Prin- 
ciples Which Make for Real Worth" at 
the banquet which was held in conned ion 
with the annual meeting of the Westers 
Mass. division of the Pro Merito Socktf 
in Amherst last Saturday. The met) 
met as the guests of Principal Brows « 
the Amherst High School and of the local 
chapter of the Pro Merito Society. The 
morning was devoted to the inspection ot 
the campuses of M.A.C. and Amber* 
College. A meeting was held in the 
Amherst High School for the election of 
the new officers of the society. 

At 12.30 a banquet was served bj Mrs. 

Davenport at the First Congregat: 
Church, at which Dean Machmer pre- 
sented his talk. Mr. C.adsby, principal 
emeritus of North Adams High Schod 
and founder of the Pro Merito Society 
also made a few remarks, explaining W 
origin and purpose of the society. Abe* 
!.")() members were present at this meeting 
The Pro Merito Society is an organ! 
/at ion which gives recognition for Bchou* 
tic attainment to high school student- 6 

corresponds to the Phi Beta Kappa and 
the Phi Kappa Phi Societies in the « 



TWO YEAR TEAM 

(Continued from Page I) 



-CP- 



When a heart-breaker appeared on the 
scene, it used to be "Watch out, young 
man!", but now they'll have to be saying, 
"Young man, watch in!" 

The implication in the above gift, we 
presume, being, "it's time to marry". 

CP 

"She" Sings 

The girls they all have shingles, 
Their heads look very pert: 

Their ears are in the open 

Where they can get all the dirt. 

CP 

And that's that! 



Calf rev, Ig 
l.ovejoy, c 

Burgevin, rg 

Shehuit, rt 
Hurrill, re 
Truelson, qb 
Masse, Ihb . 
Tribe, rhb 
Kelley, fb 

Score by periods 
Two Year 
Freshmen 



rg, Rich 
c, Nitkcu ic/ 
lg, Kreienbaum 
It. Cox 
le. Howie 
qb, Mills 
rhb, McKittrick 
Ihb. Kay 
fb, Rudquist 
12 3 4 Ttl. 
2 14—16 
7 0—7 



EXPERIMENT STATION NOTES 

Mr. Henri D. Haskins '00. chemist « 
charge of the fertilizer control of the 
Kxperiment Station is in WashingtoS 
where he is attending the annual meetiag 
of the Association of Agricultural Collet 
and Fxperiment Stations. Mr. Hasfafl* 
has served for the last year as vio p < '■ 
dent of the organization. 



Touchdowns — Kelley 2, Howie. Points 
from try after touchdowns — Tribe 2, 
Rudquist. Safety — McKittrick. Referee 
— Hicks. Umpire — Cotton. Head lines- 
man — Clark. Time — 10 and 12-minute 
periods. Substitutions — Elliot for Foster, 
Crowley for Rich, Sullivan for Kreien- 
baum, Kelley for Kay. 



FOUR FOOLISH FROSH 

(Continued from Page 11 

the goal posts, they saw awaiting the* a 
grim group of sophomores, each holding 
a pail of icy water. This was too much 
for the luckless frosh; they broke and 
ran, but before they were able to I 
each shrinking and shivering figure re ' 
ceived a liberal dousing of cold water 
A sadder — and it is to be hoped, a bf 
"wise"— quartet of freshmen, they made 
a melancholy exit. 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 28, 1925 



THE HOUSE OF WALSH— 

Service Quality Satisfaction 



K I haven't what you want I can gel It 
ROBERT C. AMES 

Uhl'hNIlABLE 

Clock. Watch and Jewelry Repairing 
Diamond Setting. Jewelrv, Clocks, Silverware, 

Watche*. Diamond* 
4b pieaiant St., corner of Ilallock 

Opp. Amherit Laundry 
Tel Ml-R •' Mlaa Ida Russell'* 

-ii mi i/iit "D dotted lin**nd k»ep for future r*fat*nc> 



The Best In Drug Store Merchandise 

The Heat in Drug Store Service 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

Th» SanclL Star* 



Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 



We carry the best in everything 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



AMHERST 



MASS. 



BIG BOOK SALE 
Our Big Three Day Book Sale Starts on 

FRIDAY, Oct. 30th. Friday, Saturday, Monday 

Among the books sold will be the remainder of stock of the Geoffery 
Amherst Bookshop recently purchased. Books at \ and J discount. 
Children's Books included. 



— JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

"Kodaks keep the story." Now is the time to get those pictures 

We have everything necessary to do the job. 
Kodaks, Films, Printing Paper. Developing, Printing, Enlarging 

DEUEL'S 



BOSTONIMNS 



Exclusively a 



College Shoe 



B0LLES ShOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



The Slickest Coat on the Campus ! 

No well dressed college man is 
without one. It's the original, 
correct slicker and there's noth- 
ing as smart or sensible for 
rough weather and chilly days. 

Made of famous yellow water* 
proof oiled fabric. Has all- 
round strap on collar and elas- 
tic at wrist-bands. 

Clasp-closing style 

Button-closing style 

Stamp the correct name in your 
memory, and buy no other. 
The "Standard Student" is 
made only by the Standard 
OUed Clothing Co., N. Y. C 

Slip one on 

ALL GOOD DEALERS 





Give me a pipe 
• . • and 

P. A.! 




WHEN Comp. Lit. and Physics 3-B arc crowd- 
ing for attention; when I've just received an 
over-cut notice from the Dean; when my allow- 
ance is a month off and the stub of my check- 
book confesses a balance of #9.32, give me a 
pipe and Prince Albert. I want to be happy! 

Trouble's a bubble, they say. And I can 
prove it . . . with my jimmy-pipe and P. A. 
Just never was a friend like Prince Albert. Cool 
and sweet and soothing, P. A.'s true-blue smoke '■ * I ■»" everywhere u, 

tidy red lint, found and half- 

zooms up the stem, knocking troubles for a row M™' -? ■*?**•' •*" 

- a with tpongr moitlencr top. 

of test-tubes. 

Never a tongue-bite or throat-parch. Just 
cool contentment, no matter how hard you hit 
it up. Give me a grate fire to chase the chill of 
winter nights, an easy chair and my jimmy-pipe 
packed with P. A. Nearby, a tidy red tin for 
frequent refills. I know, Brother, I know! 

>RINGE ALBERT 

— no other tobacco is like it! &£-*& & rVoTS 

ounctt in every tin. 



And always with every bit <>/ 

bile and parch removed by the 

Prince Albert prottli. 




O 1925. B J. R-ynnM" Toh«wo 
Company. Wlncton-S-Jem, N. C 



TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

Sec JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 8.j25 



COLLEGE SHOES 

— AT — 

TOWN PRICES 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



WE ARE READY FOR THE 

HUNTI NG SEASON! 

Also, all kinds of Rubber Footwear 

always carried in stock. 

HOSIERY a Specialty 

JOHN FOTOS 

SKLF-SKRVICK SIIOK STORK 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUNSINGWEAR and MEDALIA 

SILK HOSE 

NG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST S1IADKS AT 

$1.00 $1.39 $1.75 

G. Edward Fisher 



You Mill find an eicelhint 

. . . SIIOK KKi'AIKIM; SIIOI' ... 
equipped with the moat up-to-date t.oodyear 
Machinery and a modern 
SIIOK SHI NINO i'AKI.OK 
at IIJ Amity-Si., - I ubrovit/ lilock 

II 'c under Uiml ynur mjuirrmtnt^ anil art pre- 
pared In meet your needs. 
AH ;v>rk guaranteed. Shnes hived and dyed. 

VINCENT GRANOONIOO. Prop. 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

Just received a fresh supply of 
Squash Rackets and Halls. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

KKAK AMIIKKST HANK 



Hallowe'en 

Favors and 
Place Cards 

MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



Everything 

the new 
student needs 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

IN THE M BUILDING 



Pens 
Paper Supplies 

Stationery 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mass 

Our laundry Mm f .las* 

Our Policy Ouaranteed 

REPAIRING ANU All. KINDS OF 
WASIIIM. IJONK AT KKASONAKI.K 
PRICKS. 

Opposite Pott Office 



THIS WEEK END!!! 

Are you going to the house dance? 
OVERCOATS, 

Amherst 



There must be something you need. Drop in and see the new shipment of 
SUITS, HATS, SHOES, NECKTIES 

CARL Ha BOLTER iiyanm. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 28, 1925 



I Town Hall, Amherst 
kil^Utl.t lit. ill I tie lll-.IV IS 



Wed. 

ami 

Thurs. 

3.00, 7..10 



Friday 

3.00, 6.45 
8.30 



Saturday 

3.00, 4.45 
8.30 



Mifthiitr Ihun I he play U 
the mollon picture version 
„f "TIIK POOL" 
Channlnft Pollock's Area! 
play, with Kdmund Lowe, 
Paul Panzer, tieorfte l.essey 
and Mary Thurman. You 
will hear this pit- lure talked 
of fi>r yearn. Do not fall to 
see It. One of I he hlftgest ■ 
sialic successes In yearn. I 

Ntw, l-' ahlcw Comedy | 

Wm PeMlllc's 

•• NI.W BROOMS" 
Frank Craven's Ureal Stag* 
hit. with Nell Hamilton 
and llessie l.ove. The Ureal 
comedy of the American 
home. 

Sportllftht Comedy 

[Hill! I.ove, Warner ButCff 
and Raymond Hat ton In 
•A SON OK HIS KATIII K 
Harold Hell Wrlftht's latest 
and by far fcrcalest novel. I 
1.,-c inning story of the ever 
, hanftlnft West 

New* Comedy 



YE AGGIE INN 

OPERATED BY THE STUDENTS 



SI RVICi OPJJRATBU di inioiDUftnio (QUALITY) 

National Note Books, Stationery, Parker, Waterman, Conklin, Chilson fountain pens, Toilet articles. 

" Everything the student needs for the class-room or his person. 
A. H. Dooli.tle •» R B. Sa.yer '26 R. H. Wh.te 26 R. H.ntse •» V- ™t 'H 



Mon. 

3.00, 6.45 
8.30 



Alec B. I -'ranch*. Jacqueline 
|,oi>un. (ieoriie O'llrlen and 
Goo. Kawcetl In 

THANK YOU" 
\\ int hell Smith's ntafte play 
hi l, nn appeal Inft comedy 
drama of "back home folks 
Path* Review Comedy 



THOMAS S. CH1LDS 

INCORPOKA TED 



275 High St. 



Holyoke 



s h oe S 

— AND— 

H O S 1 B R Y 

of Quality and Fashion for 
M. A. C. Students 

Harry B. Herman, 1920 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 

IS AT 

.DRURY'S 

College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



INDEX PICTURES 

iConlinued from Page 1) 

arrive promptly on the minute, or better, 
■ lew minute* beforehand. The picture* 
will be takni at the time ie1 and all those 
who are late will of necessity be left out. 
Fraternity house pre*ide»ta, chairmen 
of committees, etc., are asked to set thai 
their gTOup* know of the appointed time 

for their picture and then get their men 
to the "Micro" building OB time. All 
picture* will be taken in the Microbiology 

building. 
Absolute conformity to schedule will be 

insisted 6a and there will l>e no waitiiiR 
overtime for groups 10 assemble. 

Individual pictures of juniors will be 
taken Monday. A srhedule ot Bitting* has 
been made out, which in most cases will 
conform to the individual's free periods. 
This schedule will be posted during the 
week. It is essential that individuals 
arrive promptly at the required time, 
otherwise they will lose- their chance to 
be photographed. 

Saturday, October 31st 
BJO a.m. Girl's Glee Club 



FRK.MIMEN SOPHOMORKS JUNIORS SENIORS ATHLETES 

Do You Know? 
"HOW TO STUDY" 

The Students Hand-Book of Practical Hints on the Technique of 

Effective Study 
by WILLIAM ALLAN BROOKS 

A GLIDE mm.enin.. hundreds of practical Wats *^ *"*,€&! jiJjjS 
economy ol learning, t<> as.ii.-t students In securing MAXIMUM ncium.asii^ 
RESULTS .it a minimum coat ol time, energy, and tanee*. 

ESPECIALLY RECOMMENDED for overworked students sad athletes 

engaged In eatra cuniculum actlvitlei and lb* average and honor students who 
ai<- working tor hi^h scholastic ai tueveawat. 

Some of the Topics covered 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While V Wait 

NEW PRICES 
Men's Whole Soles. Rubber Heels - • - SJ.M 
Mens Half Soles. Rubber Heels - - - «-7S 
Mens Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels - - J » 

Mens Half Soles »•*• 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOUSE 
Open till 8 P.M. 



HAVE YOU SEEN 

Tbe Horthampton Repertory Company 

of excellent Kntlllsh Players now at 

—THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC— 

Northampton, .*. Paul Hansell. Mgr. 

Week of Oct. 2*— The play is the hum5rous 
Comedy -ELIZA COMES TO STAY " by 
H . V. Esmond 

Neit week It la the Bernstein masterpiece 
"THE THIEF". The time is 

Evenings at 8.15 Sat. Mat. at 2.15 
Prices: $1.10. 85c. 50c. 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



ll.(K) 

ii ir. 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



8.45 " Delta Phi Gamma 
9.00 " Women's Student Council 
9.15 " Collegian 
•JO " Roister Doisters 
'.1.45 " Index 

K).(K) " Informal Committee (1927) 
10.15 " Debating Team 
10.30 " Soph-Senior Hop Com. (1927) 
10.45 " Junior Prom Com. (1927) 
11.00 " Maroon Key 

Sunday, November l*t 
10.00 a.m. Senior class picture on chapel 

steps 
10.15 " Freshman class picture on 

chapel steps 
10.45 " Q.T.V. fraternity (at Micro 
building) 
I'hi Sigma Kappa 
Kappa Sigma 
U JO " Theta Chi 
11.45 " Kappa Gamma PW 
12.00 " Sigma I'hi Kpsilon 
1 1». 15 " Lambda Chi Alpha 
[2,30 " Alpha Sigma I'hi 
l..'}0 p.m. Joint Committee OO Inter- 
collegiate Athletics 
1.45 " Academic Activities Board 
2.15 " Honor Council 
2J0 " Senate 
2.45 " Adelphia 
3.00 " Alpha Gamma Rho 
;i.i5 " Kappa Epnuon 
:{..{() " Delta Phi Alpha 
8.48 " C.lec Club 
4.(K) " Orchestra 

Monday, November 2nd 
Individual pictures (to be posted later). 
Junior and sophomore class pictures 
will be taken immediately after chapel 
on Stockbridge si en-. 

S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 

Oculists Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenses 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable make* 



Scientific Shortcuts in Effective 

Study. 
Preparing for Eliminations. 
Writing Cood Examinations, 
lir.iin and Digestion In Relation 

to Study. 
How to Take Lecture and Reading 

Notes. 
Advantages and Disadvantages of 

Cramming. 



Diet During Athletic Training. 
How to Study Modern Languages. 
How to Study Science. Literature, 

etc. 
Why (lo to College? 
After College. What? 
Developing Concentration and 

Efficiency. 
The Athlete and His Studies, 
etc., etc., etc.. etc., etc., etc., 



Why You Need This Guide 

"It is safe to say that failure to guide and direct study is the weak point in 
the whole educational machine. Prof. G. M. Whipple. University 01 Michigan. 

The successful men in college do not seem to be very happy. Most of them, 
especially the athletes are overworked." Prof. H. S. Canby, Yale. 

"Misdirected labor, though honest and well intentioned may lead to naught. 
Among the most important things for the student to learn is how to study. With- 
out knowledge of this his labor may be largely in vain. Prof. U KSw am ,_ M. 1. 1 

•To students who have nevei learnt "How to Study, 'work is very oiten a 
chastisement, a flagellation, and an insuperable obstacle to contentment. frol. 
A lnglis, Harvard. 

"HOW TO STUDY" will show you how to avoid all misdirected effort. 

Get a good start and make this year a highly successful one by sending 
for this hand-tiook and guide NOW. 

You Need This Intelligent Assistance 

American Student Publishes*. 
22 West 43rd St. New YorV. 



CLIP! 
AND MAIL 
TODAY 



Gentlemen: 

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which I enclose S1.00 cash, $1 .10 check. 

Name 

Address 



for 



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for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 

ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST & DEACON. Props. 



WRKLEYS 



EVERY 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 




WANTED: A man between the age of 25 and 35 to 
represent us in Northampton to take the place of H. E. 
Robbins, a former teacher at M.A.C., whom we recently 
promoted to manager in eastern Connecticut. Several 
teachers whom we have hired in the past two or three 
years have been very successful with us. Unusual oppor- 
tunity for the right man. 

HARRY E. BARLOW, Manager 

Connecticut General Life Ins. Co. 
387 Main St. 

Springfield, Mass. 




popularity of 
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great dividend* for so small 
an outlay. * It keeps teeth 
clean, breath sweet, appetite 
keen, digestion good. 

Fresh and full-flavored 
always in its wax -wrapped 
package. 




For Men who Demand Style— 

You will find nothing more satisfac- 
tory than one of our new Fall suits 
that we have just unpacked. The 
price you will find reasonable as is true 
of everything that we sell. 

Winter Overcoats are also ready. Pick 
yours out now while the assortment 
is at its best. 



F. M. Thompson & Son 



TV™** Economy Is Always Found In Quality •— 

THUS . a o„.v -at-. «Ha« .ore lHanever .Hose who appreciate , = style -< -'^^^^^^^^ 
finds us equipped with everything to combat old man Winter from Leather mittens «£°™p» HWICK BROS. & GAULT 



Q\\t jfflagHarfrttggttB fflnlbntan 



Vol. xxxvi. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, NOV. 4, 1925 



N< 



PHI KAPPA PHI 
TAKES IN SEVEN 

Thre* Co-eds Among Those Blsctad 

t( , Honorary Society. President 
Sellaon ol Smith Speaks at Assem 1 . ly. 



1 In Assembl) lad Thursdaj afternoon 

given over in tbe Phi Kappa Phi 

i . Dr. Henrj I Fernald, president 

(ll (],, local ch iptei . presided af the 

initiation ol tin- new member*. 

Hi,- following student- were initiated: 
I Barber <>f Jamaica Rain, 
Maude L. Boaworth ol Holyoke, Erne*) 
\ pick of Lawrence, Alton H. Gustafson 
,,i Brockton, Alvah W. Jone* ol Salisbury ■ 
Mabel M. MncMa*ter* of Aahburnham 
anil Margaret I'. Smith of Taunton. The 
thru- member* of tbe faculty to be 
initiated were Dr. Charie* P, Alexander, 
Assistant Proftaaor »>! Entomology ; 
Will, ml I'. Jones, instructor of Agronomy; 
ami K.ilph A. Van Meter, profeeaor of 

Pomoli 

Following the initiation, President 
William A. Neilson of Smith College k-^' 
an UlJllma* I'resiilent NetlaOfl s|M>kf on 
tbt ih.iracteristics of Euro|>ean college* 
aivl some of tbe maaoaa why such a 
n as I'hi Kappa I'hi has aevet In MM 
>t,irtiil there. He saiil that until tin 
preaenl day nothing like this society ha> 
ever existed in Enrope and even now it 
ba* not taken root. Aocordiaf to I'resi 
deal Neilson, the Knglish uni\er>ities do 
not differ greatly from those in thi^ 
country. The main difference is in the 

srkolar*. The English m1io1.ii> fall into 

t«n ilifferent groups which President 
Niilxm called the "honor" students ami 
the "pa>s" students. The "pas>" sludeiii- 
an tboae who do the minimum amount 
<>t work and do not intend to enter a 
profession. College is for them a sort of 
a fini>hing school. The "honor" student I 
on the other hand are those who <\p«i i 
tn eater ■ profession. College is lor them 
a place to get an education. TtsBM two 
drvkwo* of the Knglish college therefore 
sain In place of our honorary mm i, 

He said that in England a> in America 

more and more men are going to college 
and that the "pass" students are gradu- 
ally lieing pushed out. President NeiUoii 
ttid in closing. "C.etting by i- a most 
silly ami wasteful way. Perspective in 
the In Id of knowledge is not gained In 

peeking here and three, it cease* l»y rifling 

nir own pile of learning." 



FALL FLOWER SHOW 
COMING NEXT WEEK\ 

Kxhibition will be Open to General 
Public on Nov. 14 and 15. 



Five Houses 

Have Dances 



The annual fall Sower show \.v ill lu- 
lu-Id in French Hall on November 13, 1 1. 
,[iu\ l."i. Tin- Floriculture Department i> 
making everj effort to make thi> year's 
show surpass all pre\ ion* one* held at t In 
college. 

Competition among tin Mui'i-nt-. will 
be unusual!) keen th^ year and will In- 
open to four-year and two-yeai student* 

who are majoring in floriculture. The 

contest* are a* follow*: table decoration*, 
open to senior* in the four-yeai course; 
basket arrangements, open to junior* in 
the four-year course; bowl and vase 
display*, open to two-yeai students. 
Chrysanthemum* will predominate in the 

1 >how although rose* and i at n.it i, m- an 
to Ik- used. All the llowei- u-ed in the 

competition are grown in the college 

greenhouses. 

On Friday evening, November b'l, the 
exhibit will be open only to members of 
the M.AC, florist and Garden Club nod 
to the Holyoke and Northampton Florist 

and Garden Clltb. <>n Saturday the dis 
ptay will be open to the general public 
from S a. in. to ."> p. in., and on Sunday 
from 1 p. m. to U p. in. On Saturday 

evening the show will be open to member* 
ol the faculty. 
In connection with the fhwrer show the 

annual Skinner i up competition for the 

twelve best chrysanthemum blooms will 

lie -taged. The cup is given by Mis- 
belle Skinner of Holyoke and i- pre 
sented each year. For the last two \eai- 
it lias been awarded to "Doc" Connor of 
MAC. 



Small Attendance at 

First Mass Meeting 



Much Enthusiasm Shown on Eve of 
Amherst Game. 



The second mass meeting ol the year 
■M held last Thursday night in Stock- 
bridge Hall. The parade, which w.i- 
inade up of an enthusiastic but com- 
paratively small group of students, 
started in front of the Q.T.V. House at 
sbout 7 p. in., and, with much vocifcrou — 
and hilarity, proceeded to Stock- 
bridge Hall. There a program of cheering 
and speeches was in order, and wa- greeted 
inthu-i.i-tically. Much time was given 
t» practising the new "Massachusetts" 
r, with fine results, as was demon- 
strated during the Amherst game. The 
speakers for the occasion wen-: Dean 
Machmer, "Dick" Metlen, Prof. Hick*, 
and "Pop" Clark; all of whom were 
(Continued on Pafte 4) 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Thursday — 

5 p, m, Assembly. Speaker, 
Rev. |. H. Nolaml of Springfield. 

Friday— 
p. in. Freshman football. Deerfield 
Academy at Deerfield. 

nighl iN; Night-shirt parade. 

Saturday — 

b' m'a Board. 

ity Croas-country. M.A.C. vs. 
Boston Univ. at Boston. 

Year Football. Drury High at 
North Adams. 
11 U*e Dame at Sigma Phi Kpsilon. 
Sunday — 
9.10a.m. Sunday Chapel. Speaker, 
Rev. James Gordon Gilkey, South 
( "tigregational Church, Spring- 
Id. 



Informal to Come 

After Tuft's Game 

Sale of Tickets will be Limited to 
Sixty Couples. 

Plans are under way for an Informal on 
Saturday. November 91st, alter the 
I uit> M.A.C. game. Tickets and pro 
grama will be rand) for distribution 
Monday, November Bth. 

Having in mind the great demand for 

ticket- at the last Tuft- Informal, tin 
committee ha* decided to limit the sale 
oi rickets to afartj couptea, in order to 
preven t an overcrowded hall and thus 
insure comfortable dancing for all who 

attend. 

TkketS may be procured from Cormier 

'l'H. Gustafson '28, Needhara '2b, 'nd 
Council '27. 



BISHOP McCONNElX SPEAKS 

ON CHRISTIAN HONESTY 

Methodist Bishop is Speaker at First 
Sunday Chapel. 

"Christian Honesty" was the subject of 
the sermon delivered by Bishop Francia 

J. McConnell ol the Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Pittsburg, Pa., who was the 
speaker at the lir-t Siuid.n < ha|iel ol t he 
college year. "Christian honesty," said 
Bi-liop Mi < oimell, "is much more than 
ordinary hone-ty. A man may be s< rupu- 
lou-ly honest in hi- bu-iin— affairs, and 
still not be honest with himself." The 
speaker continued hi- definition of "Chris- 
tian Honesty" by saying that it mean- 
being perfectly frank with one'- sell con- 
cerning one's inner purpose* and ideas. 
Main people, he said, live solel) to make 
money, but are unwilling to admit it to 
themselves; while in tin matter of religion, 
the situation i- full) as had: there an ,i 
i many people who are afraid to a-k 
themselves just what their religious 
beliefs are. Thisisnol Christian honesty. 

RAZOO NIGHT TO 

GOME THIS FRIDAY 



Boxing and Wrestling Bouts will be 
Held on Athletic Field. 

The boxing and wrestling bouts and the 
night shirt parade will be held Friday 

night. No v e m ber 6th, at 7..'io, on tin- 
lower level of the athletic field under the 
flood lights. There will be four boxing 
matches and three wrestling matches for 
which the class captains, Thomas '28 and 
Johnson '29 are busy preparing their 

prospects, 

The night shirt parade will Ik- held 
after the liouts and will be governed by 
the same rules which were used last year. 



Kappa Sigma, Phi Sigma Kappa, 
Q. T. V., lambda CM Alpha and 
Theta Chi Celebrate After Game 



Five 

telllil v 



louse parties were held on "fra 
low" last Saturdaj after the 
Amherst game, and each waa conatdered 
t great success, A feature common to all 
oi the dances waa tbe large number who 
took part, ami the striking Hallowe'en 
decora t ions consisting chiefly of com 

-talk-, pumpkin- ami jack lanterns 

with all -mi- ,,t weird lighting effects, 
I lie large number of alumni who had 
come Lack to the game helped to make 
the dance- a SUCCCSS. 

The bouse part) at Kappa Sinma was 
attended l«\ thirty couples and sever* 
stag*, Mu-ic furnished by Moon Mullin'a 

Melodious Musi, Makers cnlivem-.l the 

festive affair which wa- catered bj Harry 

Till, of Northampton. The chaperonc 

from Mt. Hol y oke College wa- Mis- E, 

V Martin and the local chaperons wen- 
Professor and Mrs. W'augh. Much ol the 
credit for the artistic Hallowe'en decora- 
tions was due tO "Johnny" White. 

The Phi Sigmi Kappa dance, which 
wa- attended b\ about twenty-live couples 
wa- provided with music liy Dcl.incv's 
oi chest ta of Holyoke. The chaperones 
were Miss Susan K. Benedict from Smith 
College and Miss M. ( ). Miller from Ml. 
Holyoke. Dinner was served at I )rapei 
Hall. 

The house party at CbT.Y. fraterniiv 
wa- marked by a large attendance of 
thirty five couples and live -tag-. Music 
wa- luini-hed by "Hcrbic" Gray son- 
orchestra, and refreshments were served 
liy the house. Mrs. Hubbard was the 
chaperonc from Mt. Holyoke. The local 
chaperones were Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
M. < .ore. 

Twenty-two couples joined in the 
(Continued on Pafte 4) 

FRESHMEN TRIUMPH 

OVER SOPHOMORES 

Numeral Game Goes to Frosh by 
H — Score. 



The freshmen triumphed over the 
-ophomore- in the annual numeral game 
b\ a score ol g to on Alunini Field 

Monday afternoon. Their first tally came 

a- a result of a bad pass to ( a|ione, who 
wa- back of the sophomore goal line for a 
kick. The ball rolled behind the goal 
|Mi-ts. Inn Capone fell on it for a safety. 
The freshmen threatened to -con in 

qucntly, but were unable to push the pig 
skin across until the final quarter. Alter 
blocking a kick, they were presented with 
fifteen yarde on ■ penally, and then 

Kelley went over lor the only tou c hdo wn 

of the game. 

lor the most part, the hall was in 
sophomore territory, but the freshmen 

were unable to acore because of frequent 

fumble- on their own part and the .il.-n 
nee* of their rivals in re c ov erin g fumbles. 

The '2'.t line was particularly strong, but 
the -ophomore- made substantial gain- 
by I he overhead route. 

'The freshmen tack lea, < ox and Johnson 
played aa agrcssive game, and Bracldey, 

i novice at center, did well. Nitkiewicx, 

their little fullback gave an excellent 

exhibition of line plunging, and Kellej 
made several long punt-. Tor the sopho- 
mores, Kicker and Karrer on cull end of 
i he line played a good game, and Capom 
threw several long forward passes which 
were accurately placed. Summary: 



Fighting Agates Crushed 

by Lord Jeffs, 27 

Mohardt's Hashes Feature (»rid Battle for Town Supren 
Crowd of 10,0(10 Jams Pratt I ielri 






a 



AMHERST BEATEN 

IN CROSS COUNTRY 

lane of Amherst Finishes First. Inn 
Entire Agjfde Team Follows Close 

lie bind. 

The M.A.C. cross countrj team an 

in Mil .mother victory bj defeating 

Amherst on flic Aggie course last Fridaj 

liv a Mine ol 23 tO 38. lane ot \mhersl 

finished first, covering the route in 96 
minute* and 54 second*, the fastest time 

that ha- been made over the M.A.C 

course in the last fee years, if not ■ new 
record. He wa- followed by Preston ol 

Aggie who made a great sprint al t he 
finish to CUt down hi- opponent's lead by 
manv yard*. Ila/eltineol Amherst came 
in fourth, but the remainder of I he 
Amherst team was outdistanced by the 
home club. 

It is interesting to note thai Weslevan, 
the onlv college tO deleat M.A.C. in cro-s 

country this fall, recently vanquished the 

Springfield Y.M.C.A. College haiiiei-, 

erstwhile conquerora ol the Vale team. 

The order in which the men finished in 
the Amherst meet was as follows: l.ane 
(A), I'reston (Ml, Wheeler (M), lla/.l 
tine (Al, Crooks (Mi, Swan (Ml, N'otta 

baert (M), Biron (Mi, ban let t (Mi. 

Tompkins (Al, Sargent (A), Clarke (Al, 

Hughe* (A i. 

TWO YEARS CONQUER 
VERMONT ACADEMY 



Ryan Runs 50 Yards for First Score 
of II — Victory. 



Ihe Two yefjff eleven added anothei 
victOff) tO i's unbroken string hv out 

playing Vermont Acade my , h'l to 0, at 
Sexton's River, Vermont, last Friday 
The Vermont boy- wen- never dangerous, 
failing to push the ball inside tbe Two 
Year's K) yard stripe at any rime. Ryan 
scored the initial touchdown in the 

lir-l peiiod when In (inked up I tumble 
and ran BO yard- to SCOte. The second 

counter came in the final quarter aftet 
the ball had been carried up the field for 

forty yard*. Loose handling ol the pill 
prevented a higher score from lieing 
amassed. 

Kelley and Tribe in the liacklield ami 
Ryan and Slulnut in the line displayed 
the Ix-st form for the Massachti-ci I s boys, 
while Lanier and Hardy starred lor 

Vermont Academy. The aununarj : 



Two Year 

burrill, re 
Shelnul, rt 

Bttrgevin, rg 
Lovejo) , c 
( alf rey, Ig 

Ryan, It 

\ iale. le 
Truelson. <|li 
Kelley, llil. 

1 1 d.e, rhb 
Johnson, 1 1 » 

I ouchdowna Ryan, 



Vermon t 
le, MacKeay 

It, Hitchcock 

Ig, Whitney 

c Fuller 

rg, W'eb-tei 

n . ( ollin- 

n . ( .i.imlv 

(|b, Hard) 
rhb, I ■'■ 
Ihb. Smile) 

Hi, I aw lot 

Tribe. Points 



VU9 

Bowie, le 
Cox, li 

Kn iiibaiiin, Ig 

Braclde) . < 
McKittrick, rg 

John- hi. rt 

Foster, re 
Mills, qb 

Kelley, Ihh 

Kay, rhb 
Nitkiewicx, fb 



192X 

re. Kicker 

rt. 'I mil. 

rg. Trull 

. Cunningham 

lg, Lincoln 

It, Plant inga 

le, Karrer 

(|l>, < .IpOl)!- 

rhb, Flemings 
Ihh, Redgrave 

fl>, Quinn 



Touchdown — Kelley. Safe! y — ( 'apone. 
Substitutions: lb2'.l — RedqutSt for Howie, 
Sullivan for Krcinbaum, Bailey for 
Foster, Sevrens for Kay. 1988 Man 
for Lincoln, Mulhern for Cunningham. 
Referee— Hicks. Cmpires — Gavin and 
Jones. Head linesman — Smith. Time — 
1(1 and 12 minute periods. 



from trv lor |x,ini after touchdown 
Truelson. Substitutions: Two Yeai 
Wilson for Caffrey, Young for Ryan, 
Prouty for Vi.de. Massa tor I 
Ma--, i for Kelle) . Reft rei Mut . 
I mpire Reynolds. Time 12 mmuti 

period-. 

Pyle Heads Junior 

Prom. Committee 

Council, (.ritfen, llaertl and Verity 
are Other Members. 



Everett I. I'yh- of Plymouth waa 

elected chairman of the Junior I'rom 
Committee at the meeting ol the Junior 

la-i week. 'The other member* ot 
the committee who will assist are Edward 
A. Council of Maiden, Raymond <>. 
Griffen ol Southwick, Edwin J. Haertl of 
Dorchester, and Herbert T. Verity ol 
YVoburn. The committee haa already 

Started work OB the plans and details for 
the coming Prom and hope* to make it 
as good, if not better, than the Hop of 
last June. 



\ fighting \l \ I i leven although 
beaten bv autistic* J7 to 0, dv tin- 
Amherst gridster*, were nevei beaten in 
spirit, m the contest played at Pratt 
in Id i,i-i Saturda) before a i rowd ol 
10,000. The Agate*, evei ■ group of 
pluggera but rare!) ila-hv , could handle 
ih»- Purple'* line plays throughout the 

name liul the llceliic- ,,! the \iii| H .|s t 

back* baffled the Aggie defease <• igh 

to enable the Lord hit i to run up 
points. Iin I runs and off ta« kh play* 
were fatal but Amherst nevei proved 
dangerous by the overhead route and 
M.A.C, completer) -topped attentate to 

gain through I In- line. 

'The scoring started in the opening 

minute-. Amherst's second team repot id 

l"i ili- first lineup. M.A.C. received and 

Mobarg carried the ball thirteen v. mis 

tO their thirty-eight yard mark. Ilnee 
line playl netted loin vaiib and Mobeie. 

kicked to Mohardt on his tnirty»iv* v. ml 

line. Like a llash he dodged to I he side 
line and lollowing reinai kahly closclv 
the edge of the field he sprinted to the 
goal line before the aiua/ed Aggie looi. i 

Willi the peiiod hall gone, an M A.C. 
punt went olfside on the Amheist thirty- 
lliree -yard slri|M-, paving the wav for 
another Amheist score which came soon 

afterward* when Mohardt circled the end 
and dashed tlafaty yards to the Aggie aero 
iii. iik. 

With fourteen |khiiI- against them, the 

visitor* atartad ■ ajjjrch which brought 

bop* in the MAC. stands. The slashing 
line bucks by llilvaril and the end plavs 
bv Sullivan and Moberg canied (he ball 
si\iv live vatib Inline it was tinned over 
in Amherst. This drive went into i he 
second period and the Sabrinas' regulars 
all went in as the teams changed god- 

Anilni-I tallied again in this period as 
a leaill ol bSBCfcktg aU AgfOSI i 'ill 1 1 ku ked 
from I he goal line. ( adigan went through 

t.u kh- on the neat play for the count. 

Hut again the lighting Agates came 

Ii.ii k. < ouhig, the little Aggie i tutor, 
intercepted a pass behind the Ambers! 

line ol scrimmage hv absolute ileveimss 
and allei Stumbling over a • ouple ot his 
surprised teammate- went to the Iwcntv 
yard line. Sullivan and Iblv.ml advamed 
the ball lourleeii vaids and a |»ciialty 
gave M.A < . tin oval on ihe Lord Jell's 
I luce yard-line. On the thud down, 
Sullivan was thrown lor a four y.ml 

loss. In a desperate attempt to score, 
Moberg threw a pass but Drew ol Amherst 
intercepted it thu- depriving the north- 
end ol the town team ot then second 

i ham e to tallv . 

The second half was tighter. Neither 
aggregation could gain i on-i-lenl ly al- 
though the Sabrinas scored m the la-i 
period after a long pass from Cadigan to 
Moore. A forward pass wa- tried for I he 

extra |H»int Inn it a/a* grounded in- 

compli li . 

oiivioii-iv Mohardt w. t - the brilliaan 

individual ol the name. |)n w, Amherst'fl 

lla-liv negro halfback, waa itopped marly 

every time he carried the bill. Sullivan 

wa- the outstanding M.A.< . hall carrier, 
gaining consistently, and making several 
first down-. Couhig played a good 
defensive game hv bis comttanl alertm 
while Hilyard lucked up the lim well by 
hard, sure tackling, in spite of the fa i 

that Amherst u-ed twenty-five men the 

• bowed uperior i ondition even ,,i 

the end, tackling haul and fighting for 

J inch. I be -ilium. i' 

ft inhere! \la.c 

vim . . li re, Jonas 

m, h rt, \iii-tein 

Prati . lg i Inn low 

Rii haid-oii. i i . < ouhig 

Hi^^ui-, rg I id, nko 

Lyons, rt li , ' Savin 

I ...iiilnii. (I nn Page 2) 



OPPONENTS SCORES 

Hates 7, Bowdotn <> 
Vermont 3, Norwich 
Conn. Aftfties 19, Manhattan 
Worcester 26, K. I. State Is 
M.I I ii, Lowell Textile 
New Hampshire '.I, Tufts 6 
Springfield 20, It. L. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. NOV. 4, 1925 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official WW»p»P«r <>f *• Mawachu kfttl 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wadaaaday by the sttsdaa** 

HOARD OF EDITORS 

Makv T. Ion » K.litor-i..r( IbU 



JQHN F. LAMHI.KT '20 



Masaciaj Mitoi 



Editorial 
Cider Press 
Athletic* 

Campus News 



■96 

•27 



Co-Ed News 

Faculty News 



DEPARTMENT BDlTOli 

mmv t. Boys 

Mary T. BOW 
wii.i.iam i.. Dols 

IlAKOI.D I. tl.ARK 

Ravmoni. r. Dihkv '27 
Imiswhiii Haknakd 91 

Joskl'IlINK l'ANZICA '2H 
1-KANtl-S C. BaSKS '27 
■MUM L. Spkncek '2s 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Alvik G. Stevens 26 Business Mana K er 

EdwTn A. W.ldeh'28 Adverting Manager 

Swls H. WH.TAKE. "27 Circulation Manager 

John E. White 27 

Douglas W. UHhW 

Charles F. Clago '27 



Subscription J2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

B „ lmH „„ gecond-class matter at the Amherst 
PonC^^Acrld for mai.ing «-^»£ 
of postage provided for in section 1MB. Act ot uc 
tober, 1917 authorized August 20, 191H. 



ltii> step, in view of thr fact that l>\ tin 

time il»- scrap ocasw peraossfJ ratatlwM 
will have been cstabiishrd between tht 
two classes, tad possibly pewooal antafo- 
nisms will be vented during the itruggle. 
I bit, however, in vie* o4 the sterling 
Aggie sportsmanship, Menu unlikely. 

It is Interesting to note that theac 
modifications <>! our eiread) Ugh! ha/inn 

Ml i" line with similar changes which 

...c being made in mark everj college in 
the country. The Connecticiit Agricul- 
tural College is among the latest to put ■ 
ban <ii ha/in^. By «nler of the President 
of the college, baaing is entirely abo li s h ed 
and the picturesque nocturnal parade ol 
Freshmen singing "How Green We Are" 
to a lusty accompaniment of paddles 

wielded by the capable hands of the 
upiicnlassincn, banished from the campus 
forever. The C.A.C. hazing rules are 
entirely comprehensive, and read in part: 
"Any initiation ceremony <>r practical 

joking that involves physical, p erson a l 

injury, or bodily harm, or the perform- 
ance, under threat of force of any action 
that entails the surrender of one's self 
respect, shall be deemed hazing." 

The modern trend is toward the elimi- 
nation of college hazing. The next 
question is: How are the freshmen of 
the future to be disciplined? 




Down at Pratt Field 

It was during the tense silence- that 
followed an uiisue . essful attempt on the 
part ol the team that a sweet feminine- 
voice was heard to cry out comfortingly, 
••\e-ve-r mind, boys!" 



AT THE ABBEY 



Did you see- the- Amherst police force 

tending <>ut the lo q uaciou s gentleman 

who expressed his sentiments in language 
inspired by his spirituous director.' 



"Collegiate" 

We are very weary of this eternal mis- 
representation of the college athlete. 

The athlete is primarily a college 
student. H he were not, he would not 
have a chance to be an athlete. Playing 
on a college team is not the exclusive 
privilege of the big and dumb. Modern 
athletics call for as much brain as brawn 

anyway. 

But can you convince the reading 
public of that? No. The movies and the 
collegiate novels and the scintillating 
short stories about life at dear old Blah- 
blah, and the new primrose-pathological 
studies, have done their work all too well. 
Try an association test on the first man 
you meet on the street. What is his re 
action to "athlete"? Right. "Dumb" or 
mivalent. 

W crowning insult came a few weeks 
when a book purporting to give hints 
How to Study", which from a survey 
„. .ne offered contents we translated to 
mean something like "How to get away 
with as little studying as possihlc" ap- 
peared under the arresting heading of 
"Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors, 
Athletes". Interesting, to say the least. 
Athletes— among, but not of, the college 

students? 

If these advertisers, representing a 
fairly well-informed stratum of American 
society, can so advertise— and in a college 



IMPROVE YOUR ENGLISH 

In response to a news letter sent out 
last year by the Department of Land- 
scape C.ardening, Professor Waugh has 
recently received from one of the older 
graduates the following statement: "In 
your news letter I note you are using 
greater pressure to secure a more thorough 
training in English for all of your land- 
scape students. Although I perhaps 
failed to realize the importance of English 
courses while in college, now that I have 
been out for eleven years I appreciate 
more and more the necessity of thorough 
training in English, as the landsca|>c 
arc hitect is called upon to deliver addres 
ses and lectures, and to converse in 
general with the better class of people 
with whom the proper use of English 
language makes a very favorable im- 
pression." 



Feature of the game: "Potato chips. 
All fresh! Money back if you don't like 
them. Potato c hips?", at all moments, 
possible and ini|>ossible. We saw one 
man buy some just for the pleasure of 
watching the vendor give him his money 
back, but unfortunately in the excitement 
of the game he ate them all. 

Other features: peanuts and programs. 
The programs were rendered somewhat 
less useful by the carelessness of the 
players in ap|>earing in jerseys numbered 
differently from those scheduled. So that 
one commented freely on the playing of 
"X" only to find out, from the Amherst 
cheering, that it had been "Y" all along. 



paper 



! — what must be the attitude of the 
iHi well informed? The situation is 
impossible. 

It is time for someone to tell the truth 
about the college athlete. As a matter of 
record, they are as a group well above the 
average- of intelligence. The misinformed, 
for example-, might be interested to hear 
that in California there is a girl named 
Helen Wills, holder of a Phi Beta Kappa 
key, who is. in spite of her intelligence 
able to play quite a good game of tennis. 

Or, if they will come to MAC. (popu- 
larly known as Amherst Aggie!) we can 
show them one of our foremost athletes 
a member of Phi Kappa Phi. Which 
should also interest the short story 
writers and the movie scenario concoct ers 
and the novelists and the other agents 
for the propagation of misinformation. 

The athlete is a college student with a 
special aptitude for athletic sports. But 
how many know that? 



Dr. Arthur W. Gilbert '04, Commis- 
sioner of Agriculture in Massachusetts, 
presided at the annual legislative con- 
ference of the Agricultural Organization 
in Worcester, October 22. The college 
was represented by Mr. Carlton D. 
Richardson, a member of the Board of 
Trustees, Prof. Laurence H. Parker of 
the faculty and Director Sidney B. 
Haskell of the Experiment Station. Among 
the large number of alumni present were 
Mr. Evan I". Richardson '87, Mr. Joseph 
H. Putnam 'S)4, Mr. Elmer If. Poole "08, 
Mr. Willard A. Munson "05, Mr. S. 
Lothrop Davenport '08, Mr. Frederick I). 
Criggs '18, Mr. Francis W. Small '14, and 
Mr. Philip F. Whitmore '15. The place 
held by Aggie men in the agriculture of 
the state is shown by the fact that nearly 
one-third of those present at the con- 
ference were either graduates or affiliated 
with the college in one way or another. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

"M F. E. Buckley, who has been 
doing landscape work in California, is 
on his way home to Natick. 

'24 Robert Steers is assistant director 
at Conyer's Fruit Farms, at Greenwich, 

Conn. 

'25 Samuel W. Lunt is working at 
Conyer's Fruit Farms, at Greenwich, Ct. 



Chief feature: Our Band. 

CP 

Revenge ! 

Last night when o'er the elm trees 
The golden moon appeared to view; 

I did the thing that many men 
Have vowed for many years to do. 

I've never so ecstatic been! 

"I've killed," I cry with joyous shout; 
"The man who made the clock strike ten 

The nights I had a co-ed out." E. L. 

Have you a what-you-may-call-it? 

The "whoozis" you never can think of 
just when you need it has a wide variety 
of names— following is a list collected in 
various parts of the country by a writer 
in "The American Mercury". Have you 
any additions to suggest? Have we any 
one particular favorite on the campus? 
What do you call a thing when you can't 
remember its real name? 

Here is the list referred to: 

Thingumbob, thingumajig, thinguma- 
doddle, dingus, dingbat, doofunny, doo- 
dad, doodaddle, doogood, dooflickus, 
doojohn, doohickey, doobobbus, doobiddy, 
doowhackey, gadget, fumadiddle, dink- 
tum, jigger, fakus, kadigin, thumadoddle, 
optriculum, ringumajig, hoopendaddy, 

dibble. 

CP 

Addendum to "Ford Names" 

Our attention is called to a serious 
omission in our recent list of Flivver 
nomenclature. We hereby make amends 
for not including 

"There's Beauty in Every Jar." 

CP 

Genius Plus 
Teacher: Define "obesity". 
Willis (his father is a professor and his 
mother is dieting): Obesity is the infinite 
capacitv for taking gains. 
CP 



The first co-ed dance of the reason WMB 

held in the Memorial Building last Friday 

evening, under the auspices ol the- \A\. 

C.A., and proved to be ■ great l ucce as. 
Over seventy couples a tten de d , "the men 

being drawn almost entirely from M.A.C. 

and Amherst." The music- was furnished 

by Moon Mullin's Melodious Music 
Makers and was good, as usual. The- hall 

was appropriately deco ra ted with corn 

stalks, jack-o'lantcrns, and ghosts. Dur- 
ing the middle of the e ven ing , the- last 

mentioned came to life and performed in 

"Dutch" Aneell'l Inst style, later proving 
to be "Dutch" himself. The chaperones 
were Mr. and Mrs. Uanna of Amherst, 
Mrs. Chapman of Newtonville, and Mrs. 
Flint of West Newton. 

M 

Among the guests at the Abbey this 
last week-end were Edna Mather "Zi, 
Molly Lewis '23, Dorothy Turner Alger 
'23, Amy Hull two-year '23, Emily 
Smith '25, Hazel Logan Loring 0**26, 
Helen Cooke ex'26, and Margaret Green- 
leaf ex'27. 

M 

On Sunday afternoon the S.C.S. gave 
a tea in the Abbey living-room to the 
two year freshmen girls. The color scheme 
was green and orange. Miss Skinner and 
Miss Hamlin were the faculty guests and 
the speaker of the afternoon was Barbara 
Knox, two year '26. 



NORTHAMPTON 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

Week of Nov. 2 
PAUL HANSELL PRESENTS 

The Northampton Repertory Company 

— IN 

Henri Bernstein's Powerful Plav 

k THB THIEF" 

MUtCBDU) in 
"THE CONSTANT LOVER" 

By St. John llankln 
KveniiiKs at K.I.", Bat. M.et. at 2.1.') 
Prices: Si 10. 85c. 60c. (including tax) 

NSSI Week TIIK IX)VER ROAD" 

by A. A. Milne 

S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

i PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight; 

Oculists Prescript ion* Filled. Broken lenm 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable makes 



COLLEGE SHOES 

— AT — 

TOWN PRICES 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



WE ARE READY FOR THE 

HUNTI NG SEASON! 

Also, all kinds of Rubber Footwear 

always carried In stock. 

HOSIERY a Specialty 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUNS1NGWEAR and MEDALIA 
SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $U9 $1.75 

G. Edward Fisher 
Wrought Iron 

Candlesticks, Bowls, Etc. 

ARE 

Attractive and Unbreakable 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 

275 High St Holyoke 

s h oe S 

— AND— 

HOSIERY 

of Quality and Fashion for 
M. A. C. Students 

Harry B. Herman, 1920 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Wait 

NEW PRICES 

Men's Whole Soles. Rubber Heels - - • *}•» 

Men'i Half Soles. Rubber Heels - • • l» 

Men's Rubber Soles, Rubber Heels - • * » 

Mens Half Soles 1M 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOUSE 
Open till 8 P. M. 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

You can buy the Remington Portable 
and Corona Typewriters 

ON EASY PAYMENTS IF YOU WISH 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



You will find an excel la nt 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP ... 
equipped with the moat up-to-date Goodyear 
Machinery and a modern 
• SHOE SHINING PARLOR 
at Hi Amlty-St.. - Labrovlu Block 

We understand your requirements and are pre- 
pared to meet your needs. 
All u-ork guaranteed. Shoes shined and dyed. 

VINCENT GRANDONICO. Prop. 



TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 8325 



FIGHTING AGATES 

(Continued from Pafte I) 



"The Old Order Changeth— " 

During the last year several Aggie 
traditions of long standing have either 
been discarded entirely or radically 
changed. Field parties have been sub- 
stituted for pond parties, — an innovation 
completely successful as to the entertain- 
ment afforded to the spectators, but some 
what less successful in its effect upon the 
refractory I'rosh. However, the effect of 
an innovation such as this may not be 
fairly judged by the initial attempt to 
put it in practice. 

A somewhat less drastic change is the 
postponement of Razoo Night and the 
Nightshirt Parade. This function is now 
scheduled to come during the seconel 
month of the first term, the intent ion 
being to avoid the confusion of opening 
week, and also the elimination of inter- 
ference with fraternity rushing. There 
has been a certain amount of adverse 
campus comment as to the advisibility of 



le, Smith 
qb, Gustafson 
rhb, Moberg 
Ihb, Sullivan 
fb, Hilyard 
2 3 4 Ttl. 
7 0—27 
3, Cadigan. 
touchdowns — 



Graves, re 
Wilder, qb 
Merrill, Ihb 
Mohardt, rhb 
Cadigan, fb 

Score by periods 1 

Amherst 14 

Touchdowns — Mohardt 
Points J>om try after 
Cadigan 3. Referee— James Keegan, 
Pittsfield Boys' Club. Umpire— Fred 
Peterson, Colgate. Head linesman — J. 
R. Whalen, Springfield. Time — 16 minute 
periods. Substitutions: M.A.C. — Cook 
for Smith, Black for Tulcnko, Marx for 
Amstein, Richardson for Moberg, Smith 
for Cook, Haertl for Smith. Amherst- 
Walker for Graves. Miller for Higgins, 
Whitney for Richardson, Smith for Pratt, 
Shankwiler for Nelson, McBride for 
Morse, Moore for Wilder, Creedon for 
Mohardt, Drew for Merrill, Pike for 
Miller, Richardson for Whitney, Baldwin 
for Smith, Nelson for Shankwiler, Morse 
for McBride, Wilder for Moore, Priddy 
for Creedon, Mohardt for Drew, Merrill 
for Cadigan, Higgins for Pike, Whitney 

for Richardson, Harper for Nelson. 

Craves lor Morse, W. Parker for Priddy. 



Farmers in Fiction 

1. In books he appears, 

Falsely drawn, 
The farmer who says 
'Now I swan." 

2. Also the farmer 

Still more dumb, 
Who "chaws tobaccy" 
And says "I vum." 

4. And dead as a dodo 
Is the one 
Whose epithet is 
"Wal, by gum." 

3. Only in books 

Does he appear 
Wearing a straw 
Behind his ear. 

5. The real-life farmer, 
Let us state, 
Is oft a college 
Graduate! 

CP 

And that's that! 



FRESHMEN SOPHOMORES JUNIORS SENIORS ATHLETES 

Do You Know? 
"HOW TO STUDY" 

The Students' Hand -Boole of Practical Hints on the Technique of 

Effective Study 
by WILLIAM ALLAN BROOKS 
A GUIDE containing hundreds of practical hints and short cuts in the 
economy of learning, to assist students in securing MAXIMUM SCHOLASTIC 
RESULTS at a minimum cost of time, energy, and fatigue. 

ESPECIALLY RECOMMENDED for overworked students and athletes 
engaged in extra cuniculum activities and for average and honor students who 
are working for high scholastic achievement. 

Some of the Topics covered 

Shortcuts In Effective 



ill for Examinations. 
Good Examinations. 



Scientific 

Study. 
Preparin 
Writing — 
Brain and Digestion In Relation 

to Study. 
How to Take Lecture and Reading 

Notes. 
Advantages and Disadvantages of 

Cramming. 



Diet During Athletic Training. 
How to Study Modern Languages. 
How to Study Science, Literature, 

etc. 
Why Go to CoUege? 
After College, What? 
Developing Concentration and 

Efficiency. 
The Athlete and His Studies, 
etc., etc., etc., etc., etc., etc., 



'12 Howard A. Turner was married 
to Miss Veda B. Larson at Boston, Mass., 
Sept. 16. The bride is a graduate of the 
COllege of Letters and Science, University 
of Wisconsin, in the class of 1913, and has 
been employed by the Bureau of Agri- 
cultural Economics, United States De- 
partment of Agriculture. After Nov. 1st, 
Mr. and Mrs. Turner will reside at 2934 
Vista St.. N.E., Washington, where Mr. 
Turner is in the employ of the U.S.D.A 



Why You Need This Guide 

"It is safe to say that failure to guide and direct study is the weak point in 
the whole educational machine. Prof. G. M. Whipple, University ot Michigan. 

"The successful men in college do not seem to be very happy. Most of them, 
especially the athletes are overworked." Prof. H. S. Canby. Yale. 

"Misdirected labor, though honest and well intentioned may lead to naught. 
Among the most important things for the student to learn is how to study. With- 
out knowledge of this his labor may be largely in vain." Prof. G. F. Swain, M. I. T. 

"To students who have nevet learnt "How to Study, "work is very often a 
chastisement, a flagellation, and an insuperable obstacle to contentment." Prof. 
A lnglis, Harvard. 

"HOW TO STUDY" will show you how to avoid all misdirected effort. 

Get a good start and make this year a highly successful one by sending 
for this hand-l>ook and guide NOW. 

You Need This Intelligent Assistance 



CLIP' 
AND MAIL 

TODAY 



for 



American Student Puldishets. 
22 West 43rd St. New YorV. 

Gentlemen: 

Please send me a ropy of "How to Study' 
which I enclose $1.00 cash. $1.10 check. 

Name 

Address 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. NOV. 4. 1°?5 



* 



HICKEY-FREEMAN SUITS 



The longer you wear them 



The more you admire them 



For the better things—Consult "Tom" 



The Best in Druft Store Merchandise 
The Best In Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

Tfio $&xaM, Star* 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



TheSlickestCoatontheCampus! 

•»«« v S»*» o** ^* 

vKoM 

No well dressed college man is 
without one. It's the original, 
correct slicker and there's noth- 
ing as smart or sensible for 
rough weather and chilly days. 

Made of famous yellow water- 
proof oiled fabric. Has all* 
round strap on collar and elas- 
tic at wrist-bands. 

Clasp-closing style 

Button-closing style 

Stamp the correct name in your 
memory, and buy no other. 
The "Standard Student" is 
made only by the Standard 
Oiled Clothing Co., N. Y. C 

Slip on* on 

ALL GOOD DEALERS 





Mr. John J, Helyai "i Brattleboro, \ t., 
who has been .i|i|>e,iine,l Extension Pro- 
oj eii Agrononr) at M.A.i to su< i .-«-.! 
Pro fe ssor John B, \i>le>u «.■> graduated 
Irom the University e>i Vermont in 1909, 
from which mstitution he also l>a> tlw 
degree <ii Mattel <>t Science, lie' served 
a* instructor in AsjroeKMt) .it tin- Univ. 
h! Vermont from 1900 te> 1912. Prom 
1012 te> 1920 he' was associated with 
Rutgers (olle-ne 1 .aid the New Jersej 
Agricultural Eaperlmeal Station, lie 
has had a wide- experience .is farm maaagei 
.mel siiuc 1983 has Ih'ch employed .«> 
County Afent in Windham County, \t. 

Mr. Ihlyar is expected tei unik-rtakt- hi> 

duties at M..\.( . about the middle e)t 
November. 



The first faculty elaiue e>! the' seasOfl 
will be held in Memorial Hall on Friday, 
November 0th, at 7.4o p. m. 



WANTED: A mm between the age of 39 ami 3f> to 
represent us in Northampton to take the place of U.K. 
Kobbins, a former teacher at M.A.C, whom we recently 
promoted to manager in eastern Connecticut. Several 
teachers whom we have hiretl in the 'past two or three 
years have been very successful with us. Unusual oppor- 
tunity for the ri£ht man. 

HARRY E. BARLOW. Manager 

Connecticut CeneraljLife Ins. Co. 
387 Main St. 

Springfield, Mass. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 




In an isolated region, almost inaccessible 
in winter, this 6500 h.p. hydro-electric 
plant located on the Deerfield River in New 
England, starts, protects, and stops itself. 



A Self Starting Power Plant 




The General EK rtric Company 
has developed generating an 1 
transmitting equipment stt _> 
by step with the demand for 
electric power. Alreadyelectric- 
ity at 220,000 volts is trans- 
mitted over a distance of 270 
miles. And G-E engineers, ever 
looking forward, are now 
experimenting with voltages 
exceeding a million. 

A new series of G-E advertise- 
ments showing what electricity 
is doing in many fields will be 
sent on request. Ask for 
booklet GEK-1. 



Dawn — the slumbering city awakens and calls for 
electric current. Many miles away the call is 
answered. A penstock opens automatically, releas- 
ing impounded waters; a water turbine goes to 
work, driving a generator; and electric current is 
soon flowing through wires over the many miles to 
the city. This plant starts and runs itself. 

Power plants with automatic control are now 
installed on isolated mountain streams. Starting 
and stopping, generating to a set capacity, shut- 
ting down for hot bearings and windings, gauging 
available water supply, they run themselves with 
uncanny precision. 

Thus another milestone has been reached in the 
generation of electric power. And with present-day 
achievements in power transmission, electricity 
generated anywhere may be applied everywhere. 

The non-technical graduate need not know where 
electricity comes from— nor even how it works. 
But he should know what electricity can do for 
him no matter what vocation he selects. 



3 10l,M 



GENERAL ELECTRIC 



GENERAL 



F1FCTP ir 



COMPANY 



SCHENECTADY 



NEW 



YORK 



Everything 

the new 
student needs 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

IN THE M BUILDING 



Paper Supplies 
Stationery 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mass 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guarantied 

REPAIRING AND AM. KINDS OP 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite Post Office 



COLD WEATHER NEEDS... 

The old NORTH WIND is beginning to blow across the CAMPUS now. There is no time like the present to get fixed 
for your cold weather needs. 



Amherst 



CARL H. BOLTER 



Hyunnis 



I Town Hall, Amherst 

bt — * I* tevwirilln: 



Wed. 
Thurs. 

iiiul 

Friday 

3.00. 

til's. 
S..?<) 



K-iiftiiii«-iiu'i>l Kxlraortllnary ! 

TIIKr.K DAYS 

Two Show* ni Niftht. 

M.illiHfs at Mils* the 

benvftl of the School 

Children 

||\|«M.!> LLOYD »" 
•IIIK IRISHMAN" 

liis latest ;><>« greatest pic- 
ture. Tli»n-'.s mora than 
laughter i" Is- There BM 
r,. ira «'f )'•• ""• * reams ol 
delight! iind speed mm sue* 
pen to iiiul dram*. 

N) „ , I al>L > 

PRICES: 

Matinees I w i.in 

( hlldrt d, 2 c I i»<t, Me 
Uulu, 50c Hal. Me 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NO V. 4, 1925 

YE AGGIE INN 

OPERATED BY THE STUDENTS 



, OPEKA'l \\) Hi iiii'>.Miwn.M.i (QUALITY) 
Nat^al Note Books, Stationery. Parker, Waterman. Conklin, ChlUon fountain pens, Toilet articles. 
National Mote Everytnjnft the 8tu dent needs for the class-room or his person. 
V ,!. Doolittie '26 r'b. Sawyer "26 R- H. White '26 R. Hintze » V. T ' fft » 



Saturday 

3.00, 6 .45 

s. to 












Mon. 

3.00, (.49 
P..U) 



Thon 

lulu, Hoyt, Victor 

^THE MAN WHO FOUND 

HIMKEI I " 
by Booth TarfcJngtoa 

t s tU.tnetly 

Ui be Daniel* «»d " Brrieon 

"^LOVERS IN 01 IRAN- 
TINE'' 
One Of the funntet t tilings 
ever put »" the screen, 
from .lie hits Broaawsi int. 
•'Ouarnnilne". 
I Patha Review Comedy 



ALUMNI 

'77 Mr. James K. MWe km found 
dead i" bis studio on Sunday morning, 
November let, as a result pi an attat k 
ol hearl failure. Mr. Mill- was active in 
theaffaira ol hi* clans al M.A.C. and was 
a member of the D.G.K bich 

i now the I fraternity. 

M , . Mi nown photogra 

i bis death is keenly 
i, I, I , knew him. 

Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

Wfl carry tk* b*t1 in everything 



FIVE HOUSES 

Continued from Huge 1) 

festivitiesai theUmbdaChi House which 
engaged the Hollywood orchestra "f 
Springfield, for the occaaion. Mr*. ( ■>"' 
g/ai il>'- chaperone for the Mi. Holyoke 
and Mr. and Mrs. Richmond repre- 
lented this college. "Al" Bias catered 
h, addition to the Hallowe'en decorations, 
lightful effect wa \ reduced !>:■ light- 
ing in ilu fraternitj colors, 
Twent) three couple, and numerous 
■ attended the dance at 1 beta < h 
fraternity. The chaperona were Mra. 
Roadhouae from Mt, Holyoke, and Mr. 
and Mr.. Phillip*, from M.A.C. Dinner 
was served al Draper Hall, and the rouak 
ma* furniaht -1 by Walter Bra) 'a orchestra. 



BQSTQNIHNS 

.-. Correct in College Style .-. 

A SHOE THAT LASTS 

and STYLE THAT STAYS 



SMALL ATTENDANCE 

t ..ntinued from page 1) 

greeted with aupmime la the eourat ol 
his speech, Prof. Hicks mad.- some verj 
pointed obaervatkisui concerning college 

spirit and the small number of students 

who wane present at the earn* meeting. 
Aside from the fart thai only about one 
third of the studeol body waa present, 
the affair waa a success in every way. 




7/7 doUTS DC?* 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 

AMHERST 



MAIN STREET 



CAVALRY BARN 

TO BE REPLACED 

The Governor and Council have made 

en appropriation from the emergency 

fund for the replacement of the cavalrv 
barn at MAC. The bam will be rebuilt 

on approximately the same location as 
the former structure. It will l>e construc- 
ted of concrete block*, aad will be built 

in two sections, one for the shelter ol the 

horse*, and one lor the storage of the 

forage. Work will l>c c ommen ced al once. 




or Men who Demand Style— 

You will find nothing more satisfac- 
tory than one of our new Fall suits 
that we have just unpacked. The 
price you will find reasonable as is true 
of everything that we sell. 

Winter Overcoats are also ready. Pick 
yours out now while the assortment 
is at its best. 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 



b. 



Big Records with Corn Gluten Feed 

The sensation of the Three Big Dairy Shows 
of IQ2 5 was the great herd of ioo grade cows— 
the pick of 200 herds in 1 1 States. Every one of 
them was fed Corn Gluten Feed. 

Successful dairymen in 38 States are feeding 
Corn Gluten Feed because it supplies protein in 
its safest and most easily convertible form. 

The famous cattle feeding experiment at Odcbolt, Iowa, 
23 years ae;o. resulted in a victory for Corn Gluten Feed 
as the protein feed that pays a profit. 

Corn Gluten Feed in the Poultry Mash is helping to 
make bigger cur records. Sheep feeders are making cheaper 
gains with this pure corn product as their protein supply. 

The consumption of Corn Gluten Feed is more than 
600.000 tons per war. It is the best feeding part of corn 
A single ton contains the protein of nearly three tons of 
whole giain. 

Corn Gluten Feed in your own feeding tests. 1 1 will 
help you to make new records for your institution. That 
will help the feeders of your State to earn larger profits. 

Let us put ypu on our mailing list for the new bulletins 
issued by this Bureau. They will help you in your class 
work. Write us today. 

Associated Corn Products Manufacturers 

Feed Research Bureau 

Hugh G. Van Pelt. Director 

208 South La Salle St., Chicago, III. 




16 



BH F^^ Q^ iC£ 



30E 



E3EG 



SEE 



IS AT 



F. M. Thompson & Son 



DRURY'S 



College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



[ 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

The Latest Dances and Songs on 
Y I C T OR RECORD S 
Assure y 11 of pleasant times. New Records on sale every Friday 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 




JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLRR 



AMHERST 



MASS. 



TALES YOUR LETTERS TELL 

F-iron Crane & Pike Co. makers of the famous Crane's 

linen Lawn and Eaton's Highland Linen 
have designated the weak of November 2nd to 7th, 1925 as National 
Graphology week. 

. " , . _ , %f ..ri.inrt ivmor in :tny qualify manufactured by them if 

I „.ry purer. ■•.scr M.f j i h. .* of »rU \n& papy ij ^ ^ - , iimint t . n . 

purchased during the WteK "' ;°^ mt , mb ,. r Kth your character «ill be read by your 
semlinft in this coupon before NflTOH" r y , r „i,I„l 

handwriting, • "" '■ • i " K 



VERY — 
MEAL 

WRIGUYS 

makes your food do you 
more good. 

Note how it relieves 
that stuffy feeling 
after hearty eating. 

Sweetens the 
breath, removes 
food particles 
from, the teeth, 
gives new vigor 
to tired nerves. 

Comes to you 
fresh, clean and 
full-flavored* 



Your Prof, will Confirm This: 

The ingredients of a good dairy ration, contain- 
ing So^o of 

Buffalo Com Gluten Feed 

30% of Bran, 20% of Ground Oats and 15% of 
Oilmeal, can be bought and mixed by the dairy- 
man at a very low cost per ton. Fed in the regular 
way to good grade Holsteins or other cows, a 
ton of such a ration will produce 3 tons of milk, 
which at $2 per cwt. amounts to $120; at $3 per 
cwt. $180. 

This is economical feeding. It is possible because 
Buffalo, the milk-producing part of the ration, 
is low in cost but high in protein and total di- 





gestible nutrients. That's why 
Buffalo will always be a part of 

EVERY LIVE DEALER'S STOCK 

AND 
EVERY GOOD DAIRY RATION 

Corn Products Refining Co. 

New YorR CHicago 

Also Manufacturers 
Diamond Corn Gluten Meat 



Prot»" 




*&} 



•Hit 



tmv. 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 

ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST k DEACON. Pr°P\ 




Evening Clothes of Merit — , A . . ( r ^» 

When it c?mes to dinner suits the man who knows he is correctly attired is always at ease. Correctly cut, expertly tailored and styled for s 
these suits represent the utmost in value ranging from $40.00 to $65.00. Dress accessories for every occasion. • • • • 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



S^g jMaagariiitfipttfi 



1 

Agricultural 



Vol. XXXVI. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, NOV. 11, 1925 




No. 7 



CLASSES DIVIDE 
HONORS IN SCRAP 

Sophomores Win Nightshirt Parade, 
but Freshmen are Victorious in 
Boxing and Wrestling Bouts. 



Rasoo Ni^ht and the Nightshirt Parade, 

which in previous \c.irs have U-en OS) the 

program for the first week of the college 
year, took place for the dr.st time trader 
the new order of things <>n last Fridaj 

i. Neither the sophomores nor the 

freshmen wen- able to claim a complete 
victory, 'or while the tn>*h champions 
captured five ol the boaiag and wrestling 

bouts, a- against the sophs' two. in the 

battle of nightshirts which ensued, the 
second vaar men scored tluir initial 
triumph OVOf their rivals, piling up !">! 

points against 41 for the froah. 
The bouta opened auspiciously tor the 
bomorea, when Baumgartnei threw 

Kiii!i|uist .iliir four minutes ot wrestling, 
in which the contestants appeared to be 

mix evenly matched; but Gagtiaducci 
evened things up by gaining a fall in the 
la-t few seconds of his five minute bout 
with Fox. In the first of the boxing bouts, 

Tuttle of the sophomores and Blaisdetl of 

the freshman staged the closest battle ,>i 
tin evening, but although general opinion 

*ai divided, the judges' decision went to 
Biakdell. The froah increased their 
ssafgifl to o" — 1 in the next bout, in which 
Clements scored a comparatively easy 

victory over Wih ox, although the content 

went the full three rounds. The hopes 
ol 1928's supporters were again raised, 
when, in the third boxittg bout. ( apone 
Meowed himself too clever for Race, aad 
MM awar de d the Ixiut at the entl of two 
rounds; hut they were dashed when 
\.irt.inio threw Agaasbar in the final 
wrestling match. In the last bout of the 
eveaiag, Walkdea made it — 2 in favor 
of tht freshmen hy literally smothering 
Calvin, the bout being st o pped in the 

(Continued on Page 3) 



TUFTS INFORMAL 



Programs and tickets may be 

procured from members of the 
committee. The dance will In- 
humed tO M\ty couples. 



Tax $.1.50 



Stags $2.00 



SOPHOMORES HOLD 
FIRST CLASS SMOKER 



"•Dean" Burns Recei\os Much Ap- 
plause for Entertainment at l«>2.s 
Frolic. 



R. I. Defeats 

Aggie Judgers 

Norcross and Smiley Highest M.A.C. 
Men at N. E. Fruit Show. 



Rhode Island defeated M.A.C. for the 
first time in many years in the annual 
Student fruit judging and packing contests 
held in connection with the New England 
Fruit Show in Boston, October M to 

November 1. The M.A.C team, coached 

by I'rof. Brooks I). Drain, came in as a 
\er\ close second. The Rhode Island 
team was coached by II. Y. Marsh, a 
M emb er of the class of '1">. Roy K. 
Norcross and Ray <■. Smiley were tied 
for the second individual honors. 

\\ ith one or two exceptions, ever) mem- 
ber of the departments of Pomology and 
Horticultural Manufactures a t ten d ed the 
rruit Show. Ine very department, the 
show was without doubt the finest ever 
held in New England. Cash prizes 
approximating $">(XX) and special prizes to 
'lit amount of .?2<K)() more, attracted an 
fxhihit of fruit, second to none. Professor 
Fred C. Sears acted as chairman of the 
executive committee and IYofcs>or Win. 
». I ole as i hah wail of the exhibit com- 
mit! i 

In addition to competitive entries, the 
College Educational Exhibit a ttr ac t ed 
considerable attention and favorable com- 
ment. Sores of interviews with fruit 
powers were held by those in attendance 
at i he exhibit and over 500 requests for 
bulletin information were rece i ve d . 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Thursday— 

"> p. m. Assembly. Student 
Format. 
Friday — 
World Aggie Night. 

Two Year Football. Connecticut 

Aggie freshmen at StorrO. 
Saturday — 
Varsity Football. M.A.C. vs. Lowell 
I extile at Alumni Field. 
Sunday — 

m. Sunday Chapel. Speaker, 
Rev. John B. Manna. M.A.C. 
Monday — 
\ Brsil y doss country. New England 
Intercollegiates at Boston. 



The tii>t daas moker held !>> the class 
oi 1928, took place last Wednesday ni^ht, 
in the Social Union Room. North College, 
with a large majoritj of the class present. 
President "Bud" Blomquist presided, and 
introduced the speakers, ol whom the lirsi 
was Dean Burns. After a length) address 
on nothing in particular, be waa induced 
to ni\c an exhibition of his skill as an 
nest he tk dancer, and his efforts were 
wildly applauded. He waa followed b) 
Prof. Grose of the Foreatr) Depart men t, 

who gave a brief talk on the future of the 

lumber business in New England, intei 
apersing his address with several "tall 
stories" from the Western lumber camps, 
concerning the pro we es of the mythical 
Paul Bunion. At the conclusion of hi* 
speech he was heartil) cheered, •>> waa 

also "Top" (lark, who concluded the 
speaking program with a short talk on 
the subject ol college tradition. 

Next on the program tame several 

musical numbers, which were all very 
well received, and ■ dramatic reading l»> 
"Charley" Charleston. Just before the 

meeti ng broke up, ■ plea w.i* made for 

volunteers to enter the boxing and 

wrestling bouts against the freshmen, 
,md quite a large number expressed their 
willingness to t.ike part. 

The final, and most excttiag feature ol 

the evening occurred when the ke^ of 
Cider was tapped, for a near riot cn-md 
as the thirsty sophomores Strove to fill 
their cups, and a great loss of life was 
narrowly averted. However, "a mi-» is 
as K<>od as ,i mile", and e v er y body went 

home happy. 



Sophomore Co-Eds to 

Have Own "Smoker" 



Girls to Have Portion of Class Smoker 
Money for Party of Their Own. 



At a recent meeting of the class the 
sophomores voted that five of the thirty 
dollars which is the amount set aside for 
class smokers be given to women members 
of the class. It was d eci ded , since the 
girls had also contributed to the smoker 
fund yet take no part in the smokers, 
that they l>e allowed money to hold a 
party of their own. The girls form more 
than one-si xthof the whole (lass and were 

therefore apportioned to one-sixth ot the 
money in the fund. 

The senior girls have also asked for a 
part of the (lass smoker fund. Although 
most of the members of the class thought 
when it was p r esent ed that this was a 
gtKjd idea, nothing has. as yet, been done 
about it. 



TWO FRATERNITIES 

HAVE HOUSE DANCES 



Sigma Phi Epsilon and Alpha Sigma 
Phi Celebrate Week-end. 



Sigma Phi Epsilon and Alpha Sigma 

Phi fraternities held house dances last 
Saturday afternoon, November 7th. The 
dance at Sigma Phi Epsilon was attended 
by twenty couples and about fifteen stags. 
President and Mrs. \i. If. Lewis were the 
local chaperons, while Miss Stinchlield 
represented Mt. Holyoke College. Moon 
Mullin's Melodious Mask Makers fur- 
nished the music, and Al Bias was engaged 

.is caterer. The house was artistically 
decorated with palms, evergreens, oak 

boughs and streamers in the fraternity 

colors. 

Twenty-two couples were present at 
the Alpha Sigma Phi house dance. The 
local chaperons were Mr. and Mrs. A. 
W. Phillips, and Miss Blanche E. Brother- 
ton was the chaperone from Mt. Holyoke. 
Harry Till of Amherst, catered, and the 
music was turnished b) Morgan's Collegi- 
ans of Springfield. The house was decora- 
ted in the fraternity colora. 



World Aggie Night 

Program Arranged 

Members of Amherst District will 
Meet in Memorial Building. Radii* 
Program from WBZ 



The meeting ol M.A.C. alumni in the 

Amherst district on World Aggie Night 
will be held in the Memorial Building 

from s to 11 p. m. There has been > 
considerable change in this year's pro- 
gram ovej that ol previous years which 
have been chiefly stag affairs. A wide 
and varied program has been .iii.ingcd. 
and the wives ol alumni and women 
graduates as well as the men are urged 
to be present. Invitiatkms have also 

been tent to all members ot I In faculty. 

There will be a radio with loud speaker 
set up in the hall so that the World A 
Night program broadcasted from station 
WBZ in Springfield can be received. 
Dancing, card playing, and bowling will 
furnish entertainment before the radio 

program begins, and a bullet lunch will 

be served from 9.30 to 10. There will 
be no dull momenta during the evening 
ami it is hoped that a large attendance 
will Ik- present to enjo) the evening. 

The radio program which will be broad 

casted from station WBZ is as follows: 
l. Alumni Quartette Durelle Swan 'hi, 

William C. Sanctuary '1-', L. bV 

Arlington '23, F . B. Gustin, special, 

.1 On the Field D. P. Miller 'PS 

I. Farewell lo Aggie I . D. Criggs ' l.'i 
I Miss. Aggie, Here's to t lice W. 

W. Thayer '13 

_'. Faculty Frio Dr. William II. Davis, 

clarinet; Prof. Frank A. Waugh, Bute; 

Mrs. Edna lx Watts, pi, mo. 

3. Talk by Acting Preskkat Edward M. 

Lewis. 

4. Roy K. Patch '\'-i tenor SOtOB, 
a I Mary of Argvle 

b) A Dream 
o. Student Ouarlette -Herbert J. Harris 
(Continued on PaSe 4) 



Modern Church is 

Not Dying Out 



Dr. Gilkey Believes more Churches are 
Gaining than are Losing. 



"Is the modem church dying out?" 
This was the ipieslion asked by Rev. 

James Gordon Gilkey, pastor of the 

Snith Congregational I hurt h of Spring- 
field, who was the preacher at chapel 
last Sunday. He admitted that there are 
sonic churches which are dying, and said 
that many young people are turning away 
from the church because they believe that 
all churches are like these lew. The 
preacher slated that, on the contrary, 
there are many more churches which are 
going forward, and are working for "(lie 
united Church of the future." The pur- 
pose of these churches, and of the men 
who lead them, according to Rev. Mr. 
Gilkey, is threefold; to try to help think- 
ing people to find an intelligent faith in 
< .od; to stand behind any intelligent plan 
for universal peace; and lastly, to try to 
mold the characters of those of the 
coining generation into a likeness ol that 
of Christ. 



"M" BUILDING HAS THE 

BETTER ARCHITECTURE 



Landscape Gardening Debate Decides 
Against Old Chapel. 



A novel assignment in Landscape 
Gardening 76 last Monday was ■ debate 

on the q uesti o n : Resolved that the Old 
Chapel is a more satisfactory example of 
architecture than the Memorial Building. 
The affirmative was sup port e d by T. J. 

Gram '88 and II. E. Fraaer '-'ii. The 

winning team, which upheld the negative 

side of the question, consisted of W. T, 

Stopford '28, and Miss Margaret Smith 
'2<i. The judges were: Acting President 
!•:. M. Lewis, Mr. Charles R. Green, of 
the Jones library, and Prof. Charms H. 

Patterson. 



MASS MEETING 

There will be a mass meeting Friday 

nighi, November -'it, the day before the 

Tufts game. Everyone save the dale. 
This should be one of the Inst mass 
meetings that M.A.C. has had lor a long 
time. 



THREE MORE GAMES 

ON GRID SCHEDULE 

Lowell Textile School Next Opponent 
of Maroon and White. 

M.A.C, faces three more teams on the 
gridiron this tail. Lowell Textile School 

and TuftS aie due lo come lo Minimi 
Field ai\<\ the Agates join nev lo Spring 
field on Thanksgiving Day. 

The next opponent is Lowell IcMile 
School. Lowell has li.id a poot season as 

i u as wins is concerned, but the records 

do not indicate their exact strength for 

Saturday's game. Lowell has won onl) 
one game this I. ill. The) beat St. Michaels 
12 to l) early in the season. Bales, whom 
the Agates shin out 19 to 0, downed the 
Millnieii is to it. Norwich was beaten by 
M.A.C. P.' to ii, bin the soldiers defeated 
Lowell il' lo 0. I he Wore* iter I ach 
Lowell Textile game last Saturday, the ob- 
jective tussle ol both institutions, resulted 
in a 15 to 7 aria for Worcester. However, 
I owell's present strength is not as meagre 
.is these figures indicate. The school's 
iiest difficulty has itceii the fact t li.it 
there was little time for practice. Hut for 
two weeks Coach Cawley has been able 
to give ln^ squad longei sessions. In 
addition, the squad has hit uased materi- 
ally in sine so that at i he pr es e n t time 
forty men are reporting regularly. Fw<> 
whole teams are now available for outside 

games and a midget or a heav v bat kfield 
may be used si .iiiv time. 

The next game on the M.A.C. schedule 
is Tufts, one of I he teams which prizes 
a win over the Agates more than ovei 
any ot its other opponents, lulls, too, 
has not faired well in winning games this 

fall, losing to Norwich, Connecticut, New 

Hampshire, and Middlebury. lulls de 
baled Maine, now the Line Free Stan 
champion, 7 lo 6, in an early season 
meeting. They held Connecticut S COTcm os 
lor three per i od s and were beaten by a 

single field goal. New Hampshire, one of 

the unbeaten elevens so far this yen, 
won by the same margin. Coach "Eddie" 
Caarj n.\» a light but scrappy team. Tk* 
lineup includes live veterans and only 
one sophomore, Bowker who plays on the 
end of the line. Captain (ieorge I'crry 
pilots the aggregation; Hal McDonnell 
plays halfback and does the punting and 
(Continued on Pag> 2) 



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ANNOUNCEMENT 



Two Is together mean I he 
IF Club. I he power of the 
two T's is invisible but it is 
being felt all over. For the 
benefit of the unfortunate out 
sider who wants to know what 
it is all about we will make 

the following official announce- 
ment — 

"IT means Taciturn." 



TT TT TT .,.,. T| . ,.,. TT .,..,. 



IT 
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CLASS BASKETBALL 

TO START SOON 



Inter-class basketball will soon bl- 
under way, t he lust games being scheduled 

for Tuesday, November L'J. All BOO 
varsity players will be eligible lo repre 

sent their re sp ective (lasses. I be schedule 

drawn up by Coach Tumcy follows: 
Nov. 24 '28 vs 'lis and '27 vs '29 
I let . I — '28 vs UYr. and 'L'H vs '27 
Dec. 1 '29 vs2Vr. and '27 vs '28 
De 8— '28 vs '2'.) and '27 vs 2Vr. 

Dec. il '29 vs '28 and '28 vs 2Vr. 



SHORT COURSE OFFICE 

GETS MOVIE MACHINE 



Will be Available to all Departments 
of College. 



The short (ours, Office has recently 

,r quired a moving picture machine for 

home and ckUM UBC and it is liojxd that 

all departments of the college will find 

OCCaaion tO make use ol it lor their pub 

licity work. The projecting camera can 
1m- readily used by connecting with an 
ordinary electric light socket and ha 
non-inflammable film. Tims the machine 

can be used with p erf e c t safety by an 
inexperienced operator and it will In- 
found an effective method for recording 

college and (lass activities on the screen. 



HARRIERS WIN 
LAST DUAL MEE1 



Team Work Clinches Race after 
B. V. gets First Two Places. 

The Aggie etnas, eountr) team cum 
through with a vk uhv in their final dual 

meet ol the si.i„,n when they nosed out 

i he B, I . terriers l>v a sore of 28 to -'12 
ovei the Franklin Park eottras laet 
s.iiiudav morning. Two It. U. men 
finished lusi, but Biroa -n\<\ Swag were 
clone on the heels ,,i the second, and 
three othei M.A.c. harrier*, Crooka, 
Nottebaert, and Wheeler followed them 
to clinch the race foi Vggie I he men 
finished in the following order: While 

(B.U.), Lockhan (B.U.), Birou fM), 

Swan (Mi, (rooks (\L. Noiiebaert (Ml, 
Wheel,-, (XL, Ku, sell i B.I . (alien 

'ILL >, Bartlett (M), Preston (M . 

Hi ihiev B.C.), Chase (If. I'.l, Dowling 

( B.U. I. Time, •'<(> minutes, I | nd- 



FR0SH LOSE FINAL 

CONTEST OF SEASON 



Deei field Academy Trounces Neo- 
phytes by 47 — Score. 



"Ed" Tumey's freshman feotbati team 

concluded their season with a game at 
Deertield last Friday when ihev s uffe red 
a 17 to I) lacing at the hands of Deei Inld 

Academy. Barge was the high i>oint 

getter for the winners, scoring 21 of his 
team's points. Tk* freshman line did 
well, but the backfield, weakened bv I he 
loss ot several men by Inj uries and in- 
eligibility, was unable to show much 
punch. Mills and Cox fealiircd the game 
for the losers. • 



Drury High Defeats 

Shorthorn Eleven 



Two Years Beaten for First Time 
This Season, 



The Two Year eleven received its first 
setback of the season at the hands of the 
strong Drury High out fit at North Adams 
last Saturday. Long runs by E. Sully 
and I'rimuierof Drury featured I he game, 
although Tribe, Burrill, and Johnson of 
the Short hoi lis played a good game, and 
Truelson's kicking was ex, client. 



MELLEN RESIGNS 

Richard Mellen, Jr. '21, held agent at 
M.A.C, and secretary of tk* Alumni 
Association has .ucepied a position as 

Boy ScoWt executive at Arlington, Mass. 
lie will resign from his position here on 
December 1st. Mr. Mellen is a graduate 
ol this college in the class ol IH2I, and 
since 1917 has been identified with local 
scout work. 



SOPHOMORES ATTEND 

PERFORMANCE OF "THE THIEF" 
The members of the sophomore class 

had the excellent opportunity of meeting 

the actors ol the Northampton Re|>ertory 

( ompaiiy when they attended the matiii'-e 
performance of Henri Bernstein's "The 

Thief" at the Academy of Music, last 
Saturday. Mia* Goeeeman, who arranged 
the party, ems prevent at the performance 
accompanied by her sister and Mrs. M. 
B. Marsh. Although fewer attended tk* 

party than were expected, yet the college 
was well represented in the fen that did 
attend. 

Between the acts the -Indents sang 
several of the Aggie songs which the n -I 

of the audience well appreciated. Alter 
the performance, Mr. Paul HanaeB, 

manager ol the company, took t he 
students behind the SCUMS and intro- 
duced I hem tO the acton who look part 
in the play. All were united in declaring 

that the play was excellent I) acted and 
that the party was ■ great sua ■ 



OPPONENTS' SCORES 



Amherst 16, Springfield 

New Hampshire 17, Conn. Aggie 3 

Middleburv 19, TlftsO 

W. P. I 18, Lowell Textile 7 






THK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. NOV. 11, 1925 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 11, 1925 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper oi the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. l'ubli>lie<l iverjf 
Wednesday by the students. 



IOAKD OF EDITORS 

Mary T. BoYli Editor-in-l l.ii-f 

Jqiin F. LAMiieur 'S6 Managing Editor 



DEPARTMENT BDITOBf 

Editorial M*«v T. Iiovn '2(3 

Cider Pre.. Mary T. Boyd 16 

Athleti.s William L. DOSS "H 

Harold L CLASS II 
Campus New. Raymoni. 1- ". Diflky '27 

llllWIIII IlARNARU '2K 
JOSKPHINB PANZICA '2H 

Co- Ed New. Frances C. Bruce "27 

Faculty News Ernest L. Spknckr '2S 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Alvin G. Stevens "26 Bu.ine.. Manager 

Edwin A. Wildek'28 Advertising Manager 

Lewis II. Whitaker '27 Circulation Manager 

John E. White "27 

Douclas W. Losing '28 

t ■ASUS F. CLASS '27 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
coiiics 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts COtXlGUW. 

In case of change <>f address, sub- 
scribers will pleas* notify tlie business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Fntcii-.l M HOOad-cteM inatli t at the Amherst 

Pott Office. Accepted tor mailing at speeialnite 
of pottage provided foi ia taction 1 103. Act of Oc- 
tober, 1917 authorised August SX>. nils. 



The Why Of 
"The Anonymous Agate*" 



"3600 yi. us ngo Aesop aiid": The onrj 
way to escape critfctam is to (Be. Any 
undergradttste editor will certify thai M 

Grade A truth and add that, consider 

tog the usual reception c4 bie words, be 
the) never so humbly, would-be-belpfullj , 

and cat-may iook-al-a-kingishly uttered, 
he doubts il even death will tit) the trick. 
Alumni, however, may put their heads 
beneath the ase and dive in with im- 
punity. (We know it. We mixed it pur- 
posely.) So we will let the alumni do the 
talking. The) -in some fourteen or fifteen 
letters recentl) received, wish to tell us: 

That our men Ottghl to wear numbers 

on their football jerseys. 

Thai the number system makes lor 
easy identification for the alumni and the 

iiitsitlcrs. 

That identification make- lor isx reased 

iterest, in thie day when personalities 

.,v -.. largi a pan in athletics. 

Thai strangers coming to our games 

(eel ou1 oi things, and al a great dis- 

ad\ 

And that « tc, etc. In abort, thai out 
men should wear numbers, and why don't 
they, and wh) doesn't tonne one do some- 
thing aboul it P 

The chief answer is: thai it's not the 

U1 ., thing tO dO. II it were, it would 

bavetx n done long since. That, knowing 

our athletic authorities, should be self- 
;. ni. However, there are two or three 
other things to be taken into consider 

at ion. 

Have Neu ever been to a game and 
read your program carefully, and noted 
the player's numbers, and announced 
confidently the identity of the man who 

just madl tti< brilliant pia\ "Yes W 

then that'* < ■'" n", only to have the 
,-h, , r i n j n let out a disconcertingly 

clea, yeiifoi Brown? Felt full of kindness 
end interest then, didn't you? Well tbere'i 
one reason "Why not". The Amhersl 
K<lI , particularly g< d i xampli 

() l" ,],, ,'. the numbei system. 

Anothei thing: numbers afford identifi- 
cation? Ves, too easy identification. The 
opposition can watch tin numbers, chart 
th< plays, at I y» i can I gure oul the 
for ■ 

And finally: "A rose by any other 
name would smell as sweet". Which 
being translated means that numben 



,ni Invited to end delegate - to the man 
on the iih. 5th, and 6th ol Decamher 

The meetings are tO be of two main 

eg; .1 iei i« s oi Round table discussioni 
m be led by Dr. Hen I >. Wood and I >r. 
| imes I larv* y Robinson; and sddn 

by such men as l'ivsi<h nt I rank J. 

Goodnow of Johns Hopkins University, 

and Dr. Alexander Meiklejohn. Dr. 
GoodnOW will fuithei develop his recent 

proposal thai college education terminate 

with the sophomore year, and that the 
Graduate schools then take over such 
students as are sincerely interested in 
higher education. Dr. Meiklejohn will 
Open the Parley with a critical analysis 
Of the American CoUegS, and develop his 
thesis for the collage of the future. 

Thfl idea of such a parky was first 
IHMHCitrd hy Woodrow Wilson, whose 
idea, as expressed when he was President 

of Princeton In 1900, was: "My plea is 

this: lhat we now deliberately set ourselves 
to make a home for the spirit of learning: 

that we re-orgaaise our coUegee on the 

linis of this simple conc e ption, that a 
college is not Ottly I body of studies but 
a mode ot aSBOl iation; that its courses ate 
only its formal side, it contacts and con 
tagtoni its realities. It must become I 

community of scholars and pupils,— a 

free community but a very real one, in 
whkh democracy may work its rca-on able 
triumphs of accommodation, its vital 
pi net aire <>i union. I am not suggesting 
that young men be dragooned into be- 
coming scholars or tempted to become 
pedants, or have ss) artificial compulsion 
whatever put upon them, but only that 

they lx- introduced into the hi^h society 
ol university idcaU, be exposed to the 
hazards of Stimulating friendships, be 

introduced into the easy camrsdeshipe oi 

the republic of letters. By this means the 
class-room itself might some day come to 

teem i part ot life." 

M.A.C. has been invited to stud dele 
Hates to this conference. Surely there 
will be several who will wish to avail 
themselves of this unusual and stimulating 
opportunity for intercollegiate discussion 

ot problems of vital importsnee to us. 
I here will l>e no fees, and all delegates 
will l>e entertained by Wesleysn Univer- 
sity. If any college groups or or g a nis a ti on 
is interested is the inability of sending 
a delegate to this Parley, the Coujkuam 
editors will be glad to give all possible 
information at their disposal. 



THEClB 



te&Jzi 




AT THE ABBEY 



NKW DISCUSSION 

CLUB ORGANIZED 



Sharp Ejected Temporary Chairman 
ol New Campus Organization. 



At ,w\ informal meeting recently held 
in the Social Union Rooms ■ group of 
students formulated plane for a new club, 

the purpose of winch is to be the -tinui- 

lattngol frank and open general discussion. 
Dallas L. Sharp was elected temporary 
chairman. The discussions are to deal 
with science, literal ure, sociology, and an) 

Other subject which the dub shall deem 

oi sufficient importance to warrant the 
time s|m nt in discussion. 

Meetings ot the club are to be held on 

Tuesday nights at 7 p. m. in Mr. I lamia's 
office in North College. All interested 
an cordialb invited to join. 



Civilization ! 

Two items in the daily pa|K-rs: "Chil- 
dren starve in Armenia" and "Babani 
perfumes now only *2 an ounce." 

CP 

Another Pollyinanity 
I'hrophylactic platitude disc ove r ed after 
reading advertisements for toothbrushes 
and the toothbrush's insidious playmate, 

and capable of being applied according 

to need and discretion: A clean truth 
never repays. 

CP 

Let's Go to College ! 

The latest toothsome morsel presented 
for our mental delectation by the speed 
inn stcreopt icons was "The Freshman". 
As humor, it may pass, but it's dangerous 
propaganda nevertheless, and you're going 
to have ■ hard time convincing your 

maiden aunt from Keokuk thai all 

assemblies are co-ed receptions, and that 
thr favorite amusement of upperclassmen 
is not the "kidding" .of the innocent 

Frosh, and that you hope to be choked il 

any one ever catches you Waving a college 

pennant on the end of a cute little sti. k. 

If thai picture showed a COUSga, what 

on earth are we attending:' For we, 

oci asionally, have to study. 

CP 

The 5-11 Club Again 

The "i -II Club tills such a fundamental 
need that it will never die. The latest 
member, proposed and unanimously voted 

m .,, the Nightshirt Parade, is especially 

worthy of the— er— distinction. 

CP 

Our Commerical Intelligentsia 

A wise man spends bis life in the search 
for truth. Comes a day (this is cinematic 
Circumlocution!) when he makes known to 
the public the fruits of his labor. And the 
public, as much as a doSCS of it. takes his 
truth and turns it to personal profit, 
while the rest of us say. "That doesn't 
mean anything in my JrOSng Me. bet's 
go to the movies!" 

Of the aforesaid dozen, eleven become 
teat hers of the new wisdom, and the 
twelfth man -well, for instance, the 
twelfth man advertises the new Fourth 
Dimensional furniture. 

The enterprising dealer himself explains 

it thus: "The fourth Dimension is Time. 

Well, an) time you want to mow. you 

just lake these things to pieces and set 
them up again i" ■ combination that 
suits the new location, and just see all 
the time >oii save." 

" \nd th. v shot men like Lincoln!" 
CP 



Invitations to the wedding of Kathleen 
Adams fx'2fi and Raymond MacAfee '21 
have been issued: the wadding will tab 
place November 98th. 

If 

The engagement of Rebecca Merrymaa 

two year '2.">, to Mr. James Hawley ol 
Wist Newbury, Vt., has been announced. 



COMMUNICATIONS 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCOKPOKA TED 

275 High St Holyoke 

s h oe S 

AM) 

HOSIERY 

of Quality and Fashion for 
M. A. C. Students 

Harry B. Herman, 1920 



The CoUSSMM is at all time, glad to publish 
any communication, which may be sent to it. but 
the Editors will assume no responsibility for the 
view, expressed, and do not necessarily endorse 
such views. 

To the Editor of the Collegian: 

Alumni, as also visitors, are quite de- 
pendant upon the undergraduate cheering 
section at any collegiate contest in the 
matter of knowing the men participating. 
Undoubtedly every one on the campus 
knows who "buddy", "Dick", "Phil", 
etc. are but we who are not as lortunaii 
receive little aid from the Use ot these 
nicknames. 

Would it not be better when cheering 

a man who may be entering or retiring 
from the field of battle to use his last 
name rather than his campus appellation? 
I am sure that all the spectators would 
appreciate such a change. 

David Potter 'HI 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUN31NGWEAR and MEDALIA 
SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $L39 $1.75 

G. Edward Fisher 



ALUMNI NOTES 



I 



lour alumni of the College are to 

participate in the program of the annual 

meeting of the American Society of 
Agonomy, held at the Congress Hotel, 
Chicago. 111., on November 16 and 17: 

Dr. A. L. Whiting 'OK. of the I'niv. of 
Wisconsin, is leader of a symposium 
program on "Soil Bacteriology -Nitrifi- 
cation Studies," and also presents a 

paper In the same program. 

Dr. B. L. Hart well '8», Director of the 
RhoC Island Experiment Station, pre 
sents a paper in another program on, 
•'The Development of ToXIC Conditions 
in the Soil." 

Dr. II. K. Hayes "08, of the Minnesota 
Agricultural Experiment Station in still 

a third program presents a paper on, 

"Present Day Methods of Corn Breeding." 

S. B. Haskell '01. of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Experimenl Station is leader 

in the symposium program, "S)il De- 
terioration." 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 

IS AT 

DRURY'S 

College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



The Mysterious TT 
And What is this much placarded TT? 

Well, there <in- frivolous suggestions, such 

as "Toooerville Trolley" and "Too 

Tired", but on the whole campus in 
genuit) seems tofavor something to do 

with l'u Its. Among others, there have 
Ik. n proposed: 



First Showing 



OF 



haven't anything ti 



with the football 



pari of a football game anyway. "The 
Anonymous Agates" could not be better 
if they "tie covered with numbers with- 
out number! 



r i 



The Wesleyan Parley 

The letter announcing the Weslevan 
Parley states the motive behind the 
Parity clearly and hi icily: "There are 
phases of higher education that students 
and scholars may profitably inquire into 
ami talk over together. Students too 
infrequently parley with men who are 
ahead of them in the adventure ot learn- 
ing, but when they do new and construc- 
tive ideas usually crystallise. Possibly 
some problems that now face educators 
will DC nearer solution when under 
graduates understand them." 

To this end, then, Wesleyan Cniversity 
is initiating an Intercollegiate Parley Ml 
American College Education. Colleges 



THREE MORE GAMES 

( 'on i trued from I'-.iUe 1 

1 lean I i ■ the snapperback, and \b 
t .i.ith, a tackle, are big coys in the line, 
me should be a k> <. n one bei aust 
the entire college is determined to win. 
Practical!) the entire student bod) is 
planning to make the trip to Amherst 
under the supervision of the Tufts Ivy 

Soi iety. 

The Agates final game is scheduled for 
Thanksgiving Day at Springfield. Spring- 
field has a good record to date, marred 
only bv the l»> to dehat from Amhersl 
last Saturday, lids is the firsl football 
game between these two colleges for 
several years. The outcome is problem- 
atical. The only comparison thai is 

even reasonable is by the showing ol each 

against the Sabtinas. Springfield was de- 
feated by two less touchdowns than MA. 

C. But Amherst had to revert largely to 
fast end runs and wide off-tackle plavs 
against their town rivals while they 
gained much ground through Springfield's 
line. Springfield showed more speed than 
MAC. but they have no such offering as 
the Lord Jeffs. Amhersl tackles and backs 
were able many times to break through 
and down the Red and White backs for 
losses or for very short gains. 



I able Tufts 

Taboo 

Taikle 

Take 

Trample 

I C.L 

rn 
an 

Tantalise 

Tatter 

Throw 

Tire 
Tomahawk" 

1 errity 

'Trim 



Trounce 

F< sch 

Totter 
Tumble 

Terminate 
Tether 
Thump 
Thrash 
Throttle 
Thwack 
Toboggan 
I ornado 
Tread on 



Tufts 



Christmas Cards 




MISS CUTLER'S 

..GIFT SHOP- 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

Come in and ask to hear Columbia 

Record NO.OT5D- The Suftar Foot 

Stomp by Fletcher Henderson 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHKRST BANK 



MEAL 

WRIGLEYS 

makes your food do you 
more good. 

Note how it relieves 
that stuffy feeling 
after hearty eating. 

Sweetens the 
breath, removes 
food particles 
from the teeth, 
gives new vigor 
to tired nerves. 

Comes to you 
fresh, clean and 
full-flavored. 




CP 



And that's that! 



ROISTER DOISTERS 

Thursday evening. November 1L\ the 
members of the Roister DotSteT Dramatic 
Society will go to Northampton for a 
theatre party. They will see the North- 
ampton Repertory Company's presenta- 
tion of "The Dover Road" by A. A. 
Milne. "The trip will Ik- made both wavs 
by motor bus. Professor antl Mrs. Frank 
Prentice Rand will accompany the party. 



Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity enter- 
tained the president of the national 
organization. Alvin T. burrows of I r- 
bana, Illinois, at • smoker last Wednesday 
evening. 



C. A. NOTE 

There will be a discussion group every 
Wednesday evening beginning November 
11th for members of the three upper 
classes, including both sexes. 'The first 
meeting will he held in Mr. Manila's 
ottice and a subject appropriate for 
Armistice Day will be discussed. The 
members of the group will tlet ermine the 
topics to be discussed at the future 
meetings. 



The Slickest Coat on the Campus ! 

cJfa*<4aA^cJYucfe«t 

s»tc viwj o»» ^ 

No well dressed college man is 
without one. It's the original, 
correct slicker and there's noth- 
ing as smart or sensible for 
rough weather and chilly days. 

Made of famous yellow water- 
proof oiled fabric. Has all- 
' round strap on collar and elas- 
tic at wrist-bands. 

Clasp-closing style 

Button-closing style 

Stamp the correct name in your 
memory, and buy no other. 
The "Standard Student" is 
made only by the Standard 
Oiled Clothing Co., N. Y. C. 

SUp one on 

ALL GOOD DEALERS 






SCHEYER TAILORED SUITS 

combine the luxury, and the economy of quality. For the 

better suits, overcoats and furnishings Consult "Tom" 

Knox Hats, Burberry Coats, Whitehouse and 

Hardy Shoes, Orlik Pipes 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 

The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 






J3 



HI MMMT 



/• IS 



r. 



ROSTONIANS 

1/SHOES FOIS. MENk/ 



. JB ■ ■ I ■ ■ ■ ■ 1^ 



Correct 

in 

College 

Style 





A shoe that 

lasts, and 

style that 

stays 



B0LLES SHOE SWRE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



CLASSES DIVIDE 

< oiiiiii ih-iI from page I) 
strond round to saw the latti-i from 

fun fur punishment. 
So the frosh were in hi^li feather when, 

liter donning their nightshirts, they made 
their wa\ to Alumni field. Their exulta 

tion, however, wss short-lived; for their 

enemies, although fortiidden to use 
p o ddies, were not wholly to lie denied, 
and the neophstes were compelled to 
leapfrog their wa\ across the held to the 
lower level, where the contest was to l>c 
held. The same mlcs prevailed as in 
previous years; two circles were formed, 
with the freshmen <ui the inside; at the 
first shot, the circles started to BIOVC in 

op posi te directions; .it the second, they 
broke and the struggle commenced. 

Many were the deeds ol valor ami leats 
ol Strength performed under the white 

glare ol the floodlights during tin- next 
seven minutes, bul the men oi 1928 
profited from e xperien ce, and when the 

dust ai\<\ smoke ol the conflicl had cleared 

away, only thirteen nightshirts remained 

iutai t. In addition to this, the sophomore 

pen contained forty-six dejected prisoners, 

while the frosh had lietn alile to capture 
only fourteen ol their opponents. Thus 
the victory went to the (las- ot l'.i_'S l.\ 

the overs/helming margin «»f I">1 II, 

giving them an even break on the contents 

oi the evening, and leaving l><>tl> classes 

well satisfied with their achievements. 
''.»."> II. \V. Lewis is now located al the 

t.r.md Hotel, :<ist and Broadway, New 
York City. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While I Wait 

NKW I'KK is 

Men";' Whole Sole«. RuM>er Heels - - - |XM 

Mens Half Soles, R»M»t 11,-Hn - - - 1.75 

Men's Rubber Soles, Rubber Heels - - 2. 2.* 

Men's Half Soles l.JS 

Work Guaranteed— AMHKRST HOt 

<)|*-ii lill I IV M. 



You will liiul an en ellanl 

. . . SHOK RKI'.\IRIN(; SHOP . . . 

equipped with the most up-to-date (.omlj.ir 
Machinery and a modern 

SHOK SHINING PARLOR 

at II J Amliy-St . - Kubrovit/ III... k 

II 7 uulfr slunil ymir rr>iuirrmr>it< ,m<! W* 
fiirrJ In mert your u, . 

ark Rutiratuertl. Skoit thitud and J\r<l. 

VINCENT GRANDONICO, Prop. 



TUTORING 

Do your themes come buck 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 8?2y 



WE ARE READY FOR THE 

JWNT1NG SEASON! 

Also, all kinds of Rubber Footwear 

always carried in stock. 

HOSIERY a Specialty 

JOHN POTTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOK STORE 



S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

t PLEASANT STRKKT. flip one llijlhtj 

Oculists Prescriptions Filled. Broken len..es 
accurately replaced 

BIC; BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
riii.ible makes 

If I haven't what you want I can (let it 

ROBERT C. AMES 

in pi 

Cloth, Watch and Jewelry Repliant. 

Diunond Si-ninn. Jewelnr, Clocks, Silverware, 
wati b' i, Di.iiiK.t 

46 PLEASANT STREET 

Corner of Hal lock Opp. Amherst Laundry 
at Miss Ida Russell'-. 

Telephone 54 1 -R 

SiigiTi 1 *ti"n Cut <.n dotted MsM ni"I ItMfJ fat Ntfif n-f« ■ 



Everything 

the new 
student needs 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

IN THE M BUILDING 




The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

The Hest in Drug Store Service 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

Th* Sana&L Storm 




WANTED: A man between the age of 25 and 35 to 
represent us in Northampton to take the place of II. K. 
Robbins, a former teacher at M.A.C., whom we recently 
promoted to manager in eastern Connecticut. Several 
teachers whom we have hired in the past two or three 
years have been very successful with us. Unusual oppor- 
tunity for the right man. 

HARRY E. BARLOW, Manager 

Connecticut General LhVlns. Co. 
387 Main St. 

Springfield, Mass. 



DEU EL'S 



Satisfy your hunger and thirst with the many good things at 
our fountain. Hot Waffles and Maple Syrup, (null sed) 
Sandwiches Toast Drinks Sundaes Smoke* tof course) 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY COODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 





How This 



College Man Found the Secret of 
Making Money Pleasantly and Easily 

THH year hefore he graduated, his father sold out his coffee 
business and r etired . 

But he wasn't the kind who could stay retired. 

"Son" hadn't made up his mind what to do after graduation, 
so knowing how he liked flowers, Dad kind of concluded he 
would have a decision ready. 

So he built this sassy little flower shop in one of the residen- 
tial sections of Indianapolis. 

Then he called us in to add the greenhouse, which he calls his 
"big glass show case". 

Dropped in to see them not so long ago. 

Say man, hut there i, jus) one of the nicest little gold mines 
I've humped into m many I day. 

A Jelinhtful business in every way, and growing every day. 

Hosf shout it, d think your Dud would chip in on a 

proposition like thai ' 

Write us. We'll g] 1 the facts you want, and then some. 

Mor? and I ' men are taking up this flower huMness 

every year. 

It's fun, and there's money in it — that's why. 

If interested write to the Manager of our Ser- 
vic< I )i-p.irtmi-nt, Uliner Hudd-nu. C l< vt-'and, 
Ohio, who will give it his personal attention. 



| oi*d, & j^tijnuSamip. 

Builders of Qreenhouses and Conservatories 

Eastern Factory Western Factory Canadian Factory 

Irvington,N. Y. Des Plaines, III. St. Catharines, Ont. 

Irvington New York Philadelphia Chicago 




Cleveland 
Boston 



Denver 

Buffalo 



:lphia 
Kansas City 
Montreal 



uis 
Greensboro 



Paper Supplies 
Stationery 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mass 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

RKPAIRINt; ANO AIX KINDS OK 
WASHIM. DONK AT KhASONAHI.K 
PRICES. 

Opposite Poet Office 



BOLTER OVERCOATS... 

If you can enjoy a little surprise, drop in and see our new OVERCOATS. The price, the fabrics, the styles, the colors, 
the tailoring, are all the perfect units that make up the perfect whole. . . 

Amherst (JARL. H. BOLTER Ilyannis 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 11. 1925 






Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 

Theirs. 

3.00. 
7..*0 



Friday 

Ml 

6.45, 8.M 



Clorlu Swuniiun in 
TIIK COAST OP KOI.I.Y" 
Modern, romantic, funny 
and ftorUeou*. 

From Conlnguby Dawnon's 
beat selling novel. 

News KableH Kducu- 
i tonal Comedy 

Barbara l.uMarr In 
•SANDRA" 

From the Popular Novel. 

Sport light I'athe Comedy 



A full supply of Fraternity and College Banners. Pennants, and Stationery 

WE WILL BE GLAD TO SHOW YOU OUR STOCK 

== YE AGGIE INN -^ = 



Saturday 

3.00, Ml 
8.30 



Douglas Mail.ean In 
•7 KEYS TO BALDI'ATE" 

CSS rjt Cohans gieutest 
comedy from the novel by 
Earle IJerr Hlggers. 
News Educational Comedy 



Mon. 

3.00, Ml 
8.30 



Tola Negri in 
• FLOWER O!' THE NICII I" 
written for her by Joseph 
H.riU-sheimer, a dramatic 
ami thrilling action play. 
Pa « he Review N I R« < '.omedy 



Next week lues. Wed. and 
Thins 

"THE TEN COMMAND- 
MRNT8" 



WORLD AGGIE NIGHT 

Continued from Page I) 

•27, Clarence II. Parsons '-'". Donald 
H. Campbell '88, James E. Hurnham 
'88, Carl A. Freser '-'•'» pianist. 

;,j Cheer Old Massachusetts -words 

by R. J- Flake 'l<». music byj : 

A. Prouty 'it). 
l> Madiey 
c) Lead On <> Massachusetts — ¥. D. 

Criggs '13 

i. Talk by Erne* S. Russell, Preskieal 
of the AUmiiii Association. 

7. Mrs. A. I. Cance, violin solo. 

B Serenade Schubert 

in Spinning Song Dieml 
s. Som oi old Massachusetts Howard 

I.. Knighl '08 ensemble. 
'.». College cheer. 



Prof. Brooke D. Drain of the depart 
,nen of tautology lias just had published 
I „ew volume entitled "Kssentials of 
Systematic Pomology". John Wiley & 
Sons of New York City are the publishers. 



Grange Grocery Store COLLEGE SHOES 

— AT — 

TOWN PRICES 






tor Men who Demand Style— 

You will find nothing more satisfac- 
tory than one of our new Fall suits 
that we have just unpacked. The 
price you will find reasonable as is true 
of everything that we sell. 

Winter Overcoats are also ready. Pick 
yours out now while the assortment 
is at its best. 



PLAYLOVERS 

Note That 

THE WEEK OF NOV. 9 

{Excluding Wednesday, Nov. 11 ) 
Paul Hansell is presenting 

The Horthampton Repertory Company 

— IN — 
A. A. Milne's Delightful Comedy 

"THE DOVER ROAD" 

AT THE 
NORTHAMPTON 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

Brinlnif m Ul Bat. M " ■'< ~ i: ' 

PliCM; 50c. to 11.10. (iii< In. litis Uix; 

Psoas sta" 



GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 



We carry *. !.« In ev. ry ,h,„, | PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



CHILDREN'S BOOK WEEK 

NOVEMBER 9 to 14 

CHRISTMAS WILL SOON BE HERE 
Come in and get a ^ojdMbo^kJorJittle brother or sister 

AUTOGRAPHED COPIES 
of DAVID GRAYSON'S BOOKS 



Ne»t Week -CANDIDA" : 






F. M. Thompson & Son 



Killing the 



Feeding 




Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST Si DEACON. Prop»- 




„„||| SOPHOMORES JUNIORS SENIORS ATHLETES 

Do You Know? 
"HOW TO STUDY" 

Th. S.-d.n,. ll..d.B«* of P....10.1 IHo,. on ,1.. «*■ •< 

Effective Study 
by WU-LIAM ALLAN BROOKS 
A GUIDE -.a,...;, i r; ., ;; .S t O^ 

RESUL1S.I • iK.i.n i ovl . rW orke.l st.ul.-nts and athlete* 

miSuVf^l^^SSSiStm ,W * -* hOU ° r StUaCntS 
are WorUss h* higk l iawa S nV ach.evemcnt. 

Some of the Topics covered 



THE farmer who knows what 
goes into his livestock rations 
—the one who always keeps 
careful records of his 
production and of his 
feed cost— is putting his 
farm on a businesslike 
basis which yields him 
profits far above those of 
the feeder who guesses. 

When you feed Purina 
Chows, you eliminate the 
guess. The very finest selected 
ingredients are carefully 
analyzed for quality in 




the Purina Mills laboratories. 

They are then thoroughly 

cleaned and uniformly mixed 

by modern machinery. 

There's no guessing 
about Purina quality —or 
about Purina results 
either. The actual daily 
records and cost sheets 
of feeders from the 
Atlantic to the Rockies bear 
witness to the unquestionable 
ability of Purina Chows to 
lower the cost of producing 
milk, eggs, pork and beef. 



PURINA MILLS 

963 Gratiot St., St. Lows, Mo. 

Buffalo Nashville 

Fort Worth East St. Louis 
Kansas City Minneapolis 



Scientific Shortcuts in Effective 

Study. . 

Preparing lor Examinations 
Wrltlntt Cood Examinations. 
Brain and Digestion in Relation 

How WSm Lecture and Reading 

Ad^anTages and Disadvantages of 
Cramming. 



Diet During Athletic Training. 
How to Study Modern Languages. 
How to Study Science. Literature. 

etc. 
Why Go to College? 
Alter College, What? 
Developing Concentration ana 

Efficiency. „ 

The Athlete and His Studies, 
etc., etc.. etc.. etc.. etc.. etc., 



Why You Need This Guide 

ctJS^TVKtfS a n n\. an'.nsu.H.ra.-le ohstaeW to contentmen, l>ro,. 
A '"SwrOOTUDY" Wttl show you how to avoid all misdirected effort. 

Get a goodYtar, »" d make ,hta *" " h * M ' 8UCCeSsfUl ^ * -*" 

for this hand-look and Kiude NOW. 

You Need This Intelligent Assistance 



CLIP! 
AND MAIL 
TODAY 



\merieun Student I'u'.dishets, 
22 West SM St. New TOVk. 

GetitlFBwn: 
Pteaat (end me ■ copy of "How to Study for 

which I enclose -51 X»« ■ i-h. SI .10 che.:k. 

Name 

Address 




$50.00 



This Week Only! — 

SPECIAL VALUES IN FOUR PIECE SPORT SUITS at - - - 

You cannot afford to let this opportunity pass _„^„ _ 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & 



GAULT 



j|hg jfflaflgaritiwttB fflflllggtfn 



Vol. XXXVI. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, NOV. 18, 1925 

SENIORS WHO PLAY THEIR LAST GAME ON ALUMNI FIELD 



= Mo. 8 




THURLOW 



SULLIVAN 



MOBERG 



JONES 



CUSTAFSON 



couiik; 



GAVIN 



Seven Regulars to Play 

Last Ga me Her e Saturday 

Maroon and White will Lose Eleven Men from the First Squad 

by Graduation 



Seven regulars of the M.A.C. football 
Mad and four first string subs will play 
their last game on Alumni Field against 
Tufts Saturday. The clrss of 1926 has 
contributed for three years to Aggie 
football in even larger measure than any- 
one fully realizes. 

Let us start with Captain "Larry" 
Jones. "Larry", with his inseparable 
friend, "Al" Gustafson and "Buddy" 
Moberg, constitute a Brockton High 
football contribution to Aggie which will 
lmig Ik- remembered and honored. "Larry" 
piaad most prestige last year when he 
earned a place among the leading scorers 
of the New Kngland colleges through his 
p h enome n al ability to kick goals. 

GastofiaM started Aggie football as 
captain of the Hl'ifi freshman team. "Cus" 
has always been a hard worker. Although 
he Ii.in carried the ball little he has gained 
many yards by clearing paths lor others. 

<iiis' alxi is one of the l>est defensive 
bada that has worn a maroon jersey for 
RVeral years, a hard tackier and a grittv 
tighter. 

"buddy" Moberg. another Brockton 
product, also has been invaluable to Mass. 
Afjjje football. He has done the punting 
credit ably and he is now showing up in a 
relatively new light, as a forward passer, 
long tjains have been chalked up for him 
this leasoa when he has tried the ends of 
his opponents' lines. 

Red" Sullivan is the one who made the 
'famous off-tackle play" famous. The 
interference has been outstanding so that 
of course the whole team contributed to 
this distinction but "Red" is a plugger 
and he covered many yards pushing 
several of his opponents ahead of him 
after the play had covered its theoretic 
'listanre. Although not a flashy runner 
he has covered much ground this fall 
often alternating with Moberg or some- 
limes taking the ball himself consecutively. 

Couhig, Thurlow, and Gavin are all 
forwards. The Aggie line is considered 
by all her opponents as her greatest asset. 
These three men have contributed con- 
siderable to make this opinion possible. 

Phil" Couhig, who has been aptly called 
the "big little man", is one of the few 
'xceptions if we take George Owen's 
statement to be true. "Phil" really 
en )oys the game. He is in it every minute 
a "d is therefore a defensive center of no 
"lean ability as well as a 99A4% perfect 
(Continued on Pafte 2) 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Thursday— 
•' •■*•"> p. m. Assembly. Speaker, 
Rev. Louis E. Cornish of Boston. 
Saturday— 
' I ni. Vanity Football. M.A.C". 
N - Tufts at Alumni Field. 
• >ame Informal. 
Sunday— 

i ni. Sunday Chapel. Speaker, 

R*v. J. Herman Randall, Com- 

tnity Church, New York City. 

Wednesday— 

'-' ' to Monday 7.30a. m. Thanks* 

. Kens-. 



FLOWER SHOW 
ATTRACTS MANY 



Daniel J. Connor, Mt. Holyoke 
Gardener, Wins Skinner Cup. 

Last Sunday marked the close of the 
finest annual Fall Flower Show ever held 
in the history of the college. The show 
opened Friday evening and ended Sunday 
evening, during which period over 1IKM) 
visitors viewed the diipl.v The show 
was staged by the I- loriculture Club in 
conjunction with the Holynki- and North 
amp! on Florists' and Gardeners' Club. 
I he exhibition was under the general 
supervision of Professor Clark L. Thayer 
and its great success is principally the 
result of his ability together with that ol 
the- other members ol hi* Maff. 

The exhibition was made up chiefly of 
chrysanthemums although many Other 
varieties were on display. The main 
feature of the show was I display showing 
the evolution of the chrysanthemum from 
it- wild state to its present highly s|x'cial- 
ized condition. There were specimens 
showing each step of its evolution in its 
upward march. Another interesting lea 
(Continued on Page 3) 



ADELPHIA CONDUCTS 

STUDENT FORUM 

Much Interest Shown in Proposition 
of Unlimited Cuts and Free Choice 
of Electives. 



The first Student Forum of the present 
college year was held at Assembly last 
Thursday, and was in charge of Adelphia. 
President John Temple opened the Forum 
by telling briefly of the nature and the 
purposes of the society. He was followed 
by Charles Reed, who brought to the 
attention of the student body the general 
laxity in adhering to various college rules 
and traditions, among which he men- 
tioned the matter of walking on the 
lawns, the question of speaking on the 
campus, the habit of rattling hymn books 
in Chapel, and the tradition that coats 
should be worn to all Chapel and Assembly 
exercises, the last of these occasioning 
some discussion. Ray Smiley then brought 
up the subject of unlimited cuts and free 
choice of electives for those students who 
attained a certain grade in their studies. 
In the lively discussion which followed, 
most of the speakers expressed themselves 
as being in favor of the proposed change, 
but definite action WM postponed until 
the next Student Forum. Following this. 
Joseph Cormier introduced the question 
of whether athlete- shoUtd be made in 
eligible for parttcipation in i sport be- 
cause of Ixinv; low in some of their Studies, 
and pointed OUl how this ruling is often 
unfair. There Wat BO adverse comment 

upon the question. At the dose of the 

Forum, President Temple administered 

to the date of MSB the oath of aliegiena 
to the College. 



WORLD AGGIE NIGHT 

VERY SUCCESSFUL 



Radio Program From WBZ Features 
Evening's Entertainment. 



Sixty-four alumni were present at the 
Amherst meeting on World Aggie Night 
last Friday to make this World Aggie 
Night meeting one of the most successful 
that have been held here. The gathering 
met in the Memorial Building at S p. m. 
and the first hour of the program was taken 
up by dancing and bowling. At nine 
o'clock a short shaking program VM 
opened. Mr. T. L. Warner '(18, of Sunder- 
land, spoke of the work of the joint faculty 
and alumni committee with the legis 
lature. His talk was followed by a speed, 
by Rolwrt Hawley 'IS who reviewed t he- 
general progress of the- college during the 
past year. After the speaking program 

sev eral vocal selections, were rendered l>\ 
■ few Members of the undergraduate body. 

Then the group gathered around the tables 
to enjoy a buffet lunch and to listen to the 

special World Aggie Night radio program 

which was broadcasted from station WBZ 

in Springfield. The evening was great!) 

enjoyed by all who wen- present and it 
was considered a success in every way. 



MASS MEETING 



FRIDAY NIGHT AT 7.30 

The Team will be There 

"Kid'' will Speak 

The Band will be There 

Other Old Aggie Stars and 
Boosters Will Say A Tew Words 

H\ and All Loyal Agates 
BE THERE! 

Bring your razoos and two good lungs 
The Band will Lead Parade 
From Q\ T. V. House at 7.15 



Tufts Informal 
Proves Popular 

Both Floors of Memorial Building 
Will be Used. 



Because of the unusual demand for 
informal tickets, both floors in the Mem- 
orialmBuilding will be used for the Tufts 
Informal on Saturday, and fifty additional 
programs and tickets have been placed 
on sale. 

The Hollywood Sextet of Springfield, 
will furnish the music for one of the halls. 
The other orchestra has not as yet been 
procured. The party will be chaperoned 
by Mrs. Crane, of Mt. Holyoke College, 
and Mr. and Mrs. George Cotton of 
M.A.C. The Smith chaperone will be 
announced later. 

The usual delectable "informal" dinner 
will be served at Draper Hall at (L30 p. m. 



HAVE YOU JOINED 



THE TT CLUB? 



The- TT Club is anxious to have? in- 
cluded in its membership ev e r y o n e at lively 
connected with M.A.C. Its rushing squad 
is working hard but if anyone is over- 
looked he need not 1«- afraid of losing ■ 
bid by putting himself forward. 

You may !><• surprised to and out tne- 
reel purpose of the organization. It you 
have alreadj guessed, you realise why we 
want you. Step up and receive your I 1 



Lowell Textile Beaten 

In Slow Game, 41-6 

Many Penalties and Injuries in Rough Game. Hilyard and 
Haertl both Cross Goal Line Twice 



TUFTS GAME TO 

COME SATURDAY 



Aggie's Chances Look Good on Basis 
of Comparative Scores. 



Saturday, M.A.C. meets Tufts on 
Alumni Field. Tufts has had a poor sea- 
son so far but she will still consider it a 
success it she outseote-s the- Agates. A 
holiday has been declared for Saturdav 
on Tufts College Hill and special trans- 
portatioa has bean provided for several 
h un d r ed supporters ol the- brows ami blue. 
Tufts has lost to Norwich, Connecticut, 

New Hampshire, Middle-bury, tad Bow- 
cloin. But she has defeated Maine, the 
Pine Tree- Stale 1926 football champion, 
in an early BCOSM game. Maine also held 

the University ol New Hampshire eleven 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Two Year Men Lose 

to C.A.C. Freshmen 

Nutmeg Neophytes Conquer by Score 
of 



"Red" Ball's Two Yeaf aggregation 

\cas force-d to take- the- ioser'l end of an 
S to score when they were oven ome by 
the Connecticut Aggie freshmen at 
Storrs last Friday on a slip|>ery, muelcly 
field. The Massachusetts boys made IK 
tirst downs as compared with one by 
their opponents, but they could not 
furnish the necessary punch to score, 
although they had the- ball within the 
yearling 20 yard stri|je throughout the 

final period. 

Kelley and Johnson continued their good 
work in the- bae kfield, and the entire line 
played an aggressive game, but the 
team suffered a severe loss when Truelson 
seriously injured his knee. He will not 
be able to play in the final game of t he- 
season at Deerfield Academy next Friday 
where his gexxl generalship and educated 
toe will be sorely missed. Summary: 



Freshmen 

Hewitt, le 
Sayers, It 
Calicurcio, lg 
Callahan, c 
Me Namara, rg 
Wilson, rt 
Usher, re 
Knaut, cib 
Dixon, Ihb 
Sahagian, rhb 
Brown, fb 

Score- by periods 



M.A.C. 2 Yr. 

re, Viale 

rt, Ryan 

rg, Shelnut 

c, Lovejoy 

lg, Burgevin 

It, Caffrey 

le, Burrell 

qb, Truelson 

rhb, Tribe 

lhb, Johnson 

fb, K.ll.-y 

12 3 4 Ttl. 



Conn. Freshmen 2 () 6 0—8 

Referee- (.user, C.A.C I'mpire — 

Whaples. C.A.C. Head linesman Dole-, 
( . \.( . Time l.Vminute periods. Sub- 
stitutions: Connecticut Met for M< 
Namara. Peck for Csber, (.ilmin for 
Call urc io, Crombic for Mitt, Hooper for 

Sayers, Dahl for Peck, White for brown, 
Anderson for Dixon, ( ox for Knaut. 
Bushnell for Callahan, Aschenbach for 

Hewitt. Williams for Sahagian; MA < 

Peabod) for Johnson. Mi~-.i loi liibc. 
1'raits for TrueUon. 



The Mass. Aggies top|ied Lowell 
Textile 41 to ti, on Alumni T ield last 
S^tt unlay in a slow, rough game. Many 
paaaltiea and injuries prolonged the con- 
test. Following l.owe-ITs touchdown in the 
third period, Fredericks m and Sullivan 
were sent to the showe-rs by Ke-feree Bairy 
for slugging, although no one but the 
referee saassj to think the- Aggie half- 
back's banishment was justified. 

Early in the first period, Guatafsoa and 

Couhig, l>oth of whom have been out with 
"trick knees" before, weie- injure-d, (Juinn 

replacing Guatafsoa and kfulham, Couhig 
Haertl was designated i<» call aigaala 

\1 \< reco ver ed I Lowell tumble near 
the visitors' goal line in the early minute, 
and Hilyard plunged over 00 tin- m\t 
play. MAC. kicke-d of and forced 

Lowell to pant, Sullivan carried the ball 
repeatedly for long and coo isteni gains 

to near Lowell's end SAM and Hilyard 

plunged across the aero in.uk again. 

In the third period Lowell made its 

tally alter a sevent) s vrn-yard run by 
Corbet t, Lowell's outstanding offensive 

player, alter be had pushed through 

tackle-. Corbet! was brought clown e»n 
the- eight yard line by Larry Jon s. Three 

line smashes netted only tWO yards but 
on the- fourth down Corbett forward 

passed to Guild who caught it in the cad 

Bona. Moberg, who replaced Sullivan, 

re cov e r ed a fumble on the lir-t play after 

the Irickoff and alternated with Haertl 
to bring the- ball in scoring distance. Tin- 
tally was made when a pass liom Mobe-rg 

to Haertl was per fect ly executed. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



HARRIERS COMPLETE 
SUCCESSFUL SEASON 

Team Wins Five out of Six Dual 
.Meets. Good Material Left for 
Next Year. 



The M.A.C. cross country team con 
eluded the most successful season they 
have enjoyed in recent years when they 
participated in the New Kngland Inter- 
collegiates at Franklin Park, Jamaica 
Plain, last Monday afternoon. 

The- harriers lost only one elual meet 
out of a total of six, three of which were 
abroad. Wesleyan gained the honor of 
being the only te-am to defeat M.A.C. 
this fall by ejutrunning the Aggies at 
Middle-town on ()< tobe-r 21st. Wesleyan 
was subsequently tie-d by Williams in a 
triple meet in which Amherst was the 
third entrant. Both Amherst and Williams 
had previously been decisively conquered 

by the- Agates. 

The outstanding fe-ature of all the races 

Nros the teamwork disptayec Only once 

did SO MA.( man come- in first, and in 
f Continued on Page I) 



OPPONENTS' SCORES 



Amherst It, Williams 7 
Bowdokt 13, Tufts 7 
Conn. Aggies 0, Rhode Island o 
St. Stephens 31, Norwich 6 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 18, 1925 







THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 
Mary T. Boyd '26 Editor-in-Chief 

Jqhn F. Lambekt '26 



Managing BdUOi 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial M*«v T. Boyd JJ 

Cider PreM Mary T. Boyd » 

Athletic. William L. Dole 27 

Harold L Clark 28 

Campu.New. Raymond F. D.fley '27 

Ellsworth Barnard 28 

Josephine Panzica '28 

Co-Ed New. Frances C. Bruce '27 

Faculty New. E-nest L. Spencer 28 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Alvin G. Stevens '26 Bu.inew Manager 

Edw.N A. Wilder'28 Adverting Manager 

Lewis H. Whitaker '27 Circulation Manager 

John E. White '27 

Douglas W. Losing '28 

Charles W. CUMSQ '27 



Subscription J2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the \*uia*m 
manager as soon as possible. 

brtai»sYaSS»C4Sd-claSS matter at tttC A'"'"' 1 ; 1 
|.„V ,l .lM -A,, .•,...•.! for tnailinK ***&'£ 
of postage- provided for in section 1HB. Act ol 
tobti. 1917 -.iutlusUai August 20. 1918. 



RUSHING 

There U ■ itrUdaf situation in CONegei 
throughout the country in regard to what 
h considered to be the moat ticklish Sub- 
ject in rollegiati a« tivitUs. namely fiat. -r 

nitv rushing. CoUeget, as a whole, arc 

dissatisfied with the various rushing sys- 
tern*. M.A.I . is no exception. Although 
the sNstini used this fall seems to have 
Worked well, then are too manv argu- 
ments for a change to have the thinking 
undergraduate sat Mud. The Inter-fratcr 

nitv Co nferen ce has sccouned its intention 

ol discussing the subject in the mar 
futUrt and it has sugg.stcd as a possible 
alternative second term rushing without 
any earlier rushing reason. This system 
hat inert tried lief.u. and then abandon. <l 
for one similar to the one now in force. 
Each fratcrnitv has probably debated be- 
tween the two but fraternities are nnstcri- 
ous things. The purpose of this editorial 
i> to aioiisc open dis( ussion. We shall try- 
to r nscnt all the pofott that haxe come 
to our attention for either side of the 
question without trying to refute any of 
them. 

Deferred Season Helps Frosh 
I irst, there are the reasons given for a 
deferred rushing season in place of a first 
term system. Ironi the fnshmen's pOMi 
of view there are two general arguments. 
Although the opening of college for all is 
accomianied by considerable confusion, 
on the whole life is not nearly as hectic 
for the uppcr-classim n as for the freshmen. 
The new man must get used to the college 
sNstem of classts. They must learn the 
eccentricities of all their professors while 
their seniors generally know something 
•bout them all. They must acclimate 
themselves Jt>1ivTnfr with a group of men 
of varying interests and personalities. 
And on top of all this, they must get 
accounted with greek letter fraternities 
in general and the MAC. fraternities in 
particular. This situation means placing 
a good tleal of responsibility on a young 
man all at once. 

It has been aptly said that, "choosing 
a fraternity is as important a step in a 
man's life as choosing a wife." Even if 
the other conflicting interests were dis- 
regarded, is not a week a short time for 
a man who has never understood anything 
about greek letter fraternities to decide 
one one out of ten? But let us even dis- 
regard the men who have little knowledge 
of fraternities; there will still be many 
who have had little experience in judging 
men in a short time. Is it wise for these 
men to use snap judgment in making as 
great a decision as choosing the group 
with which they will spend their four 
years at college and which will have more 
influence on their development than any 
other? More time to look around and to 
think it over is I solution for the freshmen. 

More Time for Upper Classes 

Moreover, the upper-classmen would 
benefit by more time. A fraternity may 
choose much more intelligently after 
knowing a freshman's record in college, 
not only his record in scholarship, but 

also his record in activities. In addition 

to a good personality. I freshman must be 
good enough in the classroom to stay in 
college if he is to b<' a member of a 
fraternity, and he must \n- good enough 
to be eligible in the Dean's Office if lit is 



to partake of the extra-curricula campus 
activities. Therefore, it is advantageous 
to the fraternities to have some informa- 
tion on his scholastic ability. 

We have already mentioned personality. 
We do not say that the candidate must 
have a positive personality, many bi^ 
men in college have dcvclo|>ed that at let 
matriculating. Hut the fraternities want 
to know the possibilities and little that is 
accurate can In- determined in a few brief 
observations. I'pper-classmen are well 
aware that they are less well acquainted 
with their juniors than with their seniors. 
But they are bound to get a general 
knowledge of the new men during the 
first term that they could not |K>ssibly 
get in one week, aspsdaNy if they are 
Wgcd to look around by the approach of 
a rushing season. In fact there will be 
tendency for upper-classmen to know the 
lower classes better which would Ik- a 
lunefit to the entire college. 

On the other hand, there are several 
reaaOttt against the abolition of first term 
rushing. 

Frosh Helped by Fraternities 
hirst of all, most fraternities arc loathe 
to lose men after they have been pledged. 
If a freshman is having difficulty with 
any or all of his work, his prospective 
fraternity brothers help him. They 
correct his English themes as much ;i- 
they can, they figure out math problems 
lor him, they try to explain the theories 
of chemistry and the intricacies of French 

.Hid German grammar, and, most impor- 
tant of all, they try to point out the 
eccentricities of the various professors 
which we have already mentioned. Many 
men have been kept in college and have 

kept up by these means 

More Rivalry Created 

In addition, the men who prove best 
able to make the grade without help from 
those who have gone before and the best 
athletes who stay in college will un- 
doubtedly Ik- marked by every fraternity. 
If every one dec ides to rush these men and 
possibly overlooks the rest of the class, 
a vcrv undesirable -ituation will arise 
Keen as the rivallry is now, it will be M 
a game of ring-around-a rosie to the 
rivalry thus created And the losers will 
suffer much more than losers now. 
Weak Fraternities Hampered 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 18. 1925 



AT THE ABBEY 



We have heard from several very 
different sources another argument . It is 
generally known that the different frater- 
nities live in cycles. For a year or two 
one fraternity may be outstanding, hut 
for only a year or two. Soon another steps 
up and the former steps back and grad- 
ually becomes weaker until it reaches a 
minimum of influence from which it 
grows again to power. But when fresh- 
men have time to examine the fraternities 
those that are unfortunate enough to be 
at the lK)ttom of the cycle must certainly 
suffer. For these, a short season is best. 
Strain on Fraternity Honor 
Hut by far the most striking reason of 
all for early rushing concerns the strain 
on fraternity honor. Let us assume that 
every fraternity lives up to the spirit of 
the rules as well as the letter, we cannot 
ask for more than that. Even then, each 
will watch its rivals closely. If a frater- 
nity man seems to Ik- talking to a fresh- 
man too often, even though the frequency 
is accidental, the members of his rival 
fraternities will Ik- suspicious. The activi- 
ties of legacies will be scrutinized. Agates 
who pick up freshmen on the road, bum- 
ming or going home, will be suspected. 
In fact, there will be a tendency toward 
suspicion on all sides. Moreover, while 
the suspicion itself is undesirable, it may 
lead to actual violation of the rules through 
just plain human nature. 

These are some of the arguments on 
this subject. We have tried to cover all 
the important ones and to do justice to 
each one but we cannot say dogmatically 
that we have succeeded. By leaving the 
issue hanging in this way we hope to 
bring forth some student comment. The 
student forum was one chance for a 
public expression of opinion, the com- 
munication column of the Collegian is 
another. W. L. D. 



Men are Co-eds! 

Tell me, what is a co-ed? 

That's easy; a CO-ed is a woman who is 
educated in the same institution as a 
man or vice vers;). 

But why does it always mean a girl? 

Because in the old days men dominated, 
and consequently when they permitted 
women to enter their classrooms, and 
gave them co-edu -ation, they called them 
"co-eds" to distinguish them from the 
college students. 

But aren't girls students? 

They certainly are. 

Then how can they discuss whether or 
not men and co-eds shall have the same 
c'.assrooms, if they are both college 
students? 

you can talk about anything, but the 
very word "co-ed" tells the story. 

Then a college student is a college 
student, without any distinction, and a. 
man is just as much a cocci as a woman 

realty? 

Exactly right. The connotation of the 
word favon a reference to girls, but. when 
you come right down to it — Men are 
cc-eds too! 

CP 

Ain't You Right ! 
Salcsgir pardon us, saleslady, to 

Professor's wile: 1 his is our new perfume. 
"VAime/ Que Moi " "Don't Love No- 
body But Me." 

CP 

What Price Charity? 
What with the Anti-< '.ratuity League 
and Mr. Rockefeller and his extravagant 
bestowals of shiny new dimes to those 
who have served him, it is refreshing CO 
come Upon the example set by our Sultan 
of Tin, Mr. Henry Ford. 

He recently bought, it seems, a new 
house organ. Incidentally, with a player 
attachment. He was so pleased with it 
that he wrote to the manufacturing 
company and asked for a list of all those 
in any way connected with making his 
cherished music box, and when the com- 
pany gladly supplied him with a list (of 
nearly everyone on the pay-roll!) he sent 
to every person on it a check for $100. 

We suggest that the college find out 

what Mr. Lord would like next, and then 

that we all join in in the manufacturing. 

Could you use one of those *100 checks? 

CP 



Last Friday evening, the S.C.S. held a 
victrola party in the Abbey living room. 
About fifteen couples attended; Mrs. 
Marsh was chaperon. 

M 

The Arena was the scene of a I larvest 
Party, given by Delta Phi (iamma. last 
Friday evening. The feature of the 
evening was an Amherst-Aggie football 
game (Aggie won). Refreshments were 
taffy-apples. Marion Cassidy won the 
prize for the best impersonation, appearing 
as Jackie Coogan; Marguerite Bosworth 
had the cleverest costume and Mary 
Ingraham appeared in the funniest. The 
eha|K-rones were Mrs. Yount and Miss 
Mary Foley. 



COMMUNICATIONS 



The Sayings of Sophisto 

An argument with an instructor is like 
a stone thrown in deep water; it vanishes 
quickly and is lost to sight forever. 

Apply thyself diligently to thy studies, 
my son, and no untimely quiz shall dismay 
thee; nay, not even to the Dean's Board 
shall fright be extended. 

But if thou dost not so delve, let thy 
tongue drip with the honey of politeness; 
thou mayst be filled with indifference, 
but give not away to a display of feeling. 
For lo, many more flies are caught with 
honey than with vinegar. 

A timely display of deep attention hast 
saved many a man from untimely interro- 
gation. 

A straight posture and a beaming eye 
before a vacant bean will carry thee 
farther than much knowledge coated with 
indifference. 

Yea, than much fine knowledge masked 
behind a yawn. 

My son, I charge thee, be good in thy 
work; but if thou canst not be good, look 
clever. 
Selah. 

CP 

Eve-n So! 

Joe Frosh wants to know why they call 
it "Adams House" when any one can 
perfectly well see that it ought to be 
"Eve's House" instead. 

CP 

And that's that! 



LOWELL TEXTILE BEATEN 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

M.A.C.'s final score resulted from a 
seventy-yard-dash assisted by Haertl 
from a line play. He was brought down 
on the fourteen yard mark. A penalty 
on the next play set the Agates back five- 
yards but Haertl again knifed through for 
a touchdown on the succeeding play. 

The summary: 

Aggies Textiles 

CeM)k. le re, Coffey 

Gavin, It rt - Peterson 

Tulenko, Ig rg, W. Smith 

Couhig, c c, Ben. lev 

Thurlow, rg Ig. Lairweather 

Amslein. rt 't. Bigui 

Jones, re US, Brosnan 

Gustafson, <it > qb, Frad erich so n 

Sullivan. Ihb rhb. < mild 

Haertl, rhb Ihb, Shea 

Hilyard fb fh - Parkin 

Score by periods 12^4 Ttl. 

Mass. Aggie 19 ? 1 14—41 

Lowell Textile t> 0— 6 

I ouchdowns— Hilyard 2, Sullivan, 
Haertl J, Moberg, Cuild. Points from 
try after touchdown — Jones ">. Keferee — 
J. K. Barry of Boweloin. Lmpirt — A. W 
Keane. Head linesman — T. P. Shea of 
Boston University. Time, four lo-minute 
periods. Substitutions. Textiles— Cor!>ctt 
for Shea, Lussier for Frederickson, Birke 
for Lussier. league fe>r Brosnan, Skinner 
for Lairweather, Hale for Coffey, Mo 
Keiinon lor CuiWL Lriberg for Peterson. 
M. inlet t for Parkin; Aggies— Black for 
Tulenko. Baker for Black, Mulhern for 
Couhig, C»uinn for C.ustafson. Nichols for 
Hilyard. Moberg for Sullivan, C.ustafson 
for Nichols, Hilyard for C.ustafson, 
Richardson for Cook, Cook for Richard- 
son, Spelman for Nichols, Fessenden for 
Gavin, McAllister for Mulhern. Mahoney 
for Moberg, Plantinga for Marx, Tuttle 
for Cook, Karrer for Tuttle, Marx for 
Amstein, Malley for Tuttle, Rice for 
Malley, Trull for Black, Rhoades for 
Trull. Baker for Thurlow. Capone for 
Quinn. 



The Collegian in at all time* glad to publuh 
any communication* which may be «ent to it. l, ut 
the- Editor* will a»»umc no responsibility foi 
views expressed, and do not necessarily endorse 
such views. 

Nov. 1"). 1938, 

Editor of the Collegian : 

The Springfield papers of Sunday, con- 
tain quite glowing reports of the aBsgel 
pugilistic encounter upon Alumni Field 
iK-tween Frederickson of Lowell Textile 
School and Sullivan of Mass. Aggie, t ) ne 
paper says, "When Referee Barry found 
them swapping punches, both went to the 
showers." These newspaper statements 
made with the complacent, but somewlut 
uninformed attitude of the press, often 
lead to misunderstandings and unjust 
criticisms Out of courtesy to one of the 
finest sportsmen I have ever seen on any 
football field, I should like to give my 
"close-up" version of the affair. 

During the play in which Lowell s: ored 
its lone touchdown, Frederickson sad 
Sullivan fell to the ground together. The 
Lowell player, who had hurt his MAS 
earlier in the game took a hard fall. As 
he strove to rise, he le>st his head momen- 
tarily and called Sullivan a few ■■rats. 
The referee, hearing what he thought \\a> 
a fight, orelered both men off the field 
without asking any questions. To me, 
the- decision sceme-d a hasty and an in- 
considerate one. To the ejected players 
it came .is a surprise, ami to one of them, 
at least, as a bitter disappointment. 

I have had the pleasure of seeing 1 >on,ili| 
Sullivan play many games of football, I 
have teen him take with I grin some <>l 
the worst physical punishment ever 
handed out to a football player. In all ol 
those games I can not re-call any ciUK 
when Sullivan showed any inclination 
tow are! rough play or rowdiness on the 
athletic fielel. Yet the careless judgment 
of a referee and the "feature fever" of 
the press have unwittingly tried to brand 
"Sully" as a brawler. 

Aggie stue'ents know that 'Red' 
Sullivan is far front being a man ol that 
type. We know him to Ik- a gentleman 
of the first class; a goed clean athlete, 
and a man who is a friend to all who 
have had the good fortune of coausj 
into contact with his genial personality. 
All the readers of the Springfield papen 
do not know "Red" as we do. T atre f ow 
every loyal Aggie man should do hi- 
utmost to right the wrong that has been 
dene to one of the finest men who lu^ 
ever worn the Maroon and White on the 
athletic field. Howard ftaSNU. 



HARRIERS COMPLETE 
(Continued from Page 1) 

that case, the entire squad finished seven 

I abreast to overwhelm W. P. I. Captain 
"Herbie" Bartlett '20 made an excellent 
leader for the team, and his loss will be 
keenly felt next year as will be that of 
Wheeler '2<>, who continually finished 
among the first. The five other members 
of the sepiad. Nottebaert '27, Biron '27, 
Swan '27, Crooks '27 and Preston '28 
will be favored contenders in 1920. Among 
these. Crooks, a verteran harriers, has 
displayed consistent form throughout the 
present season, and Biron, a newcomer 
this year, has made a very commendable 



showing. Preston, another new member 
who is only a sophomora, gives promise of 
developing into a good runner. His best 
performance was made in the meet with 
Amherst when he finished next to Lane of 
Amherst, who broke the recotd for the 
M.A.C. course. Henneberry '27 and 
Forest '28 have offered planty of com- 
petition this fall and will be ready to step 
into the shoes of Captain Bartlett and 
Ellsworth Wheeler next year if more 
fe>rmidable competitors do not appear. 

Candidates for the relay team will 
soon Ik? called out in preparation for the 
winter season. Repairs must be made on 
the board track before practice can be 
he-Id with safety. 



TUFTS GAME TO COME 

(Continued from Page 1) 
to a tie score. Tufts, although beaten 
by the Nutmeg Aggies, held them score- 
less for three periods and never allowed 
them to cross her goal line. The Univ. of 
New Hampshire won by a single field 
goal, the score being 9 to 6. 

M.A.C. and Tufts both have teams com- 
poser! of a majority of veterans. Couhig 
and True, the rival centers, have matched 
wits before. McGrath and Share were 
the tackles who stopped the off-tackle 
play. McGrath will probably play Satur- 
day. Thurlow, Gavin, and Jones, however, 
are the Aggie forwards who saw service 
last year. Although we cannot prove by 
this fact along that the Aggie line is 
superior, it has made a much better 
showing so far than the Medford for- 
wards. Neither line is very heavy al- 
though the advantage may be somewhat 
in favor of M.A.C. 

Captain George Perry and Hal McDon- 
nell, two veteran backs, should be watched 
but "Red" Sullivan and "Buddy" Moberg 
of the Aggies have the ability to show 
them up. "Eddie" Haertl, who did such 
a good job against Lowell last week, is 
an additional possibility who should not 
be overlooked. 

The record of the two teams to date: 

TUFTS 
Tufts 7, Maine 6 
Norwich 13, Tufts 
Conn. Aggies 3, Tufts 
New Hampshire 9, Tufts 6 
Middlebury 19, Tufts 
Bowdoin It, Tufts 7 

MASS. AGGIE 
Mass. Aggie 19, Bates 
Mass. Aggie 19, Norwich 
Mass. Aggie 13. Conn. Aggie 
Mass. Aggie M, \Y. P. I. 19 
Amherst 27. Mass. Aggie 
Mass, Aggie 41, Lowell Textile 6 



To the Editor 

of the Collegian. 
When Tufts beats us for three coiw. u 
tive seasons what happens? (i-r-r-r-r! 
The boys from Medford are facing the 
inevitable, a fighting team backed by all 
the enthusiasm that an Aggie student 
IkxIv can muster, and supported bj 
ardent alumni from coast to coast. Oat 
team certainly deserves support, too. It 
has made a record this year in which m 
may all take pride. It has contributed 
greatly to the glory of our alma mater. 
We can certainly count on the team. The 
rest of us don't play as significant a part 
as individuals but together we make or 
break the team. Let's make it. Let's 
send this Tufts game down to history • 
letters of flaming red. Let's really trim 



R. D. Hawley'W 



SEVEN REGULARS TO PLAY 

(Continued from Page 1) 
snapperback. He is one of the few men 
who has a lot to say and that knows what 
he is talking about. 

"Tiny" Thurlow was rated as one of 
the best guards in New England small 
colleges last year. He came here with no 
grid experience but he played freshman 
football and then varsity. He has play* 
regularly for two years and it was through 
no lack of ability that he did not play 
varsity for the third season. Few gam* 
are made through his portion of the la* 
It is a pleasure to watch him open hole* 
for the Agates and fill up holes when <* 
the defense. 

"Fat" Gavin is the biggest and heaviest 
man on the eleven. He started grid work 
at Natick High and he has been as g<*» 
an advertisement for Natick athletics * 
"Hubba" Collins could want. Iaj**j 
have kept him from several games m ftf' 
seasons but he has played regularly a" 
consistently this fall. . . 

Tulenko reported this fall for the ■• 
time. He has shown much ability as 
lineman although he has been replay 
occasionally by Black. These eight n* 
and Nichols, Fessenden, and Smith •» 
graduate next spring M.A.C. will m ^ 
them but they have certainly done mo 
than their bit for M.A.C. 




Hickey- Freeman have the knack of tailoring comfort and style and enduring good 
looks into every suit, topcoat and overcoat they make. " Always Consult Tom", for 
the better things to wear. 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 




FLOWER SHOW ATTRACTS 

Continued from page 1) 

ture w.i> tin- uni«pic exhibition of the 
typical Japanese method of displaying 
Mowers. This exhibition was arranged 1>\ 
Earle \\ . Bruorton '2<i, Alvah YY. Jones 
18 and K. Tamada, a social student. 
This display is to Ik- duplicated as a 
window display in a Northampton florist 
shop. There were also many other dis 
plays l>\ commercial florists which were 
not included in any of the competitions. 
A large silver cup, the gift of Miss lie-lie 
Skinner of llolyokc, was awarded to 
Daniel J. Connor, gardener at Mt. 
lloKnke CoHagS, for the Ust twclw 
blooms of one variety of chrysanthemums. 
Mr. Connor lanu third in the com|tctition 
last year. This i up is awarded annually 
and is to be held |x-rniaut ntly when it 
h.i^ been won three years in succession 
or a total ot live year* by the same in 

dividual. The competition has been |oing 

on for tea years. The- judges ol this 
OOmpttitietl were Mr. W. N. Craig ol 
Weymouth, Secretary of the Hoston 
Gardeners' and Florists' Club; Mr. Waltci 
Colby of South Weymouth, President of 
the same club, and Mr. JsOSSf Wheeler 
of Natick, President of the Aimiitan 

( amation So ci e ty . 

In addition lo this competition there 
were three student Competitions, the 

winner* of which wen- swarded as follow-: 

I or the best table arrangement s. Open to 

four-year commercial floriculture mu 

dents: K. Tamada, .1 special student; 
■CCOOd, \lvah YY. Joins 1'li of Salisbury; 

third, George II. Thurlow *98 of West 

Newbury, l-or the Inst basket arrange 
nunts. open to four-year greenhouse 
management students: first, Herman K. 

Pickens '27 of Stoaeham; second, Charlea 
P. Read '20 of West Bridgewater; third, 

Harry C. Nottebaert '27 of Lexington. 

I or the best vast <>i bowl arrangements 

open to two-year commenial floriculture 
students: first, Miss Kdith ( Smith 
2yr*28 of Wakefield; second. Philip II. 
Parsons 2\ r'2»i of Manchester; third, 
Frank F. Dillon 2yr'2»i of New Bedford. 
The student exhibits were judged bv A. 
B. Butler of Northampton, C II. Sinclair 
of Holyoke and (.. W. Thornilcy ol 
Northampton, all of them being kiiii 
nurcial florists. 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUNSINGWEAR and NEDALIA 
SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $1.39 $1.75 
G. Edward Fisher 
TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 8325 

ShoesThat-Will- Wear 

At Price* That Are Fair 

HOSIERY AND RUBBER 
FOOTWEAR 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 

S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 

Ocultiita Prescription* Filled. Broken lente* 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
* reliable make* 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

It's not too early to think of Xmas. 
We carry a full line of Wright & Ditson 
Sporting Gflssia. Come In and see them 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMIIKKST RANK 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 



IS AT 



DRURY'S 

College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



TJt* QfiicaJUL 



THANKSGIVING 

■\ Greeting Cards .'. 

PUCE CARD and TALLIES 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



Ask for 



NEW 
HANDY PACK 

WRIGLEYS 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

incorpora re I) 
275 High St. Holyoke 

s h oes 

— ANI> 

H O S I E R V 

of Quality and Fashion for 
M. A. C. Students 

Harry B. Herman, 1920 




MM 

tor Your Money 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

TOILET N E E D S 
TOOTH BRUSHES - DENTIFRICES RAZORS 

BLADES TALCUMS LOTIONS 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 



The Slickest Coat on the Campus ! 

■ c • v a •** e«* *» 



tftccM 

No well dressed college man is 
without one. It's the original, 
correct slicker and there'i noth- 
ing as smart or sensible for 
rough weather and chilly days. 

Made of famous yellow water* 
proof oiled fabric. Has all* 
'round strap on collar and si— 
tic at wrist-bands. 

Clasp-closing style 

Button-closing style 

Stamp the correct name in your 
memory, and buy no other. 
The "Standard Student" is 
mads only by the Standard 
Oiled Clothing Co., N. Y. C 

J%M*St aHaslaS AM 

•Psla^r VW Vsw 

ALL GO D 
O 




Everything 

the new 
student needs 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

IN THE M BUILDING 



Pens 
Paper Suppl 
Stationery 



SING LEE HAND LAUND«Y 

No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mass 

Our Laundry First CUas 

Our Poller Guarantees' 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OP 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite Post Ofllce 




TO THE INFORMAL . . . 

But, you must keep warm at the game in order to enjoy yourself afterward. Also when you slip out of that 
warm BOLTER OVERCOAT remember that most every girl admires well dressed men. 

Amherst CARL H. BOLTER Hyanni. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, NOV. 18, 1925 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Tucs. 

Wed. 

Thurs. 

).N, 
7.J0 



Friday 

3.00 
6.45, 8.30 



Cecil DeMllle's greatest 

riniWII picture, "THE 

TEN COMMANDMENTS" 

(10 reeln.. Bstetts Taylor. 
Julia Kayo. Richard l>U. I <■• 
utrlce Joy. Neia \aldl and 
Agnes Ayres. The outstand- 
ing picture of l'»2V 

Ntwi rabies 1 omedy 
Matinees Prices Kvenlngs 
Children 2*c Floor SOc 

AdulU SOc llalcony 75c 



Saturday 

3 00. S 45 
1.30 



Mon. 

3.00, 6.45 
8.30 



Harold l.loyd and Jobyna 
KalMon In "<;IRI. SHY". 
Nml ti> "The r're»hman," 
i his lit the best comedy dra- 
ma Lloyd nan made. 
Sportllght Pathe Comedy 
Regular prices 



A full supply of ... . Fraternity and College Banners, Pennants, and Stationery 

WE WILL BE GLAD TO SHOW VOU OUR STOCK 



YE AGGIE INN 



Madge Helium) . Paul Panzer 
Z.i/U- I'M is and Alec H. Fran- 
cis in 

'• THLNDKR MOUNTAIN " 
from John (iolden's play hit 
"Howdy Folks", ■ thrilling 
story of the Kentucky hills. 
News Educational tkimedy 



Betty Bronson, Nell Ham- 
ilton, Rocklitfe Fellowes and 
Phyllis Haven In 

"THE GOLDEN PRINCESS" 

a western melodrama of the 
California gold rush in '49. 
Pa the Review Pathe Comedy 



BOSTON GARDENERS AND 

FLORISTS VISIT CAMPUS 

AbOttl 80 members of the Boston 
< iutteaere' and Florists' Club were on the 
campus last Thursday tor their annual 
field day. This is the first time for over 
18 years that the club has visited the 
cunpm i" ■ body. After lunch in Draper 
Hall the members adjourned to F rem h 
Hall for a short meeting Addresses of 
welcome »«« made by President Edward 
If. Lewis ami I'rolessor frank A. W'augh. 
The reepOOM for the club was made by 

Mr. Waiter Golby, Praeldwrt oi the Club. 

Director Haskell Rave ■ short talk on 
'What the ExperimeOl Station Might 
Do for the FJorMt." After a few brie f 

ipecches the member* mad* a tour <>. 
inspection of the campus and greenhouses 



FACULTY NOTES 

A son, Harold Kdward, was born to 
Professor and Mrs. Richard T. Muller 
last Wednesday, Noveml er 11. 



A son. Hugh Salisbury, was born to 
Professor and Mrs. Orton L. (lark on 
Saturday last. November 14. 



Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the best in everything 



COLLEGE SHOES 

— AT — 

TOWN PRICES 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



IT'S NONE TOO EARLY- 

to think about what you are going to 
wear to the Tufts game and to the in- 
formal. 



• • 



NORTHAMPTON 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

Paul Hansell, Manager 

Week November 16 

The Northampton Repertory Company 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



— IN- 



ii 



THE MOLLUSC" 



BY 

H. H. DAVIES 



Evenings at 8.15 Sat. Mat. at 2.15 

Prices: 50c. to $1.10. (including tax) 

Phone 435 



Our stocks are now at their best, plenty 
of Suits, Overcoats, Sheepskins and 
Dogskin coats. As usual you can look 
a little better and spend less money by 
giving us a look. 



NextWeek: 'THE LITTLE MINISTER" 
By J. M. BARK. IK 



CHILTON PEN 

Demonstration this week 

Holds TWICE as much ink as other self-filling pens of equal 
size— writes TWICE as long. Come in and see. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Wait 

NEW PRICES 

Mens Whole Sotes. Rubber Heels - - • »J-» 

Mens Half Soles. Rubber Hee s - - - 1-75 

Mens Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels • - * *> 

Mens Half Soles *«*■ 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOUSE 
Open till 8 P. M. 




You will Bnd an eicellant 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP . . . 
equipped with the most up-to-date Goodyear 
Machinery and a modern 
SHOE SHINING PARLOR 
at Hi Amlty-SU, - Labrovltz Block 

We understand your requirements and are pre- 
pared to meet your needs. 
A U work guaranteed. Shoes shined and dyed 

VINCENT GRANDONICO, Prop. 



F. M. Thompson & Son 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST & DEACON. Prop*. 




Everything's jake 
when you 
smoke P. A. 



9> 



FRESHMEN SOPHOMORES JUNIORS SENIORS ATHLETES 

Do You Know? 
"HOW TO STUDY" 

The Students' Hand -Hook of Practical Hints on the Technique of 

Effective Study 
by WILLIAM ALLAN BROOKS 
A GUIDE containing hundreds of practical hints and short cuts in the 
economy of learning, to assist students in securing MAXIMUM SCHOLASTIC 
RESULTS at a minimum cost of time, energy, and fatigue. 

ESPECIALLY RECOMMENDED for overworked students and athletes 

engaged in extra cuniculum activities and for average and honor students who 
are working for high scholastic achievement. 

Some of the Topics covered 



Scientific Shortcuts in Effective 

Study. 
Preparing for Examinations. 
Writing Good Examinations. 
Brain and Digestion In Relation 

to Study. 
How to Take Lecture and Reading 

Notes. 
Advantages and Disadvantages of 

Cramming. 



Diet During Athletic Training. 
How to Study Modern Languages. 
How to Study Science. Literature, 

etc. 
Why Go to College? 
After College. What? 
Developing Concentration and 

Efficiency. 
The Athlete and His Studies, 
etc., etc., etc., etc., etc., etc. 



Why You Need This Guide 

"It U safe to say that failure to guide and direct study is the weak point in 
the whole educational machine. Prof. G. M. Whipple, University oi Michigan. 

"The successful men in college do not seem to be very happy. Most of them, 
especially the athletes are overworked." Prof. H. S. Canby. Yale. 

"Misdirected labor, though honest and well intentioned may lead to naught. 
Among the most important things for the student to learn is how to study. With- 
out knowledge of this his labor may be largely in vain." Prof. G. F. Swain. M. I. T . 

"To students who have never learnt "How to Study, "work is very often a 
chastisement, a flagellation, and an insuperable obstacle to contentment." Prof. 
A. Inglis, Harvard. 

"HOW TO STUDY" will show you how to avoid all misdirected effort. 

Get a good start and make this year a highly successful one by sending 
for this hand-t>ook and guide NOW. 

You Need This Intelligent Assistance 






CLIP] 
AND MAIL 

TODAY 



American Student Puivtisheis. 
22 West 43rd St. New YorV. 

Gent lessen: 

Please send me a ropy of "How to Study' for 
which 1 enclose $1 .00 can, 11.10 check. 

Name 

Address 



TROUBLE'S a bubble, just as the song says. 
And you can stick it with the stem of your old 
jimmy-pipe, filled to the brim with good old 
Prince Albert. A remedy? It's a specific! Ask 
any jimmy-piper who ever butted into trouble. 
Cool as the zone-of-kelvination you read 
about in the refrigerator ads. Sweet as the kiss 
of spring on a winter-weary brow. Fragrant as 
locust blossoms. Soothing as a cradle-song. 
And — P. A. can't bite your tongue or parch 
your throat. The Prince Albert process fixes thatl 
Get on the sunny side of life with a jimmy- 
pipe and P. A. Tie a tidy red tin to trouble. 
Smoke the one tobacco that's got everything 
you ever wished for — Prince Albert. Quicker 
you get going, the sooner your worries will be 
over. Men who thought they never could smoke 
a pipe are now P. A, fans. You'll be a cheer- 
leader too! 

FRINGE ALBERT 

— no other tobacco is like it! 



i$ told everywhere in 

Yound and half- 



P. A. 

tidy red lint, found .- 

pound tin humtdort, and 
pound eryiUl-gten humtdort 
with tponse~ntoittener top. 
And etwoyt with every bit of 
bite and perch removed by the 
Prince Albert procett. 




Look el the U. S. revenue 

sump — there ere TWO full 

•unci j in every tin. 



© 1925. R. J. Reynold Tohneco 
Company. Wlnston-Sulem. N. C. 



While Beating Tufts — 



You'll enjoy yourself if you know that you can go 



to the INFORMAL LOOKING YOUR BEST IN A SUIT bearing the label of 

SOUTH WICK BROS. & GAUL? 



Sto jWagMrintHPttg (EoUfrngn 



Vol. XXXVI. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, DEC. 2, 1925 



No. 9 



EXAMINATION 

SCHEDULE 



Monday. I>ec. 14 
7.Ml- Q .50 a. m. 



Frew h 4 

\sliley 
:i 4 

Mr Keller 

l, ,,■ man I 
Pr>.t Julian 



10-12 



Monday, 

( ht in 1 
i hem I 

<_ In-ill -•*> 

Monday, 2 
Ess 85 

i ii.-iii *il 

1-IoM DO 

Tuenday, 
7 .SO-9.50 

.n -1 
Ei Soi 35 
French SB 

h 28 

,n 25 

! 53 
Dairy 50 
Ec s« .'-0 
Bag W 
In! 54 
Ag Ec 77 

Tuesday, 2-4 p. m. 

German 1 VI G 2H 

\n I lu* 25 12 

Em 38 IV 



MB B 
HI II 

G Aud 

114 

110 

a. in. 

(II A 

G Aud 

G 26 



4 p. m. 

Aud 

G26 

FH H 

Dec. IS 
a. m. 
G 2X 

FH F 

MB B 

FH D 

G28 

102 
FL M 
FH F 

114 
EB K 

HI 



Micro 30 
An Ed 05 
An HlU 00 

Clu'in 51 
Flori 53 
Hist & Gov 50 
(hem HO 
Land Gard 75 
\>b Gard 75 



M » 
111 
108 

g n 

FH D 

FH F 

( , 36 

\VH IS 

FH D 

EBG 

317 

CII K 

G 2h 

WH | 
11 

IX M 
111 

EB II 



Zool 50 
An Ed so 
Bot 75 
Che m 75 

Pom 50 
A K Ec83 
Hon MIk* 70 
Kur Eng 75 

Ent 76 
Land Gard 79 WH B. A 
Poult 75 110 

Vet 75 VL B 

Tuesday. 10-12 a. m. 
Math 1 

Prof. Moote 

III B, D. G 
Mr. Shumway 

FH F. H 
Physics 25 

(HA. EB D 



Anton 



SO 



110 



Wednesday, Dec. 16 

7.^0-9.50 a. m. 
Amu 1 G 26. 28. Aud 
Al 1-. M HI 

d 51 113.114 

French 50 FH D 

German 10 I HO 

Wed. 10-12 a. ni. 
BM 35 CH A. EB D 

Agr'.n 70 HI 

EB K 



Wed. 2-4 p. 
Fieach 4 111. V 
German I IV 

as ii 

Esj 38 V 

Hot 61 



m. 

t II A 

( ; as 

114 

111 

( II E 



Thursday, Dec. 17 
7.50-9.50 u. m. 



Mil I 
Kill 
Mil 35 
K.H.I 
Ebi 50 



CH A 

110 

G Aud 

102 

114 



Micro 50 
Ent 52 
French 75 
Poult 76 

Hort 50 
Math 50 
Micro 60 
Ag Ed BO 
Farm Mgt 76 
Math 76 
Pom 77 

Land Gard 50 
Land (lard 76 
Vet 78 

German 50 II 
Poult 50 
Ag Ec 79 
An Hus 75 
Flori 75 
Pom 75 

Mil 50 
Pub Sr.k 00 
Spanish 00 
An Ed 76 
Math 7.". 
Mil 75 

1-nt ■ 
Forestry .V> 

Dairy 75 
German 75 



M 28 
EB K 
FH H 

312 



FH F 
MB B 

M 28 

317 

102 

MB D 

VVH B 

WH B 

WH A 
VL A 

( ■ lit; 

312 
M ■ B 

316 

I- II C 

WH A 

MB I) 
HI 
FH F 
317 
MB B 
M B G 

EB D 

FH II 
II. 

(, as 



Thursday. 10-12a. m. 

Germ G 38 

FH F 

Km 50 EB K. 

Thursday , l-.l p. m. 
b28 I. III. VI 

rri.lav. DM. 18 
7.S0-4.50 a. m. 
ish 1 

PattsfsM 114 

■) arrangement 

I)\i«ini: 35 
Bot ■"■<» 

50 
K II Lit. SO 

Ml 

Note 

ours Scheduled lor examination may not 

Rule ImkiU. sect. VII, 1). In case of 

i conrln 1 lictween I repeat and all atlvam ad. course, 

ranced course examination i^ to lie taken 

M scheduled anil arrangement made with the 

i in charge ot the rtpeal cottst Isj the 
ition in that subject. 



in, 111. 110 

Prof. Prince 110. Ill 
fnt. Kami 102 

Mr. Jackson G 26, 28 

Bot 7S 
Get HUM 78 

Micro. M, 82 
l'om M) 

R 11. Lite 76. 81 
Spanish 75 
Zool 75 



The Kxunsion Service has nade 
arrangemesti with .st.itimi VYBX in Spring- 
ticM, (or tbe brossdeastng of agricultural 
infiirni.it ion service, beginning the middle 
oi December. At about tbe same time, 
organized agricultural courses will lie 
broadcasted from station WTAG in 
Worcester. 



Nol long ago eight students from Conn, 
Agricultural College who are majoring in 
' -n.- \i>itc«l the campus and wert 
the host of the senior members of Flori- 
culture at a dinner at Draper Hall. They 
iccompanied by Profeoaor Roland 

" Patch, an alumnus of M.A.C. in the 

- "I "11. 



MARX 26 INJURED 
Herbert M.irx "I2(i, was recent ly seriously 
haraed when a tank of hot oil exploded at 
the Prot tor A ( iambic works of Cincinnati, 
'hio. J our f his associates were killed. 
Wart was captain of the 1924 football 
'tarn. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Thursday — 
••45 p. m. Assembly. Speaker, 
Mr. Royal B. Farnum, Principal 
Normal Art School, Boston. 

Friday— 

' !' m. Social Union Entertain- 
ment. Orpheus Club of Spring- 
'•' Id, accompanied by violin solo- 

'nt«T. -lass basketball. '29 vs. 2-Vr. 
I '27 vs. "28. 
•Sunday— 

' ! " i. m. Sunday Chapel. Speaker, 

Rev, K-lwin B. Robinson, Grace 

itional Church, Holvoke. 
1 "esday— 

i' to. Interclass basketball. 
V*. '89 and '27 vs. 2-Vr. 



BOTH FLOORS USED 
FOR TUFTS INFORMAL 



Over a Hundred Couples Attend 
Brilliant Social Affair. 



"The largest and best informal in 
ycam" is the general opinion of the in- 
formal which was held after the Tufts 
game. More than one hundred couples, 
raised to the highest spirits by a wonder- 
ful day and a thrilling, victorious game, 
took part in making this informal one of 
the biggest events of the year. Both 
floors of the Memorial Building were used, 
the music being furnished by two orches- 
tras: The Hollywood Sextet of Spring- 
field, and Grayson's Pasadena Five. 

The girls from Mt. Holyoke College 
were chaperoned by Miss Crane and Miss 
Stinchfield. The local chaperones wen- 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold M. ( "Kid") Gore 
and Mr. and Mrs. George Cotton. 

At six-thirty the dancers adjourned to 
Draper Hall for the usual excellent in- 
formal dinner. On their return to the 
Memorial Building they were greeted by 
the startling spectacle of a huge victory 
fire which the enthusiastic frosh had built 
in the center of the field between the Drill 
Hall and South College. 

The committee had the pleasure of 
entertaining a few couples from Tufts 
who were convinced when the evening had 
ended, that we were able to show them a 
lively social function as well as a good 
football game. 



Poultry Show Held 

In Stockbridge Hall 

Many Prizes Awarded in Ninth 
Annual Exhibition. 



The Ninth Annual Poultry Show, held 
in Stockbridge Hall on November 2.'{ and 
24, was a sun ess in every way. Ent tie-- 
were received from all parts of the state, 
and the attendance on both days was 
excellent. 

Mr. A. P. Went worth of Winthrc;) 
acted as judge, and awarded the prizes 
as follows: 

Two Year Vocational 

Students, M.A.C. Students, M.A.C. 

Large Roasters 

1. C. A. I •". Blood 1. R. H. Haywood 

2. A. A. Nash 2. K. Find 

li. R. L. Nutter S. J. G. Lewis 

4. F. W. Putnam 4. \\ . W. Ford 

Capons 

1. R. L. Ntttter 1. J. G. Lewis 

2. L. N. Humphrey 2. R. II. Haywood 

3. R. K. Weal 8. K. Lied 

4. Helen Wood 4. YV. W. Ford 

Brown E&gs 

1. S. Trueboa 1. J. < '•. Lewis 

2. R. F. Johnson 2. E. Find 

3. E. H. Alcott 3. R. II. Haywood 

4. C. A. F. Blood 4. \V. W. lord 

White Eggs 

1. E. Find 

2. J. G. Lewis 

3. W. W. lord 

4. R. H. Haywood 

Farmers and Commercial Poultrymen 
Capons 

1. Prison Camp and Hospital, West Rut- 

land, Mass. 

2. Homer N. Damon, Enfield, Mass. 

Turkeys 
1. Charlescote Farm, Sherborn, Mass. 

Ducks 
1. Weber Duck Farm, Pondville, Mass. 

Boys' and Girls' Clubs 
Small Roasters 

1. J. Byron, Hopkins Academy, Hadley 

2. J. Smith, W. Westport 

3. Howe Brothers, No. Amherst 

4. C. Klunoski, Hopkins Acad., Hadley 

Large Roasters 

1. Howe Brothers, No. Amherst 

2. Howe Brothers, No. Amherst 

3. Howe Brothers, No. Amherst 

4. H. Saddlowski, Hopkins Acad., Hadley 

Capons 
1. Howe Brothers. No. Amherst 
_'. Howe Brothers. No. Amherst 

Fryers 
1. John Byron, Hopkins Acad., Hadley 
3. C. Klunoski, Hopkins Acad., Hadley 

Fowl 
3. E. Baj. Hopkins Academy, Hadley 

Brown Eggs 
1. H. Hkrat 
3. Howe Brother-. 

(Continued on Pafte 2) 



Male Chorus 

To Sing Here 

Orpheus Club of Springfield to Open 
Social Union Program this Friday. 



The first Social Cnion entertainment ol 
the year will be held in Bowker Audi- 
torium, Friday, December 4th at 7 p. m. 
The Orpheus Club of Springfield has been 
secured for the opening number. This i> 
a male chorus of over one hundred voices. 
The club will be accompanied l>\ a violin 
soloist. Admission to students will be by 
presentation of student activities' tickets. 

The other entertainments of the Social 
Union program are as follows: 

December 12, Saturday, 7 p. m. Aggie 
Revue. A musical comedy to be pre- 
sented by the M.A.C. students. 

January 8, Friday, 7 p. m. De Jen 
Novelty Company. 

January 17, Sunday, 3 p. m. Boston 
Chamber of Music Club from the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra; appearing in 
this series for the third time. 

January 29, Friday, 7 p. m. Edwin If. 
Whitney, Interpreter of Plays. 

February 12, Friday, 7 p. m. Jugo-Slav 
Tamburica Orchestra. 

February 20, Friday, 7 p. m. Glee ( lul> 
Concert by the M.A.C. Musical Clubs, 
assisted by outside talent. 

March 12, Friday, 7 p. in. Peerless 
Quintet of Boston, including Harold S. 
Tripp, Tenor, who has been so en 
thusiastically received will) the Meistet 
singers. 



LARGE MASS MEETING 
BEFORE 1UFTS GAME 



Entire Student Body Present at 
Enthusiastic Gathering. 



The largest mass meeting in the p.t>t 
several years was held in Stockbridge Hall 
Friday, Nov. 20, on the eve of the annual 
football clash with Tufts. Over 7(H) 
students attended as well as all the 

members oi the Varsity itmad. 

Roland Ycrbet k was the first speaker 
on the program. He spoke on the purpose 
of the meeting and stressed the fact that 
the Aggies would Ik- sn, , eSsfaL President 

Edward M. Lewis assured '!"■ Kitted thai 

tbe entire alumni liody was behind the 
team and that the team would surely win. 
The Seniors on tin- squad then spoke 
and put forth their ideas concerning the 
on-coming clash. "Al" GttStafsOfl assured 
the student body that "the little red 111,1 
chine would loop down the field evi 11 
though it lie on the rims." Captain Jones 
said that the team could not help but win 

with so much support and enthusiasm 

anions the undergraduates. 

"Kid" Gore spoke on the values of 
football from an educational is well as 
from a physical point of view. Every able- 
bodied man should be out for some sport 
because an education is worthless if 
gained at the expense of physical develop 
ment. He paid a great tribute to "Al" 
Gustafson for the gnat honors he has 
gained in the classroom as well as in 
athleti< a 

The mass meeting was brought to a 
(lose by "Pop" (lark who spoke on tin- 
purpose of the TT dub. He uncovered 
the motto of the club and revealed the 
words TRIM TUFTS. 



Freshman Football 

Season Finished 



Team Hindered by Injuries and 
Ineligibility. 



The freshman football team played their 
final game against Deerfield Academy on 
November <ith, and now the various num- 
bers of the squad have a lew weeks respite 
in which to recuperate from injuries and 
ineligibility, the bubgears of the present 
season. Although the yearlings lost more- 
games than they won, they captured their 
first contest against Northampton High 
School and their objective game with the 

sophomores. 

Several of the l.est players have been 
ineligible. Johnson, a Worc este r boy who 

has displayed encouraging ability as ,1 
tackle, was low in his studies, as were 
Bowie, Kay, and Nitkiewicz, three promis 
ing candidates for next year's varsity. 
( iptain Mills, center and quarterback for 
the freshmen, played a good game at all 
(Continued on Page i) 



Aggie Gridmen Show Real 

Football in Final Game 

Springfield Wins 18 to 13 in Thanksgiving Day Battle. Day of 

Thrills Climaxed When Maddux and Berry Work 

Sensational Shoestring Game 



NEITHER CLASS WINS 
SIX MAN ROPE PULL 

Rope Divided up fur Souvenirs After 
Three-Minute Struggle. 



The annual sophomore- fresh man six- 
men rope pull, held before the Tufts 
game on November 21, resulted in a tie. 
The competitors were unable to pull 
until a decision was awarded due lo the 
fact that the ro|>e was hastily divided 
among the interested spectators as soon 
as the draw was announced at the end of 
t be alotted three minutes. The sophomore 
team, which was coached by "Boh" 
White '20, included Lane, Bloincpiist, 
("ami, Yoetsch, Marston, and Schap|>elle 
and was managed by Wilcox. The yearl 
ing stpiail, managed by Nichols, was made 
up of the following men: I lenient s, 
Johnson, Nickerson, Walkden, (hapin, 
Davis "I. arty" Barney '27 helped lo 
organize the team. 



FOUR AGGIE H00PMEN 

WIN RECOGNITION 

Temple, Partenheimer, Samuels and 
Smiley (>iven All-New England Honor. 



Basketball practice at M.A.C. has been 
carried on for the last few weeks under (In- 
direction of Captain "Johnny" Temple ol 
Shelliurnc Kails. Although several mem- 
bers of last year's v.itsitv team, including 
"l.arry" Jones and "Al" GttStsJsoo have 
been occupied with football, the largest 
sipi.nl ever to report, more than thirty 
strong, has Been prat tiring twice a week. 
"Johnny" Temple and "Merry" Pstftca 
hcitner in the forward court and "Kay" 
Smiley at guard are the outstanding per- 
formers among the many aspirants for tin- 

v.ilsity. 

Temple, w ho scored a grand total of 1 IK 
points last year, and I'.n tenheimer, who 
ran tip 112 counters, were both named on 
the All New England Collegiate basket- 
ball ii-am which reeently appeared in the 
latest edition df Spalding's < rffit ial Basket 
ball Guide. In addition, "Sammy" 
Samuels, captain of last year's quintet was 

picked as a forward on the second team, 
and "K.iv" Smiley and "l.arry" Jones 

received honorable mention. This is the 

first lime that Aggie b.is place more than 
one man on i lie All- New England quintet, 
and the fad that four of the candidates 

for the l'.»2d team received at le,:st 
honorable mention augurs well for t In- 
coming season. 

A glanee at the schedule, whirh is 
practically complete, should remove any 

Overconfident ' in regard to the appro.n Ii 
ing season, however, for the list of OpSOS 

euis includes ■ majority of the strongest 

teams in New England outside of the 
East Intercollegiate League. Harvard .Hid 

Dartmouth do not dash with M.A.C as 

they did last Spring, but in their places, 
Vermont and Holy Cross, boasting two of 
the Ik-si quintets in New England, will 

oppose the Aggies here at M.A.C. The 
large number of home games makes the 

schedule particularly attractive, end the 

seating accommodations available at the 
drill hall arc likely to be taxed to their 
utmost. The schedule follows: 
Jan. 7 — Norwich et M.A.C. 
0— W.P.I, at Worcester 

1 6 — B rown at M.A.C. 
20— Wesseyan at M.A.t 

Clark at Worcester 

27 — 0|>en 

88 Mew Hampshire at M.A.C. 
Feb. 8 Holy Cross at M.A.C 

10— Williams at Williamstown 

i:; Middlebury at M.A.C . 

17 Springfield at MAC 

20— Vermont at M.A.C. 

22 — Conn. Aggies at Hartford 
Mar. .'I— Tufts at Medford 



CLASS BASKETBALL 
The initial games in the interclass 
basketball scries wen- played on Nov. 21. 

The sophomores triumphed over the 
Continued on Page 2) 



A lighting eleven from M.A.C. held the 
highly reputed Springlield team to a 
score ol IS to l.'l after the Springfield 
men had trailed for over three periods at 

Pratt Field, Springfield, on Thanskgiving 

Day, Not since the early season games 
has the Aggie offense functioned as it 
did at the V.M.C.A. college. M.A.C. S 
characteristic drive featuring old fashioned 
football soon showed itself. Twice the 
Agates inarched down the field to be 
stopped by the home team but the Red 
(Continued on Page 4) 



CASEY'S JUMBOS 

TAKEN BY AGATES 



M.A.C. Shows Real Football but Uses 
Safety to Stop Tufts' Inspired Charge. 



M.A.C. out scored the Tufts gridmen, 
t> to 4, on Alumni field in their next to 
the last game, the closest contest that has 

bee ii played on the home gridiron this fall. 

Tufts i atne to Amherst with the odds 
decidedly against them, largely because of 
the much better record of the Agales. 
Although the MAC. men are lighter and 
not p.ulie iil.nlv last, lli.ii record was so 
much supcrioi to that of the Brown and 
Blue that there was little ho|>e of victory 
among the Tufts motets before the game. 
Superior condition, team WOTst, and lots 

of fight have played important roles in all 

the Aggie games this year. Thev were very 
much in evidence against the Medfordites. 

The Aggie machine started tO luiietioii 
as soon as it received the ball. The 
initial drive brought the play to tin- Tufts 
live- vaol line but a fifteen y.uel penalty at 

ibis point waa too great ■ handicap. The 
Agau-s had five chances to score, al 
from marches featuring straight football 
but only OSkce, in the third cpiarler, was a 
tally |xissible. 

Tufts' first points were made in the 
sec onel period when all Aggie punt was 
bloc keel. The ball lolled across the cud 
/.one and under the ropes before il wis 

captured ami it waa ruled ■ safety. Tufts 

other score came in the final period win n 
Uiiinn was sent in for GustafsOO te> call 

lot a safety. The Agates were directly 

under their own cross-bar on the fourth 
down. The chances of getting a punt ofT 
sal. lv without hilling the goal posts were 

slight. This bit of strategy probably saved 

the game for the home team. Several 

writers, however, have given the credit 
of the victory entirely to the- author of 
this ruse. But without the offensive drive 
and tbe defensive light of the whole A. 
machine then- would have been no lead 
of which to take advantage. 

It is hard to pick stars in this game. 

Captain Larry Jones, Thurlow, Gavin, 

and Couhig, playing their last game- on 

Alumni Field, all did much to make 

possible- the high-grade Aggie- line work. 

Sullivan and Moberg advanced the ball 
many yards with and without interference 

and < i list, 1 1 sen, although somewhat hamli- 

capped by a had knee, played his usual 

hard and c-ffe e live defensive gane-. 

The summary: 

M.A.C. TUFTS 

Cook, le re, Mi I lonncll 
( savin, Ii rt, Hanson 

I ulenko, Ig rg, Spofford 

Couhig, c < , True 

Thurlow, tg Ig, Brown 

Aiiisteiti, rt It, Nussbeam 

Jones, re le, Bolger 

Gustafson, qb qb, Berry 

Sullivan, Ihb rhb, Clabault 

Moberg, rhb lhb. S< htoeder 
Hilyard, fb fb, Marshall 

Scon- by period s : 1 2 .'{ 1 Ttl. 

MAC 6 0— 

Tufts 'i I ti a i 

Touchdown — Sullivan. Safety — Ouinn, 
Hansen, Referee J. Keasea of Pitts- 
field. Umpire, W. M. Fraaer of Cosby. 
Head linesman -I Shea of B.C. Time — 

lo minute periods. Substitutions: M.A. 
C. — Haertl for Moberg, Moberg for Cook, 
Smith for Moberg, Ric hardson for Smith, 
Cook for Richardson, Moberg for Haertl, 
Haertl for Moberg, Moberg for Cook, 
Quinn for Gustafson, Marx for Amstein, 
(Continued on Page 3) 









THE MASSACHUSE TTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNE SDAY, DEC. 2, 1925 

-^ ^^ — * — — — — — 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. DEC. 2. !«25 






«' 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OK EDITORS 
Mary T. Boyd '26 Editor-in-Chief 

Jqhn F. Lamhkkt '26 



ManagiM Editor 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial 
Cider Pre»i 
Athletlci 



Campus News 



Co-Ed News 
Faculty News 



give* us, is our reason why there are no 
more class sinus. Our interests an 
diffused, by (lasses, and newspapers, 
aim\ radios, and all the thousand other 

agencies of our information. 

If the class sings were spontaneous, 
they might still survive, although it is 
doubtful if many of us would more than 
mire give up our personal interests in 
order to attend such Miigs. But sings, to 

be successful, entail practice, and practice 
entails the expenditure of time. There 

U the Chief factor in the abolishment of 

class singing. Time, especially at Com- 
mencement time, when we are in a hurry 
to get home off get a job off what not, is 




r~ 



AT THE ABBEY 



1'KANCI'S C. statlCS -7 

Eknkst l. Brsstcm 18 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Alyin G. Stevens 26 Business Manager 

Edw.n A. Vviu»ek'28 Advertising Manager 

Lewis H. Wiiitakkr '27 Circulation Manager 

John E. White '27 

Douglas W. LnaSSfl '2K 

Oiaku.s !■. ( i.A(.«; '27 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Maky T. Boyd '20 
Makv T. Boyd '-'•> 
William L. DOU W 
Harold L Clark '28 
Raymond E. Difley '27 
l-.iiswokin Barnard "2k ... m 

joasntnta Pakssu '2k I worth psora to us away than here, and we 

a.v not willing It. spend our time in what 

is, to us, an artificially stimulated enter- 
prise. 

We are still singing as much as ever— 
whenever we get together in groups, al 

plav, and often at work. We often sing 
College songs, but the singing has be 
(dine again informal. W'e realize, as Mr. 
Allen tells us in his interesting communi- 
cation, that music has a lifting power. 
Musk is a rial factor in our lives, but our 
mode of expression is different from that 
of the time when the class sings came into 
being. We express Ourselves informally, 

or— often— vicariously. It is unfortunate 

that it is so, lor the cUsi sings an a 

picturesque adjunct to the t ommi nce- 

mh nt ceremonies, but WC are not to blame. 

We, like our lathers, art moulded by our 
environment, and our environment is not 

theirs. 

If asymM has a remedy Xo suggest, the 
Students are willing to co-operate. We 
appreciate the interest taken in us by the 
alumni, ami we should like to make it 
plain to them that we are not wilfully 
destroying cherished college tradition- 
but that we are forced, under present 
conditions, to discontinue them for a 
little while. 



"Yes, We Are—" 

The Rolls-Royce and the Cadillac 
Are simply motor cats; 

They cost a lot of money 

But remain remote as stars. 
But I flivver bent and battered 

Topless, springless as may be — 
And marked down to fifty dollars, that 

lias personality! 

CP 



Fniered as second-class matter at U><- Ainli.-tst 

vStomL a, , .-,.«.-.. .... -"in, •!,v ,H N';r,. 

of portage provided to In lection 1108. Act of IX 

toiler. 1917 authorized August JO. 1918. 



More About Tolerance 

Our watchword this year culls to our 
attention the necessity of tolerance. That 
this same tolerance is a vital ncce-ilx of 

the day is forcibly brought home to as in 
Hendrih YYillem van boon's new book 
"Tolerance". W'e quote from the review 
in "The Forum": 

"Intolerance, like tolerance, has worn 
manv masks, paraded itself in many forms, 
in each case reflecting the color of the 
time and place, the idiosyncrasy of the 
people who exhibited it. Van Loon 
divides it 'like Caul into three parts: the 
intolerance of laziness, the intolerance of 
ignorance, and the intolerance of self- 
interest'. These three blind beggars are 
always with us, dogging our footsteps 
down the ages. They are but three mani- 
festations of the protective instinct of 
the herd. They exist because the human 
race has been, and still is, dominated by- 
tear. Feaff is at the bottom of all intoler- 
ance. Only the civilized are tolerant— 
they have conquered fear. And though 
we have produced civilized individuals, 
we have not produced a civilized race or 
even a civilized people. We must know 
ourselves for what we are: 'neolithic men 
with cigarettes and lord cars, cliff- 
dwellers who reach their homes with an 
elevator'. In the end man will triumph 
over his own fears; then, and not till 
then, will tolerance win its final victory 
over'intolerance. This 'end' may come in 
ten thousand or in a hundred thousand 

years." 

"To see ourselves as we really are, — 
cruel and bestial, irrational to the point of 
madness, ignorant to a degree that is 
positive rather than negative,— to mea- 
sure and record the slow gains of human- 
ism, rationality, and truth against the 
cruel tyranny of irrational ignorance, to 
point the road we must trudge to a better 
day, and to do these things in language 
that any man may understand"— this is 
what Van boon has done for us in "Toler- 
ance ". 

It would be interesting material for a 
discussion group— this tolerance of "Tol- 
erance". 



The Pessimists Say — 

That the pigskin is rapidly obscuring 

the sheepskin in collegiate circles. 

That our wood supply is steadily de- 
creasing and unless something is done in 
half the time that Congress will take to 
debate the question, even wood alcohol 

will be forbidden to determined seekers 

after acsophagust ical thrills. (You need- 
n't look in the dictionary for that one. 
We invented it.) 

That nowadays the realtors' children 
are being taught addition, distraction and 

subdivision. 

That many an empty attic is covered 

by a "shingle." 

And thai the new "luminaphone", 
which turns light into music should never 
have been turned loose Ml ■ helpless 
public which is already surfeited with 
music that is far too light. 

CP 



The Abbey members of the Y.W'.C.A. 
have been dressing dolls for invalid 

children. 

M 

Under the temporary leadership of 
Evelyn Davis, a girl's orchestra has been 
binned. It is coni|>osed of violin, cornet, 
piano and traps. 

M 

A dance will be held in the Memorial 
Building next Saturday evening, under 
the auspices of the Girls' Glee Club. 

M 

Majel MacMasters *2<> is at her home 
in Ashburnham, recuperating from a 
recent illness. 

M 



COMMUNICATIONS 



Rev. A. Ray Petty, pastor of the Judson 
Memorial Church of Washington Square, 
New York City, will speak at MAC. on 
Wednesday night, December 2nd. On the 
following evening, December 3rd, Dr. 
Henry II. Crane, of Maiden, Mass., will 
deliver a lecture hen. 

M 

Discussion groups for freshmen arc- 
held every Tuesday evening from 7 to 
7.10 p. m. under the auspices of the 
M.A.C. Christian Association. These 
groups are led by upperclassmen, and all 
freshmen who are interested in such dis- 
cussions are invited to attend. 



\Z 



ALUMNI NOTES 



j 



CARPENTER APPOINTED 

EXTENSION SUPERVISOR 



Earle S. Carpenter of Rehoboth, Mass., 
has been appointed Supervisor of Exhibits 
and l-.xtension Courses at M.A.C. Mr. 
Carpenter graduated from this college in 
1»»LM and for the past year has been 
pursuing graduate study at the Iowa 
State College. He will take up his duties 
immediately. 

CLASS BASKETBALL 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

seniors in the first contest, and the 
juniors trampled on the freshmen in the 
second. Reed and Thomas featured for 
P. US, and (i. Thompson starred for the 
seniors. In the nightcap session, C.rithn, 
Murdough, and Merlini shone for the 
winners, while Webber stood out among 
the losers. The scores: 



1928 
Mat (iuire.lf 
Moriarty.lf 
Rccdjf 
Bkamqulst.r 

Mi Kvun.rv: 
Tlmmas.lg.c 
L.Tliompson.lg t) (1 
Kane.lg 



B. F. P. 
1 2 4 
1 2 
6 12 

(i o 



5 10 







1926 B. 

LsBSBSSrW.il 

(iorcn.lR 

Dick.rg 

C.Tliompson.c 2 



Totals IS 2 28 

Referee — Tumcy. 



1927 

Griffin.lf 
Morrill.rf 
MurdoiiKh.e 
Merlini. Ik 
BrigKS.rg 



Totals 



B. F. 
4 
2 

:» o 

2 
1 2 



p-iisen.lf 
Bartlett.rf 



Totals 



1929 

Horan.rg 
Foster ,1k 
Robert son.c 
Cox.c 
Webber jf 
Ranney.lf 



F. P. 





1 1 

4 

1 3 
2 



Referee— Davenport . 



12 2 26 Totals 



4 2 10 



B. F. P. 



1 1 

1 2 

1 I 

2 4 
1 2 

5 1 11 



Taps for TT 

Says one of the club sponsors, "Well, 
now you can tell them what it means — 
Tried and Triumphed." That has to us 
a highly Alger esque connotation— a little 
in the spirit of those immortal works we 
Hand to draw out of the Sunday School 
library if we had been good all week. 
i We sometimes got as many as one a 
month.) Anyway, they were lovely stories 
all about a little boy who bought a bag of 
|h smuts, sold them at a great profit, and 
as a reward for unparalleled financial 
perspicacity was adopted by a rich old 
gentleman. Or else there were boy 
heroes in assorted varieties. "From Rags 
to Riches," "True and Trusty", and so on. 
Our versatile friends in the Athletic 
office, just to prove that these frivolous 
bits of verse are not the exclusive peroga- 
tive of the scribes, contribute this week to 
our column the following requiem, chant 
— or what have you? 

It's All Over Now 

( With apologies to De Wolf Hopper) 
Oh, somewhere in this favored land 

The sun is shining bright. 
The band is playing somewhere 

And somewhere hearts are light, 
And somewhere men are laughing, 

And somewhere children shout, 
But there is no joy in Medford — 

Casey's Tufts have petered out! 

F. S. C. 



Those Class Sings 
Community feeling varies with en- 
vironment. It is true that we do not 
enjoy group singing enough to make any 

sacrifice of time or interest to its develop- 
ment. And why? "Why not?" say our 
critics. "Your lathers did." True, but 
consider the age our fathers lived in — 
consider even so little a past time as 
twenty years, which in view of recent 
developments, is as much a pari age to 
us its one hundred years ago. College 
students of that day had what we have 
got— -leisure! Their transportation was 
not the hectic affair of "collegiate flivvers" 
that ours is. 'Their popular songs lasted 
longer than the brief interval between the 
appearance of new records. Their com- 
munity feeling, which in its local appli- 
cation is college feeling, centered in the 
college and the college institutions. 

Where students before us have gathered 
in groups to express themselves in vocal 
harmonies, we turn on the Victrola, and 
perhaps hum the tune. Our interests are 
not focused on the campus— our whole 
training is toward a world-wide interest. 
Training, the training the college itself 



POULTRY SHOW 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
White Eggs 

1. Henry Randall 

2. lb Wet more 

Sweepstakes in College 

Poultry — J. G. Lewis 
Eggs S. Ti nelson 

Sweepstakes Outside of College 

Poultry — Prison Camp and Hospital, W. 

Rutland. Mass. 
Eggs — Harold Hirst 

The picking contest was won by R. L. 
Nutter, with R. H. Haywood second. 

In the egg-grading contest, L. West was 
first, and T. F. Jonson second. 



'26 I). B. Alexander is employed in 
landscape work with H. S. Wagener of 
Akron, Ohio. The firm is handling some 
luge work in land subdivision, private 
grounds development, cemetery construc- 
tion, and other lines of landscape archi- 
tecture. 

'L'l hliot Goldsmith is employed by 
the General Electric Company at Buffalo. 

'L'."> Milton W. Taylor is working fo ra 
master's degree in Chemistry at the 
University of Iowa. 



CP 

Hakku ! 

No, it's not a sneeze. Neither is it 
what the birdies say when they pop out 
of Swiss clocks and do their song and 
dance act. Hakkus are poems, and the 
Agates write them. To be specific, Prof. 
Waugh's landscape class writes them, and 
they are snappy three line bits of rhythm 
— what you might call dehydrated poems. 
The 1925 crop consisted of hakkus with 
local fevering, and they dealt with all 
possible topics from Assembly snores to 
that bright blue flivver. "You do hakkus" 
said the Prof, and the class hakkued 
lustily — for there was a prize in view — a 
real prize consisting of real Japanese 
hakkus translated by Can Waugh and 
arranged by our own Prof. Rand. 

At great expense the Cider Press has 
secured publication rights to the follow- 
ing gems, of which it must be said that 
the writers Peg-ged away to good purpose 
on their work: 

Hakku No. 1 

This took the cake — pardon us, the book. 

Xight and falling snow 
Caught by the eager branches — 
Morn brings fairyland. 

The second is less esoteric and shows a 
sympathetic understanding of our im- 
mediate scholastic problems. 

Sleeping, nodding heads, 
| Creaking chairs and droning voice — 
Thursday Assembly. 

~~~ CP 



And that's that! 



'21 C. M- Wood who has been the 

leather of fruit growing at the Essex 
County Agricultural School, has been 
granted a leave of absence for the winter, 
which he will spend in Florida. 

'04 J. W. C.regg. Professor and land- 
scape architect of the University of 
California, planned and carried out on 
the University of California campus 
recently an unusual landscape project 
when he transformed a broad terrace on 
the west side of the Administration 
Building into a minature park, using a 
profusion of native material, and in many 
cases transplanting full grown trees to 
give the desired effects. 

'16 Perez Simmons has changed his 
address to 118 Willow Ave., Takoma 

Park, Md. 

*25 Carl E. F. Guterman is working 
for a master's degree in Botany at 
Cornell University. 

•19 Jonathan H. Smith, who gradu- 
ated from the landscape major is now on 
the stage after a year of school teaching 
in New Hampshire. He is in the cast of 
"What Price Glory" at present playing 

in Boston. 

ex-'25 Harold A. Cady of Windsor, 
was married to Miss Clara Odell, of 
Adams, on Sunday, October 18th. 

'17 Letters received from Professor 
Roland W. Rogers give a highly interest- 
ing account of his experiences in assisting 
at the beginning of a new school in 
Albania. His address is, Albanian, 
American School of Agriculture, Kavaje- 

Albania. 

'24 W. C. Frost employed with Warren 
H. Manning, landscape architect of 
Boston, is at present engaged in laying 
out a land subdivision at Raleigh, N. C. 
'16 Stanley W. Hall has been made 
Assistant Chief in the department of 
Floriculture at the University of Illinois. 
'25 Donald E. Ross is connected with 
the plant propagating department of 
A. N. Pierson, Inc. at Cromwell, Conn. 

'25 Roger S. Binner is starting in the 
florist and nursery business in Livingston, 
Montana. 

'25 Samuel L. Woodbury is with the 
Wyomissing Nurseries Co., at Wyonus- 
sing, Pennsylvania. 

21 Frederick Howard is teaching 
science in Mansfield High School. 

'23 Benjamin Gamzue is instructor of 
English at the New York University. 

'19 Ethel Harris is librarian in the 
Beverly, Mass., High School. 

Benjamin F. Wolfe, for two years a 
graduate student in landscape gardening 
at this institution, has gone to the I m- 
versity of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma, 
to teach forestry and landscape gardening. 
'25 Louis Keith and Adrian Barnes 
are with the Park Department in Miami, 

Florida. 

'22 Paul L. Burnett is teaching science 
in the Technical High School at Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island. 

'22 Roger W. Blakely who has been 
the superintendent of a large estate in 
Mousey, N. Y., has just accepted a 
position in the State Agricultural School, 
Randolph, Vermont. 

' 18 Frank J . Binks is with the Rosslyn 
Steel and Cement Company in Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



The COtLBd W is at all times glad to • 
any communications which may Ik- sent to it, bin 
the Kdiiors will assume no responsibility foi 
views expressed, and do not BBGBUSftt) i i, 
such views. 

To the Editor of the Collegian: 

I have seen within the past few month] 
in the Collegia* mention of the I,,-- q| 
active interest in class singing, together 
with the question of whether it is worth 
while, under the circumstances, to try to 
revive interest enough to continue the 
practice. I want to say that I think it 
would be I great mistake not to do 
ber.uise I believe it would be a destrui 
loss to the undergraduates of the coll 
and a serious detraction of our Interest in 
the Commencement exercises and other 
public functions, especially to the alumni, 
but to the general public as well. 

I recall vividly the impression made 
upon my mind when I first heard the i la- 
singing on the evening of a Commeg 
nient season years ago. It carried me back 
to the first years of the college, win n aa 
pioneers used to gather in an entirely in- 
formal and undirected manner and nag 
sii, itdies of such college songs as a* 
might happen to have learned, Off th 
popular songs of the day. The s 
contrast between the old and the new 
custom rendered the latter quite capti- 
vating. It made our early crude practiot 
seem a little ludicrous, but we enjoyed it, 
and it served a good pu rp ose in our body 
days. 

Don't give up the class sings. Then i- 
nothing like group singing to relieve the 
monotony of life and to raise the tirt<! 
spirits of a flagging mind. It is wholly 
elevating, cheering, and ennobling. I 
in fact the over-flow of the well-spring 
of the soul, and furnishes a mental stimu 
lus to achievement, l>oth physically and 
intellectually, and is also an inspiration 
to the listeners. 

Singing has an acceptable and pleasisf 
effect on all occasions where men gather 
and strive together. It has a lifting 
power. Don't give up the class sings. 
Gideon II. Allen 71 



FIRST FACULTY DANCE 

The first of a series of faculty dances 
was held in Memorial Hall recently. 
There were over 21 couples prenat 
in spite- of the several large football 
games which came the following day. 
The dance committee was headed by 
Mr. Clifford J. Fawcett who served as 
chairman. 

There were several feature dtnon 
during the evening but the most intSRSt- 
ing were the football dance and the 
touchdown dance. For the football 
dance there were two goal posts, one at 
either end of the hall decorated with 
the college colors. From the goals hunj 
pennants of other colleges. Prof. Irani 
A. Waugh acted as quarter-back and 
called the signals for the special parts oi 
the dance. 

The touchdown dance was still more 
enjoyable. White tape was stretched 
across the hall about six inches from the 
floor and represented the five yard lines 
of a regular football field. The couples 
danced down the floor, hurdling the tapes 
without moving them for a touchdown. 

The other members of the committee 
who assisted were Mr. George F. Pushes 
and Prof. Charles A. Michels. Dr. and 
Mrs. Hayes were chosen as new members 
of the committee to replace Mr. Fawcett 
who automatically resigned after ssrnsj 
for three dances. 



Mr. R. H. Yerbeck, director of the 
short courses, attended a meeting of the 
Rural Life Committee in W« 
recently, as a representative of the 
Among the topics discussed was the con- 
sideration of the renewal of the Ru" 
Pastor's Conference for short con; 
M.A.C. The last Pastor's Con: 
was held here in 1923, and will be re 
this year if the opportunity is favorable. 

"23 Frank S. Luddington is ' 
manual training and coaching at j|~* 
in the High School at Proctor, Vera** 

'23 Alan Heath is principal of I l 
High School at Stowe, Yermont. 

•2.") Herbert Marx is a chem 
the Proctor and Gamble Co., Cincinatt' 
Ohio. 

'25 Frederick Zwisler is beating 
way around the world. 
'36 Dominick DeVito is a salesman 
the Ocean Oil Co., of Philadelphia. 

'28 George Wendell has been fo fCed 
to leave college because of ill health. 




KNOX HATS .\ BURBERRY COVTS 

Scheyer and Hickey-Freeman Clothes. A. G. Spalding Athletic Goods. White- 
house and Hardy Shoes .'. Cleaning - - Pressing - - Repairing - - Dry Cleaning 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
The best in Drug Store Service 
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AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



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LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, M^SS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



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BOSTONIANC 
1 Shoes for Men Kj 




A REAL COLLEGE SHOE 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 
(Continued from Page ' 

timet, lii Brackley, Cox, .m.l Foster, 
"Ed" Tumey developed three good fool 
lull pleyeri Iron men who tied sever 
engaged in the sport before coming to 
M.A.C. McKittrick, v/ho erne injured in 
mideeaeon, end Kreinbeum, a dependable 
guard, are two candidate! who will als > 
be beard from m \t year. An odd co 
I nc id en ce is the lad thai Mills, \|. 

Kit t rick. Kay, and Crowley all came from 

Jamaica Plain. 

To Coach "Ed" Tume) goea all <lu«- 
credit for his success in developing a loot 
I). ill team while laboring under the handi- 
cap oi having manv <>i his beat nun either 
ineligible off on crutches. 



CASEY'S JUMBOS 
(Continued from I'ufte I) 

Mulhera lor Couhig, Black for Tulenko. 
Tufta— McGrath for Nuaabnum, Lehan 
lor Schroeder, Watson for Perry, Bowker 

for Marshall, kiU-y for McDonnell, 
Pasqualino for Bowker, Taylor (or I. than. 
IVrrs for Watson, Schroeder for Clabault, 
I iiikcjsitiii for Brown, Pitt for Spofford, 
< Mcnwahl for Finkelstein. 



Two Years Lose 



Last Game 



The Two Year eleven was forced t<> bon 
to Pee rhel d Academy in their final game 
of tin season by ■ score of SI to 13 al 
Deerheldon November 90. D eerheld was 

aht, id at the end of the third quarter with 

three toachdowns to their credit, but tin- 
Two Years uncorked a strong attach in 

the final period and stored twice. Bttffge 
and Gny featured for Deerheld, while 
Kellcy again < 1 ■« 1 stellar work for I In- 
Short horns. 

Although this (ansa was the third sm 
cesaive defeat suffered l>> the Two Years, 

the season as a whole was much more 
successful than last year. The team tied 
their first game and then won three 

straight, including a victory over Spring- 
field Commercial Hinh Sc h ool, the city 

champions. In nearly all their games, 
'Red" Hall's pupils demonstrated their 

ability to esxe ed their opponent! in 

making first downs, l»nt could not shoe 
the needed punch to win their three 
final contests. 



A bulletin entitled, "Proposed Organi 

zation of the Cape Cod Shell 1- is.li Com- 
pany", by Dr. Alexander K. (anco, head 
of the department of agricultural eco- 
nomics, has been published by the Cape 
c"od Chamber of Commerce. By a care- 
ful study of the situation, Dr. Cance 
found that the needs of the industry art- 
more economic produt tion, In-tter quality 
of product, conservation of the supply 
antl improved methods of marketing. 
The plan he pro|x>sed to the Chamber of 
( ommerce recommended the organiza- 
tion of a shell fish council to be com po sed 
of repres e n tatives from each fishing 
town, men familiar with the industry. 
This council would have power to regulate 
all fishing grants in these towns. To 
control all matters of sizing, grading, 
advertising and selling, a ("a|H- Cod Shell 
Fish Company is pro p os e d. The two 
organizations working together should 
bring order out of the public control of 
production and the private management 
of market distribution, l>oth of which 
are now in a chaotic state. 



At a joint meeting of the La nds c ap e 
antl Floriculture Clubs on Thursday 

evening, Nov. 10, Mr. Joseph O'llara, 
tlorist and landscape gardener of Gffeen- 
field gave an instructive talk on practical 
p r ob l e m s which confront the graduates 
upon entering the floriculture and lands 
scape professions. 



The only place in town to buy- 
strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 

DRURY'S 



College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



NORTHAMPTON 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

Paul ll.insell, Manager 

The Northampton Repertory Company 
Week November 30 

Wed. Thur. Fri. and Sat. (with Mat.) 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

3 P1.KASANT VIRKKT, (up one flight) 

OculUtu Prescription* Filled. Broken lenae* 

uccumtely replurcil 

Hit. Ill \ AI.AKM CLOCKS and olh.r 

li-M.lllll- lll.tkl-1 



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Channing Pollock's Big, Driving 
Mystery Melodrama 



Kvi-niiiKs.it K.l.'i S.it. M.ii .it | I., 
Priests Me, bb ft. 10. (iacliullns tax) 

I'li.mi- i:t:. 



• t 



Next Week: "THE NAUUIITY WIFK" 
By JACKSON and SKI.WYN 



Temple Tray 
Footed Tray 
Incense Burner 

Covered Boxes 
Of Korean Brass 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



UNITY CHURCH 



(Next the Nets Post Office) Invites You to lis Services. 



CHURCH SCHOOL, SUNDAY, 9.45 A. If. 

MORNING SKRVICF, SUNDAY, 10.45 A. M. 

UNITY SOCIAL CLUB, SUNDAY, 7 P. M. 



The Invitation of the Church 

/■rum "A Pasha", written for fif dedication of the Unity Trmplr, Oak I'ark, III. 

Il i* .i place lor prayers ami un-dii.il ion. 

It is a plate for st-rinuns, mmi^s and sisMBOBa. 

It is a tower of refttgC, rest and reliel; 

A fortress against deceit, oppression and violence; 

A prison where we may lot k up all our evil thoughts and passions, 

And K° our way in renewed |H-ace, poWCff and pMrposctutnCBS. 

An thou |KKir? Cdme, ami thou shall lie made rich. 

Art thou rich? Come, and thou shalt gain righteousness. 

Or art thou ignorant? (tune, and thou shall urow in wisdom. 

Art thou wank? Come, antl thou shalt Ih- made strong. 

Art thou Strong? ComSi and thou shalt find tasks for thy strength. 

Or art thou east tlown? Come, ami thou shalt he exalted. 

Art thou lonely/ Come, ami thou shalt have < oinradcship. 

Art thou sorrowful? Come, ami thou shall drink of the waters of solat e. 

Or art thou a sinner.-' Come, antl thou shall ^o and sin no more. 

Art thou filled with joy? Come, thai others may rejoin- with thee; 

For it is blessed to ni\'e kimmI Kif's, and it is blessed to retcive. 

And hast thou light!' Come, that others may walk in the light 

Come, and thou shalt learn to love thy neighbor as thyself; 

And thou shalt know <.<xl as the I at her, 

And trust in him even through the marble gates of death. 

Come, and the Ki ng dom of LOVS shall be on Earth as it is in Heaven 

Amen. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

Pens, Pencils - Kodaks and Films - Victrolas and Victor Records 

Instrument Strings - Tooth Brushes and Dentifrices 
Hair Brushes and Combs - Talcums, Lotions and Toilet Needs 



Smokes 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Sodas 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST, MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 



Everything 

the new 
student needs 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

IN THE M BUILDING 



Paper Supplies 
Stationery 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 

No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mans 

Our Laundry First CIhm 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
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That Unquestioned Touch of excellence and character— which the folks at home will see in you ... 
and miss in others will not come by accident. 

CARL H. BOLTER H " annto 



Amherst 



i 



»«- r» si. 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, DEC. 2, 1925 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 



Thurs. 

3 00. 
7.30 



(,l..ii;i Svninsim In 

"STAGE STRUCK" 
her latest pioductlon by 
Frank R. Adams. Her best 
since "MANIIANDLKD." 
News Fables Pathe Comedy 



Friday 



6.45, 



8.30 



Saturday 

3.00. * 45 

8.30 



POULTRY SHOW 



Harbara I. 


a Marr In 


"NIK 


HKART OF A 




SIRKN" 


SportlUhl 


Put he Comedy 



Raymond Crlflith In 

"HE'S A PRINCE" 
Funnier than "Paths 
Paradise" 
News Educational Comedy 



to 



Mon. 



Wednesday 

Thursday 

NEXT 

WEEK 



MASONIC MINSTRELS 
No MOVIES 



THE PONY EXPRESS" 
James Cruie's successor to 
"The Covered Waflon" 



A full supply of 



WE 



. Fraternity and College Banners, Pennants, and Stationery 

WILL BE GLAD TO SHOW YOU OUR STOCK 

AGGIE INN 




ALUMNI NOTES 

'20 H. E. Weatherwax, employed with 
A. U. Taylor '05, landscape architect in 
Cleveland, Ohio, has been placed in 
charge of the construction work on the 
President Harding Memorial at Canton, 

Ohio. 

•20 Alfred A. Clough is now Field 
Representative for the Commission on 
Apprenticeship for the Building Indus- 
tries in Boston and vicinity. His address 
is 120 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 






If You Want a Good Buy 

Drop in and look over our sheepskin 

coats. 

All lengths in good warm serviceable 

coats priced from . . . $° to $25 

Also a new lot of Tuxedo suits, 

Specially priced at $40. 



F. M. Thompson & Son 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes 






Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST & DEACON. Props 



FKKSIIMKN 



SOPHOMORES JUNIORS SENIORS ATHLETES 

Do You Know? 
"HOW TO STUDY" 

The Students Hand-Book of Practical Hint, on the Technique of 

Effective Study 
by WILLIAM ALLAN BROOKS 
A GU9M COBUtafa* hundreds of practical ^VmiJ%ft&MOLAS™C 
e«JU -t laming, to wist student. 1°£™*H ££1 UVM SC,IOLAS1 ^ 
RESULTS .it a minimum co*t ot tunc triors , and latigtie. 

MPKT1ALLY RECOMMENDED for overworked students and athletes 
engaSHn^ iLltaSS acivitie, and for average and honor students who 
are working for high m totastk aduewsssra*, 



Some of the Topics covered 

Shortcuts in Effective 



Scientific 

Study. 
Preparing for Examination.. 
Writing Good Kxamination.. 
Brain and Digestion in Relation 

to Study. D ., 

Hn to Take Lecture and Reading 

Advantages and I)isad^antages of 
Cramming. 



Diet During Athletic Training. 
Mow to Study Modern Languages. 
How to Study Science. Literature, 

etc. 
Why Go to College? 
After College. What? 
Developing Concentration and 

Efficiency. 
The Athlete and Ills Studies, 
etc.. etc., etc.. etc., etc., etc . 



Why You Need This Guide 

... • f . ..,,. th-it f-iiliire to auidc and direct study is the weak point in 
lh , 2£3&&& tSSSVUt M. Whipple. UniversUv 0,1 Jjfij. 
•■The succe-Cul men in -tej.do nP^ASS^KSS: 

° Utk .!?: ISt who I ave n" -J, leaun How to Study/work is very often a 
rha .,»t .' a lUgr-lUitU,..." and an insuperable obstacle to contentment. Prof. 

A l *£uaW TO STUDY" will show you how to avoid all misdirected effort. 

ret a good star, and make this year a highly successful one by tending 
for tins hand-book and guide NOW . 

You Need This Intelligent Assistance 



CLIP! 

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Gentlemen: 

Meant >>' ul xts ■ '°P y of " How , to Stutl >'' 
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AGGIE GRIDMEN 

(Continued on Page 4) 
and White quarterback chose to kick. 
The first score came at the end of a 
pretty 46-yard drive which was initiated 
by a twenty-yard end run by Moberg 
and which was culminated when Nichols 
plunged through the line for the count. 
Jones' attempt for the extra point hit the 
cross bar. 

The Agates continued to outplay their 
opponents and in the next period they 
tallied again. This advance started on 
M.A.C.'s 37-yard line. Hilyard and 
Haertl did mot of the ball carrying. In 
this advance Hilyard displayed well (he 
power of short line thrusts. It took six 
first downs to reach the Springfield zero 
line but there never was any hesitation 
until Hilyard finally dove into the end 

zone. 

Springfield's scores were none of them 
made in this way but were all due to 
long runs by Berry and Maddox. Spring- 
field's first points came soon after Jones 
had kicked the extra points after M.A.C.'s 
second touchdown. Berry, behind good 
interference, got away on an end run and 
he ducked his way through to a nearly 
clear field but he was brought down on 
the one yard mark after going 45 yards. 
Boughner in his second plunge at the lijje 
was declared over for a touchdown. 

In the third period the Agates did not 
open up as they had earlier in the game 
and Springfield flashed as though they 
were inspired. The interference was re- 
markable and the tackling was deter- 
miued. In this quarter the Y-men scored 
the second time when Berry caught a 
punt on his own forty-yard line and 
twisted and dodged through to a clear 
field Bad a touchdown. But this was not J 
to be the last of the sensations. Spring- 
field fought desperately but against an 
equally desperate opponent to overcome 
the lead that had now been reduced to 
one point. It was not until the closing 
minutes that the final tally came. The 
score came as the result of a "Shoestring" 
play. When the Ked and White men 
lined up Maddox was not with them but 
almost on the sidelines. The ball was 
passed without signals and Berry threw I 
pretty DMM to the fast end who was even 
now far from the nearest wearer of the 
Maroon and White. 

Much credit should l>e given to the 

Spriaffeld interference. The M.A.C . ends 

and tackles were hard pushed on every 

plav. But in spite of this handicap 

[Jones, Gavin, and Cook all played well. 

The summary: 



TUTORING 

Do your themes come hack 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 3158 



Shoes-That-Will-Wear 

At Price* That Are Fair 

HOSIERY AND RUBBER 
FOOTWEAR 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 
Alumo Skates are faster, lighter and 
stronger. The only aluminum skate. 
Come in and see the new Wright & 
Ditson hockey outfits. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUNS1NGWEAR and HEDAL1A 

SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $U9 $1.75 

G. Edward Fisher 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORA TED 

275 High St. Holyoke 



s h oe S 

— AND— 

H O S I 



S I E R Y 



of Quality and Fashion for 
M. A. C. Students 

Harry B. Berman, 1920 



You will find an mediant 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP . . . 
equipped with the rnont up-to-date Goodyear 
Machinery and a modern 
SHOE SHINING PARLOR 
at 111 Amlty-St., - Labrovltz Block 

We understand your requirements and are pre- 
pared to meet your needs. 
All work guaranteed. Shoes shined and dyed. 

VINCENT GRANDONICO. Prop. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Walt 

NEW PRICES 

Men's Whole Soles. Rubber Heels - - - »2SS 

Men's Half Soles. Rubber Heels - - - 1-75 

Mens Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels - - * 2? 

Mens Half Soles >- 30 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOUSE 
Open till 8 P. M. 



Ask tor 



NEW 
HANDY PACK 

WRIGLEYS 



CHEWING SWEET 



Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the best in everything 



COLLEGE SHOES 

— AT — 

TOWN PRICES 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 




MM 

More for Tour Money 



Springfield 
Crawley, k 
Hafner.lt 
Bartlett, lg 

Elliott, c 
Howe, rg 
Ran. rt 
Bother, re 

Berry, ql> 
Maddox, rhb 
Moles, thb 
Boughner. fl> 

Score by periods 

Springfield 

MAX. 

Touchdowns— Nichols 



M.A.C. 

re, Jones 
rt, Marx 
rg, Thurlow 
c. Cmihig 
lg, Baker 
It, ('.avin 
le, Cook 
qb, GoBtafeOO 
lhh, Sullivan 
rhb, Moberg 
fb. Nichols 
1 2 X 4 Ttl. 
6 8 6— 18 
Q 7 0— II 
Hilyard, Berry, 



TheSlickestCoatontheCampus! 



Maddox, Boughner. Point from trv after 
touchdown— Jones, Referee— J. Keegan. 
Umpire— A. W. Keane. Head linesman— 
I. Whalen. Field judge— J. Young. 
Time— lo-minutc periods. Substitutions: 
M.A.C" —Haertl for Sullivan, Tulenko for 
Baker, Hilvard for Nichols, Nichols for 
Hilyard, Hilvard for Nichols, Baker for 
Tulenko, Black for Baker, Amstein for 
Marx, Sullivan for Haertl, Tulenko for 
Black. Mahoney for Sullivan, McAllister 
for Couhig; Springfield— Wherle for Ran, 
Cheadel for Wherle, Shaw for Bartlett. 
Leader for Howe, Yates for Boflier. Smith 
for Moles, ( logston for Shaw, Mahnkin 
for Boughner. Bartlett for Clogston, 
(logston for Bartlett. 

The November number of the American 
City contains an illustrated article bv 
Professor Frank A. Waugh of this college 
entitled "Wherefore Country Planning?" 
The article argues that country planning 
it not a new thing but a simple application 
of common sense in practical business. 



No well dressed college man is 
without one. It's the original, 
correct slicker and there's noth- 
ing as smart or sensible for 
rough weather and chilly days. 
Made of famous yellow water- 
proof oiled fabric. Has all* 
'round strap on collar and elas- 
tic at wrist-bands. 
Clasp-closing style 
Button-closing style 

Stamp the correct name in your 
memory, and buy no other. 
The "Standard Student" is 
made only by the Standard 
Oiled Clothing Co., N. Y. C 

Slip one on 

ALL GOOD 




JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



PERSONAL ENGRAVED CHRISTMAS CARDS 

FROM YOUR OWN PLATE 

25 cards for $3.00 - - 100 cards for $7.00 

If you have no plate your cards may be printed by the R ELU 5 FA ' 
GRAF non-plate process. - COME IN AND SEE OUR SAMPI ,H 
A large assorment of cards for hand coloring 



Opportuni^ _Often Jtaocta But Once - „ y and ,„„„ „ _ 

^■-•"^JJjnfnTCK. BROS. * GAUtf 



LIBRARY of the 
Massachusetts 

I 



Si> UlafiBaritufigttB CollggtaH 



Vol. XXXVI, 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, DEC. 9, 1925 



No. 10 



AGGIE REVUE TO 
COME ON DEC. 12 

..(),,, is" will be Original Production 
h\ Mar) Boyd '26 and Harry Fraser '26 

\ n, u and entirel) different feature 
the Vgjde Revues of recent yean if 
lied i" the Aggie Revue, which will 
i: in Bowker Auditorium, Stock- 
Hall, <>n Saturday, I tocember 12, 
m. it is to be a musical corned) 
entitled "Dorie," the words of which 
written by Mar) ' Boyd 'i-'o with 
,l, ( ,, .., ... provided by Harry Fraser '38. 
The cast which baa been selected from 
the best student talent, is as follows. 



raise 

' SB 

H 

II,- mill 

Tin- heroine'! ristcf 

lie 



„cin ... 

A mixed chorus, composed of sixteen 
members, and several spedalt) acts, will 
be important features] of the eveaing. 

Mi" l.nitt Jones will appear in a special 

, There will also be ■ dance Riven 

in Marion Caaaidy "38 and II. K. Ansell 

which will offer a real treat to the 
audience. 

Ih, (l.uiciiiR is being directed by 11. K. 
Aasell ''-"■'. the huinh is directed by Harr) 
Fraser '-*>. Theodore Grant '~(i and 
Mary T. Boyd '2t> are directing the 
tpeaking parts. 



Roy N orcroi *H 
Mario* ( sjstdj '-'<> 

J.uni-i Richards '-•', 

Emery loud ~ji< 

. , Kvrlyn Davi* -•> 

Miriam Ilii" 1's 

Kaaasta RarUeti '-'* 

Ann,- 1 1 i ii< lu-y. ''J'.) 

Raymond Plummet '20 



our 



Men Added 

to Collegian Board 



Oat sophomore and three freshmen 

elected to the editorial staff of the 

' 0LLICUM Hoard at the regular m e eting 

last Monday ni^ht. The new mem b ers 

I Rockwell Smith, Jr. '28 of Madley. 
Edward II. Nichols '28 of Motttpeher, 
Vi William ft Phinney '29, of Willtman- 
- m. snd VY. Garden Hunter '28 <>f South 

ury. 

FOOTBALL NFAVSLETTER 

ISSUED ONCE MORE 



Athletic Department Publishes 
Unique Periodical for Alumni. 



Ilu- latest issue of the "Football News- 
letter" hav recently been stnt out. This 
in periodical covering MAC. football 
activities quite completely. "Published 
ever) nine-in-a-while by the M.A.C. 
Football Staff for the purpose of keeping 
Conner football men in touch with the 
department and in touch with each other." 
I'.in ,,t the paper is d e vo te d to ■ recogni- 
tion of the infinite amount of valuable 

m e rendered by the alumni. The 
various and varied helps of over fifty men 

lentioned. For example, "Hub" 
' "llin- '22, among other things was the 
author of the ruse that helped win the 

..line. Many sent in letters that 
•We posted or read to the team and 

iga that were of great value to the 

Qg staff, The pre season coaching. 

k^ to the team at various times 
f lurir>K the -eason, and the S peeches a' 
Be Tufts game mass meeting were all 
pven. much deserved credit. Aggie 
Kerns to have alumni that are active!) 

ted as well as man who keep 
a i passive way. • 

ANDERSON AND HAERTL ELECTED 

Edwin J. Haertl '27 of Dorchester was 

" : "l assistant manager of basketball 

pn'l Andrew B. Anderson '27 of Hudson 

• n a^istant manager of hockey 

''V vote of the students at Chapel on 

ber 4th. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



ThurMJay — 

; p. m. Assembly. Speaker. 

Rev. J. V. Barry of Springfield. 
Friday— 

s P hi. Faculty Dance. 
7 !' m. Interclass Basketball, '28 vs. 
28 vs. 8 Vr. 
Sa, urda> 

Aggie Revue. 
Sunday— 

m. Sunday Chapel. Speaker, 
William S. Anderson, acting 
president of Boston I'niversity. 



Orpheus Club 

Gives Concert 



Large Attendance at First Social 
Union Event of Season. 



Omt m\ hundred people enjoyed tht 
first Social Union entertainment of the 
\i.ii last Frida) evening in Bowker 
Auditorium given b> the Orpheus Club 
<>! Springfield, a male chorus of about 
one hundred voices. The ( !ul> was assisted 
l>\ \li>^ Ruth A. Ray, a young, talented 

violinist, and Mrs. Howard A. King. 

accompanist . 

The program was opened with the 
selection "Let Their Celestial Concerts 
All Unite (Samson)" b) Handel, which 
was rendered b) The Orpheus Club. The 

club gave tWO Scotch folk songs, "l.ocli 

Lomond" and "The Piper o' Dundee" in 

the Imm of which a baritone solo was ver\ 

effective!) sung by Mr. Edwards. Miss 
Ray presented two pieces by Ries, 
"Gondoliera" and "Perpetuum Mobile", 

but he! most beautiful number was the 
"Hungarian Dance No. 5" b) Brahma 
The negro spiritual, "Didn't My Lord 
Deliver Daniel" brought out clearly the 
blending of voices which is a notable 
characteristic of the ilub. Other num- 
bers on the program were: "The Lamp 
in the West" by Parker. "Shadow March" 

by Protheroe, "Fuxay-Wuxxy" by speaks 

and "The I'nx'cssion of the Peers (lo- 

lanthc .■" bv Sullivan. 

At the close of the concert the student 
body arose and sang the Alma Mater. 

It is interesting to note that l\ I >. (it iggs 
'18, composer of several of our best 
college songs, was present in this club 
and was largely re sponsib le lor pl.ti ing 

the club on our Social Union program, 



Files Bill to Change 

Control of College 

Cri&gs T.< Introduces Measure to 
Restore Power to Trustees. 



I ■ l,.. l.itivt bill prepared by the 
Trustees and Alumni seeking to define 
the authority of the Trustees ill managing 
the affairs of the College, has been filed 

by R ep r es e n tative F. D. < iriggs '18, of 
Springfield. If enacted into law this bill — 

1. Will restore to the trustees their 
power to elect members of the stall, 
fix their salaries within limits approved 
by the Governor and Council and define 
their dut ies. 

2. Will enable the trustees to make 

minor purchases of supplies Independent 

of the State I'un h.ising Agent. 

.'{. Will remove all College and Experi- 
ment Station publications from the con- 
trol and editorial supervision of the State 
Commission on Administrat ion and Fi- 
nance, and will restore to the Trustees 
their authority to regulate such printing. 

4. Will clarify certain existing law- 
pertaining to th< College which are 
ambiguous, with respect to the control 
as vested in the Trustees ,md in Other 

Stale agencies. 



EIGHTEEN FOOTBALL 

LETTERS AWARDED 

Only Four Letter Mon will Return 

to College \oxt Year. 

I ighteen men were awarded football 
".M"s, fourteen of whom are due bo 
receive their sheepskins next June, accord- 
tog to the upon ol the met ling last week 

"i the Joint Committee on Intercollegiate 

Athletics. ( )in newspaper has stated that 
Coach "Kid" (.me is due for anothci 

"building year" in 1920. This is all too 
true. But let us consider rather what 

these men have done for M.AC, football. 

I o sum tin it service up briefly, t h< j have 
maintained ii not raised the high standard 
of sportsmanship ol Aggie teams, the) 

have won M.A.C. a place high up among 

the small New England Colleges, and the) 

have been among us as men with whom it 

is .i privilege to associate Those receiving 

letters are: (apt. L. L. Jones '26 ol 

brock ton. A. 1 1. ( , list a I son L'ti ol It rock ton 
J. R. Hilyard '27 ol bevc.lv. D.C.Sullivan 

'2tioi Amherst, E.J. Haertl '27 of Jamaica 
Plain, II. E. Moberg '2f» ol Brockton, J. 

Tulenko L'ti of Amherst, W. G. Amstein 

'27 of Deerfield, < .. II. Thurlow *2fl of 
W. Newbury, P. II. Couhig L'ti ol Beverly, 
I.. A. (.avin '26 Of Nat ick. A. W. Cook '2S 

ol Belmont, M. M.Smith 'L'Hoi Worcester, 
II. II. Richardson *28 of MUha, I A 

baker 'L'liol Springfield. C W. Nichols '20 

of Natick. R. W. Fesaendefl "28 of Middle 

bOTO, and Mgr. F. \\ . Warren '20 of Stow. 
Jones, C.iistafsoii, Sullivan, Moberg, 
and Gavhl have made their letter three 
years and Thurlow and Couhig are letter 
men of two year's standing. 



AtiCIL RKVUE 



"Doris" will lie given by the 
Aggie Revue Co. in How ker Audi 

toriuni on Saturday, Dec. 12th 

at 7 o'clock. Musi, and fancy 
dancing are special features of 
this unique musical comedy. Ad- 
mission either by activities ticket 

or by payment of $l.<)0. 



Alpha Gamma Rho 

Has House Party 

Moon Mullin" Fills Two Engage- 
ments in One Evening. 

Alpha Gamma Rho conducted ■ very 

successful house party in spite of the in- 
clement weather last Saturday alternoon 
.ind evening, December ,">th. Twenty 

four couples were present, with musk 
provided by Mom Midline Melodious 

Music Makers. The chaperones were 
Mis-, Stmchfield from Mt. Holyoke, and 
Mr. and Mrs. A. \\ . Phillips from MAC. 
An excellent dinner was s. rved at I >rapci 
Hall. Alter the dinner "Moon Mullin" 
adjourned to play for the co-ed dam <■ in 

the Memorial building and Bray's Or- 
chestra was engaged for the remainder ol 
tin house dance. 

The house was artistically decorated 
with hemlock boughs and oak leaves. 



Students Hear Noted Speakers 



Two rioted speakers delivered lectures 

on the campus last week under the aus- 
pices of the M.A.C. Christian Association. 
On Wednesday evening Rev. A. Ray 
Petty of New York, gave a talk on "Im- 
migrants" in which he interestingly de- 
scribed the living conditions of Italian 
immigrants in the New York slums. He 
stated that Americans do not understand 
the immigrants and consequently the 
immigrants mistake the attitude of the 
Americans toward them. He expressed 
the opinion that a better understanding 
between the two and the improvement of 
living conditions would do much toward 
making American citizens of the immi- 
grants. 



Dr. Henry H. Crane spoke on Thursday- 
evening on the subject, "The Paradox of 
Power," captivating the attention of his 
audience by his magnetic personality and 
the original method in which he presented 
his ideas. He illustrated his talk most 
effectively by acting out examples, the 
most outstanding of which was his acting 

of the"Betrayal"in which he dramatically 

pictured the traitor. Judas. His talk was 
followed by a lively discussion. 



Main Aggie students took advantage 
of the opportunit) tohefrVachel Lindsa) 
one of the beet known modern American 

poets, Monday evening, November 30, at 
Amherst College. The Johnson Chapel 
was filled to capacity with admirers of 

this poet. 

The opening selection, the "Red Kagle", 

was a picturesque representation of the 

West. This was followed by "The Chip- 
munk", a humorous, naturalistic poem 
dealing with the peculiar habits of the 
chipmunk as seen by a [>oct. 

Mr. Lindsay next presented a reading 
showing his conception of the u n iv erse 
arranged as a map. The interest through- 
out was centered on Springfield, Illinois, 
the birthplace and home of the poet. 
Following this reading he read the 
"Gypsy Fiddlers", I poem possessing the 
musical and rhythmic swing which is so 
characteristic of his poetry. 

The next two selections contained a 
sympathetic and colorful study of negro 
spirits and psychology. These poCOM: 
"The Congo" and "John Brown", also 
show the ease with which the negro spirit- 
uals may be put to music. 

In his final recitation. Mr. Lindsay paid 
tribute to William Jennings Uryan, who, 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Football Has Meant 

Much to Aggie Seniors 

Retiring M em ber! of Team All Knjoy the Geme but St^ | 

Suggest Radical Chandei 



SOPHOMORE QUINTET 

STILL UNDEFEATED 

Rood and Thomas High Scorers for 
192S Team in Victories over Juniors 
and Two Years. 



The seniors nosed mil the juniors i>v a 

score of Ifl to 17, while the sophomores 
triumphed over the Two Years, 87 B, in 

the interclass games played on Dec. 1st. 

In the first contest, the seniors were lead 
ing. II ", at half time, but J he juniors 
came back in the final hall and out. scored 
their opponents. In the second game, the 
sophomores, after the first few minutes 

of plav, easily outstripped the Two Yens. 

The sophomores outclassed the juniors 
in the second half to annex their third 
victory in the series, -"•• 11, on Dec. 4th. 
The closing game between the lieshinen 
and the Two Years was a nip-and-t tick 
contest which the fminer finally won, 19 
Hi. At the present writing, the SOpho 
mores are the only undefeated quintet. 

(Continued on Patio 1) 



FRATERNITY SERIES 

WILL START JAN. 5 



All Players to Come Under I ligibilit v 
Ruling. Fourteen 'learns will Com- 
pete. 



Strict requirements ol eligibility will be 
enforced in the mterfretemit) basketball 

series which OpCM <>ii January "ith and 
doses late in I ebriiary. AH v. n sits and 

freshman varsity players will l«- barred 

from the teams, and all the meuilieis ol 
the coni|Hiing clubs must la- elibigle 
accor d i ng to the records in the Item's 
Office ill older to prevent men of varsity 
caliber who are low in their studies from 
taking part in the games. 

An innovation in the loining series is 
the establishment ol fourteen teams, in- 
cluding r ep r esen tatives frees the Two 

Year Paternities and the non fraternity 
group. The fourteen entrants are divided 
Into two groups, members ol each group 

playing all ths teams in their raapective 

sections. The winners in each division 
will decide the championship in a post 

season battle. The schedule is as foUowei 

J.,n. :. I'.S.K. fs. K.S. & A.G.K. : IT 

7_A s f i i kK.GJP.1 N.F. 

H-U-T.V.ri. L.< A &.K I- St. I> PA 
11 — K.K. iv PS K. ■ AT (. iv SIM.. 
it asp. at. K.s. ,\ \ O.K. a?.* 
16— L.t A. rj.T.r. & K.i. P ■ K K. 

mi re at. ps k. ;« i) pa. at. a.t.<;. 
ta k s. M.Q.T.V. & s.PK. at. N I 

i < \ n. As P. ft A.G.R. at, K. K. 
87 I I • K.s. & K.G P.i D pa. 
i.i. 1 K-K. St. Q-T.V. ft A.T.G. at. N J 

4— L.C.A.n. PS K. Hi S .P I- K<. P 

5_ A g.p at K-ICft a (. ft. i D f v 
8— P.SK. at. 0.1 V. ft A.1 C ki. P. 
11— K.S. at. L.t A. & NF, at. K I 
13— K.K. W.T.C. <v A (. K ■ K (. P 
15 A S P ; ilT.V.&S.P.K. r.s. K I 
1'. K K at. K.S. & DI'A. rs. N.K. 
a AS P M PS K. & A.'l I G R. 

M OTA', at, T .r. I s I' K H UP A 
27— K.K. at. U< A ,s \ 1 i. : K I 



I o Ik' in st\ I. the ( i H l l ..1 v\ h.,- I 

the senior members of the 1925 football 

team lour quest ions. 
I >o vou like football.'' 
\\ hat has football at MAC. in, .n.t to 

you? 
What improvements in the gam routd 

yOU suggest } 

I »! those who played against you tins 
fall whom do vou consider I he U ,1 ' 

The entile delegation expressed th m 

selves empliatn allv in the affirmal 

Gavin said, "Football i* more faa inating 
than love or wine." Gustafson said, 

"t eitaiulv . if I didn't like it I doubt it 
any re.ison ol any s,>n would i tus.- me 
tO I'lav. There are few things | , : 

more." 

I he anman to ths second qui sti at 
were varied. Larry Joaee 1 reasons were 

that football had brought him mi contact 
with a Wonderful group of nun. it h.il 

taught him respect (ot discipline, and it 

had given him a pride in being able to play 
on a team of hard hitting, clean, rugged, 
loothall plav ers. The influence ol I he 
assoi iation with real men was e null isi/ed 
bv several. < .us put it as follows, "|| h.is 
given me an oppoitunity to work undiir 

real men who .ue endeavoring to make 

real men ol Others." Mob, rg s.i\ i, "Pool 

ball at M.A.C. has given m friendships 
that will outlive .ill otlei connections 
with the game." Myron Smith wrote ae 

interesting discourse imd< i this head whu h 
is, in part, as follows: "loot l.all al M.A.C. 
has meant a lot to inc. Ii has been a real 
lesson in conduct. In OOS ol our games 
the Opposing players spent much ol their 
time in Inn ling oaths a I i: -. and degratory 
remarks. It certainly branded them as 
anything but sportsmen; while in other 
cases vou could defeat a le.un .mil |. , I 
that they were the best Sportsmen ever 
after the game was ovi i " Another point 
that was mentioned bv several is best 
(Continued on P.u<- l\ 



HILYARD ELECTED 
FOOTBALL CAPTN 

Star Ituckiifld Man will Lead Aggie 
Cridstcrs Next Year. 

Joseph K. Hilyard of Heverly and 

Deerheld Academy, was slee t ed i.ipiain 

of football last Ihursday by the [92S 
letter men. "|<m" was the onlv man in 
the i la--, of '27 to make the team last 
Ve, il. He Started football Bt Deerfield 

Academy, one of the small prep schools 

With a big athletic reputation. He was 

i boeen captain of the fmnhinsii team when 

he first came to M.A.C. and has loomed 
up as the logical man lor the IB27 varsity 
Captaincy ever since he joined the regular 

squad. He has played fullback lor two 
-.f.irs and he has figured both offensively 
and defensively. 



Crooks '27 will 

Lead Harriers 

Six Members of 1925 Team Receive 
Letters. 



Six numbers of the 1938 cross country 
team were awarded their letters ;ii ,i 
meeting of the Joint Committee on Inter 

collegiate Athletics on December 1st. He- 
sides Captain Herbert P, bartlett *9o of 
West Springfield, those receiving letters 
were Kllsworth II. Wheeler '26, Raphael 

A. Ib'ron '27, Harry C. N'ottebaert '27, 

Clarence A. (rooks '27, and Frederick 

W. Swan '27. 

Clarence A. Crooks '27 of North Brook 
field has been chOSCO to lead the team in 
1926, He has been one of the most con- 
sistent finishers this fall, a goo<l repr. 
tative of the team which won only one 

first place, but captured five out of sfj 

dual rai es. 



TWELVE GAMES ON 

HOCKEY SCHEDULE 

Only Four Home Contests for M.A.C 
1'iickstcrs. 



I. ,u k of ice has prevented any pr.u tin- 
by candidates lor the lux key team, but 
Coach "Ked" Hall expects to have his 
sip/ad on the i<e during the battel part of 
the Christmas vacation if weather con- 
ditions are favorable. 

The si hedule for l!*2f> numbers twelve 
games and in< hides a home and home 
series with both the I'niversity of New 
Hampshire and Amherst. On account of 
the large number of contexts abroad, the 
team can look forward to several enjoy- 
able trips. The schedule follows: 

J ;t n . 






9— M. IT. 


here 


16 Hamilton 

M i< p. 1 




■jo Dartmouth 


•* 


22— U.i-f N M 


" 


B Issss 


** 


26 — Aiuli. ' 


•* 


1 Mi<|(|l<-biiry 


lure 


10 W.-.t Point 


away 


,,f n. n. 


here 


16— Williams 


sway 


in — Aarissiat 


ban 







; 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, DEC. 9, 1925 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, DEC. 9, 1925 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the MMMCkvMttf 
Agricultural College. PubHthfd «v«ry 

Wednesday by At student*. 



HOARD 


OF EDITORS 


Mary T. Bom *• 




K<lit(ir-in-< 'liii-f 


JQHN K. l.AMIll 11 


M 


Man Kim Edlt« 


DEPARTMENT EDITORS 


Editorial 




Many T. EoW> "-''> 


Cider Trcsi 




Mauy T. I'"VI> M 


Athletic* 




Wit 1.1 AM 1.. l>". 1 
IIakoi i> L ( LAM 


Campus News 




Raymond f. Dian '97 

Kiisv.oi.ni BABNAI li '2s 

JoSKI-IIINK Pi 


Co-Ed News 




FUMCM < I*'" « !; " 27 


Faculty News 




kknhsi i.. Brwesa H 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Alvin G. Stkvens "20 Business Man kgM 

Edwin A. \YiimV28 Advertises lfam«H 

Lewis H. Whitakkk '27 C in ulation Mati.^et 

John K. White '27 

Douglas W. Lokin«. 91 

< haki.is f, CLAOQ '-7 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Coixegian. 

In case of change of address, sul>- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as (>ossible. 



the linn of the iNth Century, and so il 

gOW. Finally this daRM <>f inter <h'p<n- 
ilciit (ipiiiions tomes to .hi end in a da) 
tablet which embalm the opinion of i 
wise Babylonian, or ■ stone carved with 
i! , «y ml "i "i the erudite Egyptian. 

If this is not gossipi tin* handini 

down of Information and ch a ngin g it 

prettj badly in the proceta, what » J 

ll„ itudent then is in direct competition 

with the Sewing Circle! 

Thii matter haa a direel application to 
ourselves, for we are about to enter the 
arena and battle with our professors lor 
i| l( ( .ic.it ( knaip Priat in other words. 
i, i the title of < iood < iosaiper. If we can 
repeat whai we have been told in a form 

-i iently ungarbled, we win— and pass 

iIk course. If on the other band, the 
professor lias been better in spreading 
gossip than we are in repeating it, we 

lost and Hunk the course. This is an 

improvement over the Sewing Circle, m 

ii puts an element of danger in the pro- 
ceedings. 

Good luck t<> you. fellow spestpers, 
May yon triumphantly repeat to your 
examiners go— ip meriting their highest 

marks, for "He who g os sip s will return 
to gossip still another term." 




AT THE ABBEY 



Entered as second-, lass matter at the A"'l« • ;■ 
PortOflit-e. Accepted lor mailing at iP*«al ratt 
of posttse provided foi ... hi t.-m 1103, Act of Oc- 
tober. 191/ authorised August W. i">»- 



The Amherst Agriculturists 



We Suggest ' n a " seriousness that the 

greatest need of the college is a press 

agent. A good press tgeat, even in one 
year, could do much t<> wipe out the 

widespread misunderstanding as to the 
what, where, and why of M.A.C. We, as 
an institution, are one of the oldest and 
the least known of the public wards. 
"Isn't there a school of some sort over in 
Amherst?" asks one taxpayer of another, 
and the reply is either "Oh yes, you mean 
Amherst Aggie. That's where they teach 
plowing and milking to the farmers," or 
more often, "I don't know. Is there?" 
And it was a citizen of as mar a city as 
Northampton who said to us, "You go 
to Aggie? I didn't know they allowed 
women there. IWt you find farm work 
pretty hard?" 

And so it goes. The press is not un- 
friendly to us. It is merely uninformed. 
as witnesses an article recently published 
in a Huston paper, purporting to give M 
account of the four colleges of the Connie 

ticut Valley. Amherst, Mt. Hotyoke, and 

Smith were all dealt with at length. Of 
MAC. the writer slid: "It has one of 
the finest chemical laboratories in this 
part of the country. Its students are 
easily distinguished from those of Amherst 
College by their uir of familiarity vtt 
the great outdoors, and their greater in- 
formality of dress." 

Well— there is plenty of outdoors on 

our campus, it is true, and we do get 

thorough}) acquainted with it on our ten 
minute jatmta betw e en say Math and 
Stockbridge. Bat what a characterise 

tion! The article will undoubtedly serve 
to introduce the college to many who 
have not heard of it before, but it is 
hardly the ideal introduction. A press 
agent would obviate these unpleasant 
incidents. 

Men who indulge in such rural festivi 
ties as informals and house dances will 
lie particularly interested in the conchid 
ing paragraphs of the article, which my 
in part: ". . . the nearness to one another 
of these colleges promotes a constant 
social contact. The A inherit boys are 
thoroughly familiar with the campuses of 
Smith and Mt. Holyoke, and in all three 
college communities there is the all per- 
vading air of joyous youth." 

What price Mass. Aggie? Is it our 
great Open spaas or our informal dress 
that makes us socially negligible? 

We repeat, a properly supervised press 
agent could do much for MAC. 



The Aggie Revue 

This year a new and entirely different 
form of entertainment will he given at 
the Aggie Kevue. A musical comedy is to 
he presented, the words of which were 
written by an M.A.C. student, which 
were set to music by another member of 
our student body. F urthermore the 
Comedy will be anected entirely by a cast 
drawn from selected student talent. This 

form of entertainment, developed from 

beginning to end. right here on our own 
Campus, shows that although this is a 
distinctly scientific institution, talent 
along artistic lines is not lacking. 

This is the first time since 1918 that a 

musical comedy has been presented at the 

Aggie Kevue. Twelve years ago a musical 
Comedy entitled "Pluto's Daughter," 
which was also written and enacted wholly 
by students here, was pres e nt e d at this 
college. This occurred several years ago. 
however, thus this year's Aggie Revue 
will be a distinct innovation to the present 
Student body. A great deal of time and 
effort is being devoted to make this miisi 



Why "Agates"? 

An alumnus wishes to know the win of 
the term "Agates." The good old name 
"Aggie" is becoming less used -the 
Strange term "Agate" spots the sporting 

pages like a sperics of linotype measles, 

and even appear- on lh.it habitat ol < "ii 
Servatism, the COI&EOUM editorial page. 
\\\ 11, we unleashed the hounds of 

journalism on the trail, and they came 

hack (any ing in their eager jaws several 
morsels of information. We say "Agates" 

l,e< .lll-l- : 

1. We like variety. It's like using 

cinnamon sugar on waffles once in a while. 

We like the good old fashioned maple 
syrup just as well as ever, but variety is 

the of life, (hill in the missing 

spate and win tin- Cider I'ress' great 
postage Stamp one stamp, cancelled 
prize. Mail your answers early.) 

2, It's easier to say in moments of 

excitement Try it yourself. Get excited, 

about a game preferably, and then try 

yelling alternately "Hold 'em, Aggies" 

and "Hold 'em Agates." "Agates" Cits 

into grandstand enthusiasm best — and 

from that its translation to the sorting 
page is easily understood. 

."{. Sport writers are never content 
with the given names of part i cip a n ts of 
an> sort of kind, from football teams to 
fighting white mice. Novel appelations, 
nicknames, and special slang— these are 
the sport writers' goal. (Can you say 

"these are a goal" or should it be 

"these arc the goals?") 

4. The measles idea fits in well with 
the above. Words are as catching as 
measles. We caught "Agates." That's all. 



Saturday nighl l1 "' cr>eds again put >>ii 
i social fund ion that was claimed by all 

present to be successful. Whether it i> 
beside the point or not. the fad remains 

that the punch wis te mper e d with in 

some way although we have heard from 

several sources that benzine must have 

been added. Sixty couples attended and 

( harlestoned or jazzed or just danced to 
Moon Mullin's melodious music. Possibl) 
because of tin- advent of fresh thoughtl 
of Santa Clans, if there is one. the hall 

was decorated with red and green. 

The chaperons were Prof, and Mis. 
Judkins and Prof, and Mrs. Alderman. 



STUDENTS HEAR 
(Continued from Page I) 

according to him, was "the great Aiueri 
can poet who sang out-of-doors." This 
poem was written shortly after the close 
of the great World War in 1019 and there- 
fore contains much of the intense feeling 
which was at that time manifested against 
future wars. 



-CP 
C. O. D. 

You take a girl out, 

She expresses a wish to you: 
Then paying the charges 
Is the hard thing to do! 

P. H. 
CP 



"Art is anything that is done well." 
This was the statement made by Mr. 
Royal H. Farnuin of the Normal Art 
School, Boston, who was the speaker at 

Assembly last Thursday. Most people, 

according to Mr. I arnuin, think of art as 
applying solely to music, painting, sculp 
ture, etc. To show the fallacy of this idea, 
he quoted the definition given by Webster, 
that "art is the application of skill and 
taste to production, according to aesthetic 
principles," and then explained and illus- 
trated each element in the definition. The 
speaker went on to say that the three 
qualities which must be present in art, 
are order, proportion, and unity, and 
illustrated -his remarks by clever and 
amusing sketches on a blackboard. In 
concluding his talk, Mr. l-'urnum once 
more emphasized the fact that "art" does 
not mean only the so-called fine arts, but 
that it applies squally to agricultural 
production, whether it be milking a cow 
or packing eggs. 



Boston Papers, Please Note ! 

With reference to this little matter of 

informality of dress by which the Aggie 

cal comedy a success, and we believe that student may Ik- so easily noted (see the 



although it is an innovation wholly differ 
ent from the acts of recent years, it will 
nevertheless be well received. 

The tyiK- of vaudeville acts and short 
plays which have been presented during 
the last few years have grown somewhat 
monotonous, and last spring before school 
closed a plan was evolved for the develop- 
ment of something new in the line of enter- 
tainment to l>e pre s ent e d at the Aggie 

Revue. Through the combined efforts of 
Mary T. Boyd 'Jf. and Harry I'raser L'C. 
the musical comedy "Doris" was develop- 
ed during the summer vacation. It is 
now nearly ready for presentation and a 
delightful entertainment is anticipated. 

R. F. P. 



SOPHOMORE QUINTET 

(Continued from Page 1) 

The summaries. 



1926 

Jensen, If 
Kelso.rf 

Sawyer.r 



B. F. P. 

2 1 •"> 

3 1 7 
2 4 



Thompson.c.rg 113 
Langshaw.lg 
BartleU.rg 

Totals 8 3 19 

Referee— Tumey. 



1928 

Reed.rf 

McGuire.lf 

Blomquist.c 

McKwcii.Ir 

Tl.omas.rg.lf.c 

Kane.rg.rf 

t/ook.rg.c 



B. F. P. 

3 2 8 

4 



II 2 

3 11 

2 





2 

1 
I 
1 




Totals 1 1 B '-7 

Referee — Tumt-y. 



1927 

Briggs.rg 

Merlini.lg 

Murclough.c 

Morrill.rf 

Grimn.lf 



Totals 



2 Yr. 

Massa.lf.lg 

West.rg 

Holland ,c 

Tefft.rf 

Nillson.lf.lg 

Davidson .If 

Leoncini.lf 

Totals 



B. F. P. 
1 1 
1 1 

2 4 

3 6 
2 1 5 



7 3 17 



B. F. P. 





2 2 

2 4 




1 2 

3 2 S 




Study is Gossip! 

last week a certain professor assigned 
to his English classes as a theme subject: 
"Study is only a serious form of gossip," 
— an interesting assumption, which if 
justified makes of us better scandal- 
mongors than the traditional village old 
maid. 

And what, when you consider the 
matter carefully, is academic knowledge? 
Mostly secondhand information. The 
professor teaches what the hooks say that 
other men have found to be true. The 
research man of the 30th Century bases 
his work partly on accidental discovery 
and partly on what the men of the 19th 
Century have mid, and they in turn have 
based their knowledge on the opinions of 



192S 

K.'.-d.rt 

McGuire.lf 

Blomqtiist.c 

McKwen.rn 

Thomas, lg.c 

Kane.lg 

Totals 



B. F..P. 

4 1 9 

1 7 



2 

1 7 
4 



a 
o 
i 

3 
2 



1927 

Nash, 1r 

Briggs.rg 

Murdough.c 

ClagR.c 

Merlini.rf 

Griffin, If 



13 8 •-'<) Totals 



Referee — Tumey. 



1929 

Kelloy.lf 

Webber ,rf 

Coi.ko8,c 

t'ox.c 

Kcwan.lg 

Horan.lg 

Robertson, rg 

Totals 
Referee- 



B. F. P. 

1 I I 

2 4 

3 6 
o 





1 I 

• 3 10 
Davenport 



2 Yr. 

Holland ,rg 

W.st.lg 

Burgevin.c 

Tefft,rf 

Massa.lf 



Totals 



first editorial). 

Did you notice the Sunday-go-to-meet- 
ing aspect of many of the juniors and 
seniors in chapel last Friday? Clothes, 
we mean, not attitude. And did you 
wonder why the formality, and especially 
the hnpecabte neckware? To find out, 
ask Mr. Foster. Mr. Foster is the gentle 
man at the head of this column, so busily 
engaged in the operation of his stil — er — 
cider press. 

The reason was the annual M.A.C. 
reversal of the Judgment of Paris — Prof. 
Waugh's "Necktie Party," where the 
CO-eds act as judges and the men file by 
to be judged on the make-up, match, 
form, size, and general effect of their 
haberdashery choice. And — in spite of 
the many startling stripes and dashing, 
not to say dizzy, colors, the prize was 
won by a symphony in gray. We suggest 
that the winner's picture be sent, with the 
compliments of the college, to the writer 
of the "informality of dress" article. 

CP 

Agricultural Art 
The question we have heard several 
times is, "But what do you Agricultural 
students find to do in the winter when 
the ground is frozen and you can't plow 
or anything?" That depends, lady. One 
answer is that some of us make statues, 
for a certain class exercise. Human 
figures, supposedly, although that term 
was widely interpreted as meaning any- 
thing from a squat and ferocious Hercules 
to an attenuated Oriental damsel called 
(we hope we can spell this correctly) 
Zuleika. 

It was a most intriguing exhibition. 
The statues were of all sizes, shapes, 
colors, and conditions of avoirdupois. 
Some of them showed a considerable 
first-hand knowledge of the human 
anatomy, and some of them apparently- 
had taken only a correspondence course 
on the subject— as the figures ranged 
from the amazingly convex to the start- 
lingly concave. The overshoed flapper 
wading through a clay snowdrift looked 
superciliously at the unexpected contours 
of her more lightly clad companions, 
while a authentic gob glared defiance at 
Joe College himself. 

On the whole, it was an exhibition that 
Joe Spaghetti would have looked at and 
sighed — in envy or astonishment. 

CP 

And that's that! 



"People are not one self, but many 
selves. We are one thing today and 
another tomorrow." These were the 
words of Rev. Edwin B. Robinson, pastor 
of the Grace Congregational Church, 
Holyoke, in an exceedingly interesting 
sermon delivered at Sunday Chapel last 
week. Rev. Mr. Robinson chose as his 
text the verse "For the gotxl which I 
would, 1 do not; but the evil that I would 
(Continued on Page 3) 



FOOTBALL HAS MEANT MUCH 

Continued from Pafte li 

expressed in Gavin's words. "Football 

at M.AC, has been a source of drud 

much keen enjoyment, and I hope 

metaphysical benefit." Several men;, 

the physical benefits <>t football sm 
the development of co-ordination, quick 

thinking plus quick action and the m 

development in lines such as self dia 
Buddy Moberg said thai he agr» 
Knute Rockne, the game needs no im. 

provenunt. I.arry Jones and Rich 

second him. The improvements sugg< 
are both constructive and otherwise, \ 

popular sii^g, st ion U tiiat credit be given 
for first downs, possibly by giving 
point to each team lor each first d 

that it makes. Fessenden urged thai 
tendency toward spectacular plaj 

curbed because this typ • of football | 
to individual playing rath r than to | 
play. Several criticised the forward pm 
and John Tulenko suggested that onK 
three points be given for tOUchdowm 
scored by forward passing. Myron Smith 
said that the power of forward p,i 

ihould Ik- curbed before it develops into 

outdoor basketball. < '.us picked an es 

tircly different point of view. He re 

mended "that the fellows who play think 
over the things they have been taught to 
do during the period they were coaclnl 
I rom that material draw what coin hi- 
they could and apply them toother work. " 
A plea for better officials was made In 
t wo men. 

The answers to the fourth question 
were written from two points of view S) 
that neither a whole team nor a con 
comparison of individuals can Ik- forzacd 
from the answers. Some chose out stain] 
ing individuals anil others the best d 
those who played opposite by position. 
The linenunt mentioned were Crowley o: 
Norwich, Daley of C.A.C., Lyon- 
Amherst, Shank weiler of Amherst, Van 
Miller of Amherst, and Hanson of Tufts. 
Mohardt of Amherst and Converse of 
Worcester Tech were the most popular 
backs. Nanfeldt of C.A.C. and Berry of 
Springfield were the others mentioned. 

We consider that this questionnaire 
has brought out considerable interesting 
and valuable comments. Many of thiM 
suggestions will bear thinking over. 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 
Before you buy your 
Hockey Equipment, see our dis- 
play. It is worth your while. 
THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Wait 



NEW PRICES 
Men's Whole Soles. Rubber Heels 
Men's Half Soles, Rubber Heels 
Men's Rubber Soles, Rubber Heels 
Men's Half Soles • - - - - 



■ • $2.55 

. - 1.75 

. • 2.25 

. • l.M 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOUSE 
Open till 8 P.M. 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUNSINGWEAR and HEDALIA 
SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $U9 $1.75 
G. Edward Fisher 

TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 3258 



Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the best in everything 

COLLEGE SHOES 

— AT — 

TOWN PRICES 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



B. F. P. 

OOt) 

1 

2 



1 

1 1 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 

275 High St. Holyoke 

s h oe s 

— AND— 

H OS I E RV 

of Quality and Fashion for 
M. A. C. Students 



Harry B. Berman 



1920 



1 11 



DEUEL'S DRUQ STORE 

PRACTICAL GIFTS USEFUL 

Fountain Pens Pen and Pencil Sets Candies ugw 

Cigarettes Xmas Cards Make Your Selections >ow 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



B. F. P 

2 1 i 

I 2 

1 1 



1 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



FOR CHRISTMAS 

KHMPUS KOMPKCTS 
with "Massachusetts" on the lid of each 

Cigarette Cases, Rings, Bar Pins, Letter Openers, 

withM. A.C. Seal. 

Will get any book In print. Your name printed on Christmas/ "^. 



H1CKEY-FREEMAN CI THES 



THE LONGER YOU WEAR THEM 



THE MORE YOU ADMIRE THEM 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 




Here's A Way to Make Money 

After Graduation 

In Your Own College Town 

TAKE this Flower Shop at Wellesley, Mass., for example. It 
is located handy by, just outside the college grounds. 

It wasn't so long ago that all there was to it was a plain little 
frame building, with some rather diminutive green-houses hitched 
to it. 

Now the shop is a most attractive brick building, with up to 
date greenhouses, and this show house opening right off it. 

You should see the way the college girls come here and buy 
flowers! Christmas and Easter week, the Western Union brings a 
private wire right into the shop, and has an operator on the job 
to take the Florist Telegraph Delivery orders that come from 
parents and friends, for flowers to the girls. 

From one of his rose houses alone, this man took $9,000 last year. 

Doesn't all this start you thinking? 

Man alive, where is there a business as healthy, fun-filled and 
profit yielding? 

{ust the kind that to-be-wifeof yours would like, 
lad you ever stopped to think how many graduates are going 
into the greenhouse flower growing or shop business? 

Hadn't we better start in getting acquainted so you can have the 
facts. Write us. 

Ask us the hundred and one questions you have on your mind. 

// interested, write to the Mananer of 
our Service Department, SO East 42nd 
Street, A'rw York City, who will ?,ive it 
his personal attention. 



|ot^ &ljufi]hain|d 

Builders of (greenhouses and Conservatories 

Eastern Factory Western Factory Canadian Factory 

Irvington, N. Y. Des Plaines, 111. St. Catharines, Ont. 

Irvington New York Philadelphia Chicago 

Cleveland Denver Kansas City St. Louis 

Boston Buffalo Montreal Greensboro 




STUDENTS HEAR 

< oiiiliuii'ii from P;ij>»- J) 

not, thai I <li>." Commenting on this, the 
preachei went on to >.i\ thai ii one allows 
himself i«> become the slave ol his lowci 
self, Ins life will never be ol any real 
value; and described vividlj the shame ol 

such a lit*-. The preacher the ide tl>>- 

statement thai although a k 1 *'*" many 
people doubt the need "i < .<>. I in ,,m 
presenl civilization, il is only through him 
thai man's better sell can be triumi hant. 
The minister concluded lii> sermon with 
these words: "Don'l be ashamed ol 
c'hrisi; when ><iu i'ii to Him, don 1 make 
■in\ apologies; for 1 In- only \v.i\ (•• gain 
freedom from your evil sell i> to be a 
comrade and a servant of Jesus Christ." 



You Mill find an exit-Hunt 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP ... 

equipped with (lie mow! up-to-date t .midyear 

Machinery and a modern 

SIIOK SHINING PARLOR 
at II) Anilly-St., - Labrovitz Klock 

We under^liitul your rc/un tint nt'. <i •/</ are pre- 
pared /■> mul \.nir needs. 

An vara tmm*m&**i, Skoti iMata* itn./ ./,../. 

VINCENT GRANDONICO, Prop. 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 

IS AT 

DRURY'S 



College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



Ask for 



NEW 
HANDY PACK 

WRIGLEYS 



CHEWING SWEET 




lor Tour Money 




Tho Ih-st in Drug Store Men hamlise 
The Itest in Drug Store Service 
IIKNRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

77,,- %o>CcJUL Store 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



I 



H 



□ 



..-.. ^-.— . ..— -..— ■-■■■ ....... — — 

Get The Most 

^^ out of / * 

Home Grown Fea 




vV. 



m^M> 






"About ninety per cent of the etuft written about 
'The Variety of Proteins' it pure bunk. The feeder 
who hat corn, oats, milage, alfalfa, clover and pea 
hays needs only one other feed — Corn Gluten Feed." 

So declares one of our biggest authorities on feeding. 
He says that variety is a very simple thing — easy to 
understand by any farmer who knows his animals. 

The purpose of variety is to make the ration more 
palatable. If there is any other virtue in variety, you get 
it in your alfalfa, clover and other leguminous roughage. 

Feed your corn, oats, silage and clover hay — with Com 
Gluten Feed. You will then make meat or milk at the 
lowest cost per too lbs. In proper combination you get 
the variety your animals want and the protein they need. 

Beef cattle make cheaper gains on Com Gluten Feed 
than on gruin alone. Dairy cows almost double their 
yield with Corn Gluten Feed in their ration. This prac- 
tical feed lot experience can not be changed by theories. 

The price of com does not change its analysts. Sell 
some of your corn and buy Com Gluten Feed to supply 
the protein lacking in your grain. Tell us what you arc 
feeding and we will suggest the right ration for you. 

We want to help you get more out of your home grown 
feeds. Write us for advice on feeding. Get your supply 
of Corn Gluten Feed from your dealer or from any manu- 
facturer. 

Associated Corn Product* Manufacturer* 

Feed Research Department 
Hugh G. Van Pelt, Director 

208 South La Salle St., Chicago, III. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 





DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AVUiR ST. MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 




Appropriate 
. . Gifts . . 



College Seal 

CHRISTMAS CARDS 

The New College Store 



. . Merry . . 
Christmas 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Maaa 

Our Laundry First Claw 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS Or' 
WASHING IM)NE AT REASONABLE 
PRICKS. 

Opposite Pott Office 



Buy Your Christmas Presents In Amherst 

We can offer many appropriate gifts for your DAD or BROTHER 

Drop in and iook our CHRISTMAS LINE over, they will enjoy a gift from AMHERST. 

CARL H. BOLTER I "' annl8 



Amherst 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COM FG1AN, WEDNESDAY, DEC. 9. 1«25 



Town Hall, Amherst 


WtMl. 

Thurs. 

MO, 

7..M) 


Ik-ily COSBMM, Kuardo 
ioftSSi Kriu-.t Torrence and 
.V.ill.u ■ lioi r> in 

•nil PONY EXPRESS" 
i.inu's Crusa'i iucc«aaor •<> 
'The Covered Waeon" s 

hnllinu ■ nli„liil tali- of ehi- 

>ld Went. 

sews CtUn Paths Ctum-ily 


Friday 
.t.oo 

6.45, N..W 


idolph Mcnjoei IU-ss> Low 
inel i.rela N»-sm-ii in 

1 UK MM. OK MAIN 
8TREE1 " 
I'hf smoothest, smartest. 1 
■parkling comedy <»f iht-l 

year. 
SportliUht I'allu- CMM] 


Saturday 

3.00. s.45 
8.3S 


James Oliver GaWWOOsVl 
nlftht) drama «<f OSS Ureal 
4orthweel 

WHIN THE DOOR 
OPENED" 
Alih Jac«|iieline l.ojiun, 
r'rmik Keenan, and splen- 
iid cast 

News Educational Cowed; 


Mon. 

.t.oo 

6.4S H '<> 


:iare Windsor In 

TIIK DENIAL" 
i thrllllntl picture of Span- 
ish «ar ilays and today. 
:iwlr Cook in 
'"SHOULD SAILORS 
MARRY" 
Patk Review 



There will be a display of COLLEGE and FRATERNITY BANNERS, 
COVERS for the next few days— These will be sold at Christmas prices. Now's 



PENNANTS and PILLOW 

the chance to purchase one. 



YE AGGIE INN 



CHRISTMAS 
GREETING CARDS 

GIFT DRESSINGS 
PERSONAL and 

HOUSEHOLD GIFTS 
and NOVELTIES 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



We have jusl received another large 
assortment oi OVERSHOES** differenl 

prices. Avoid being loo late. 

Hosiery a Specialty 



JOHN FOTOS 

MI.K-SKRN KX SHOE ST 



ORE 



Why not buy him something he 

really wants?? 

Buy your Father, Brother or Friend a 
gift that he will wear and appreciate, and 
buy it where you are sure of getting good 
quality every time. 

Gloves, Ties, Shirts, Belts, in fact there is no 
limit to the assortment of gifts that any man 
will be glad to get. LET US SHOW YOU. 



BOSTON1ANS 

COME IN ANDLOOK OVER 

OUR NEW SHIPMENT OF 

BOSTONIAN OXFORDS 



BOLLES SHOE STORE 



MAIN STREET 



AMHERST 



NORTHAMPTON 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

WEEK OF DEC. 7th 

Paul Hansel), Presents 

Tbe Northampton Repertory Company 

IN 

"The Naughty Wife" 

A Farce by Jackson and Selwyn 



Eveniag* at B.UJ Bat. Mat. at S4A 

Prices: BOc. to SI . 10. (iuiludiu. 

Phone y.i'> 



NEXT WEEK "APRIL" 
A new play by < Hive Lethbridge 

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success will depend upon cutting down this item 
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the cheapest digestible, milk-making protein, in 
other words the most protein, of the right kind, 
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brawn of all the workers of the world would fait to supply the power 
_ J for our construction and production requirements. Modem civilisation 
it baaed on cheap power readily applied to tasks of all kinds. 



Machinery works: Man thinks 



According to college tests, man develops one-eighth 
horsepower for short periods and one-twentieth in 
steady work. As a craftsman — a worker who uses 
brains— he is well worth his daily wage. But as a 
common laborer, matching brawn against motor- 
ized power, he is an expensive luxury. 

With a fifty-horsepower motor, for instance, one 
man can do the work of 400 common laborers. He 
is paid far more for his brains than his brawn. 

The great need of this and future generations is 
for men who can plan and direct. There is ample 
motorized machinery for all requirements of pro- 
duction and construction. But motorized machinery* 
no matter how ingenious, can never plan for 
itself. 

And, that is precisely where the college man comes 
in. Highly trained brains are needed more and 
more to think, plan, and direct tasks for the 
never-ending application of brawn-saving elec- 
tricity. 



In most long-established 
industries the General 
Electric Company has 
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And in many new indus- 
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A new series of G-E adver- 
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SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



LIBRARY oi " 
ft/1 c i. actv 

JA.l|- 

icflJtural 



Sfo jUaflHarfrttflgttfi (ftoUfgfmt 



Vol. XXXVI. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JAN. 6, 1926 



No. 11 



Original Production 

Proves Successful 

"Doris" Presented as This Year's Aggie Revue. Dancing Acts 

Receive Much Applause 



\ feature, entirely different from that 
pen nted in the Aggie Revues during the 
pga) \cars, was embodied in the Aggie 
Bevue of this year, presented in Bow h er 
Auditorium on Saturday evening, Dec 
12. This new feature was a musical 
comely in two acts entitled "Doris". 
Xht music was written by Harry E. 
Prater '20 of Jamaica Plain, the plot by 
Marv T. Boyd '26 of Ortega, Florida, 
an ,l the dancing directed by Harold K. 
Astell '29 of C.rantwood, New Jersey. 

The entire cast was selected from the 
1km -indent talent in the college. Each 
member of the cast acted his part well 
and is worthy of unlimited praise. Every 
f jmea with the exception of '27 was repre- 
sented on the cast by at least two mem- 
bers, The cast was as follows: 

Doris Wilson, the holiday hostess 

Marion S. Cassidy "2(\ 

Diet Lane, the hero Roy E. Norcross '26 

I, Doris's jealous sister . Miriam 11. Muss '29 
Bob Blake, smooth and snakey 

P. Raymond Plummer '29 

l'ti.t < irrington Emery S. Loud '26 

Mr* i .miiiKton. an entomologist 

Evelyn L. Davis L'<> 
Jim E d w ard* , a comedian James M Richards '26 
rtani' I > < onner, a dancer . . Harold K. Ans<ll 'L*.l 

Julia, a maid Anne E. Himhey '29 

Wortbingtoa, the hutler . Kenneth A. Bartlett '2.S 

In addition to these members there was 
a mixed chorus of sixteen memberi which 
tdded spice and vim to the whole per- 
(iirniaiiee. The members of the choru> 
wen Elate K. Nickerson '2(i, Frances ('. 
Bruce '27, Ruth II. Barber '28, Franco 
I rhoanpeoa '2X, Cuila (1. Hawley *29, 
Helen.- II. Tufts '29, Arthur B. Hill '2(i. 
Janus F. Burnham '2(i, Thomas \V. 
Fergueoa '38, Philip E. Wilcox '28. 
Elhnrd H. Nichols '29, and John If. 
Kepi '29. Besides the chorus there 
wire several other s|X'cialty acts. Janet 
M. Junes '29 presentetl very ably a 
:.il Spanish dance. The principal 
-IHcialty was a dance by Marion S. 
My and Harold K. Ansell. This ex- 
hibition received hearty applause from 
the audience and an encore was granted. 

This is the first time since 191.'j that a 
musical comedy has been presented as 
the A«gie Revue. Twelve years ago a 
musical comedy entitled "Pluto's Daugh- 
ter", which was also written by an Aggie 
■tadent, was given. A great deal of time 
(Continued on Pat* 2) 



Frosh Hoop Card 
Nearly Ready 

Eight Games Have Already Been 
Arranged for 1929 Quintet. 



The freshman basketball schedule is 
mirk finished. At present there are 
tis'ht game* and two dates to be filled. 
The si liedule is as follows: 
Jan. 8 — Attleboro, here 
13— Open 
1® — Open 

23 — Springfield Evening H. S. 
27 — Turners Falls, here 
•i — Greenfield, here 
10 — Deerfield, there 
19 — Turners Falls, there 
2( >— Arlington (Vt.) H. S., here 
24 — Hopkins, there 



Feb 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Thursday— 
vanity basketball. M.A.C. vs. 
Norwich at M.A.C. 

ernity basketball. Alpha Sigma 
Phi vs. Theta Chi. Kappa Gamma 
Phi vs. Non-Fraternity. 
Friday— 
1 I • m. Social Union entertainment. 

De Jen Novelty Company. 
rr «, ernity basketball. Q.T.V. vs. 
I ambda Chi Alpha. Kappa Epsi- 
km vs. Delta Phi Alpha. 
1 ' liman basketball. Attleboro H. 
wot, here. . 
Saturday — 
Va ry hotkey. M.A.C. vs. M.I.T. 
M.A.C. 

"y basketball. M.A.C. vs. 
VV.P.I. at Worcester. 
Sunday — 

i. ra. Sunday chapel. Speaker, 
1 ipal Alfred E. Stearns of 
over. 




FIRST HOCKEY GAME 
COMES THIS SATURDAY 



Three Letter Men on Team Which 
Meets M.I.T. Sextet. 



With three letter men, Capt. "Buddy" 
Moberg, Royal Potter, and Cary Palmer, 
back from last year's sextet, prospects of 
a favorable successful hockey season 
appear imminent. Favored by good ice, 
the first members of the squad reported 
on New Year's Day to Coach "Red" Ball 
for the initial practice, and the number 
trying out for the team has steadily in- 
creased to about twenty-five, the largest 
group to appear in recent years. 

Among the candidates for the sextet 
are six memliers of last year's freshman 
team, prominent among whom are Paul 
Frese and "Joe" Forest, who will make 
competition keen for some of the upper- 
classmen. The final lineup for the season 
is far from settled, but present indications 
are that the above-mentioned five men 
will lie among the players to take the ice 
against M.I.T. in the initial game which 
cornea here on Saturday. 



DO YOU KNOW 



That the educational policy of the 
College is determined mil by the President 
and Trustees but by the Commission on 
Administration and Finance which con- 
trols salaries, the filling of vat am its, and 
i In establishment of new positions. 

That the salary of every eacher, re- 
search worker, extension specialist and 
other employee is fixed by the Commis- 
sion on Administration and Finance. 

That no vacancy can be filled except on 
the basis of a requisition approved by the 
Commission on Administration and Fi- 
nance, which fixes the salary at which 
the new employee shall l>e engaged. 

That able men selected by the Presi- 
dent and Trustees for important pmilhwM 
on the teaching staff have declined to 
come to the institution in part because of 
the control exercised by the State House. 

That the control exercised by the Com- 
mission on Administration and Finance 
has been used even to the extent of dis- 
continuing a position long established 
without consultation with the President 
or the Trustees. 

That the rate of pay for skilled and un- 
skilled labor is faced by the Commission on 
Administration and Finance. 

That because of the authority exercised 
by the Commission on Administration 
and Finance, the Trustees have been 
unable to spend funds for personal ser- 
vice specifically appropriated for such by 
the Legislature. 

That it has been relatively easy to 
secure additional personnel in the depart- 
ments which in the opinion of the Com- 
mission on Administration and Finance 
represent what that body thinks to be 
the real work of the College while it has 
been exceedingly difficult to secure addi- 
tions in those departments with which the 
Department is not in sympathy. 

That the Executive is obliged to secure 
the approval of the Commission on Ad- 
ministration and Finance before he may- 
employ emergency or substitute teachers. 

That the Executive has to submit 
through the Commissioner of Education 
all official communications addressed to 
the Attorney General and other state 
officials. 

That the approval of the Commissioner 
of Education is required on all requisitions 
for personal service, on all appointments 
to the staff, on all schedules of bills and 
on the annual budget. 

That "very important decision of the 
Tru r • a :oncerning institutional policy is 
su'ie lo veto by the Commission on 
Administration and Finance or by the 
Commissioner of Education or by both. 
— Alumni Bulletin. 



COLLEGIAN BOARD 

REORGANIZES AGAIN 

Newly Elected Members Assigned to 
Departments of Editorial Board. 

The editorial board of the COUBOI IM 
was partially reorganized al its regular 
meeting last Monday eight. Mary T. 
Boyd '2<> will continue to head the board 
as the Editor-in-Chief and will Ik- assisted 
by John F. Lambert '2li as Managing 
Editor. 

William L. Dole '27 will serve in his 
former position as athletic editor. Mis 
assistants will be Harold L. Clark '2S and 
L. Rockwell Smith, Jr. '28. The Alumni 
department was re-established and will be 
in charge of Josephine Panzica '28. 

Frnest L. Spencer '28 was elected head 
of the Campus department. He will be 
assisted by Ellsworth Barnard '28, Ed- 
ward H. Nichols '29 and William R. 
Phinney '29. The other departments will 
be as follows: Co-ed, Frances C. Bruce 
'27; and Faculty, VV. Gordon Hunter '29. 



Spring Track Team 

To Have Six Meets 



Four Dual Conflicts on Schedule 
Besides Eastern and New England 
Intercollegiates. 



The spring track team will FffffiptN in 
four dual meets next spring in addition 
to the Eastern Intercollegiates and the 
New Fngland Intercollegiates. J. Finer 
son Circcnaway '27, is the manager this 
vearwith Frank St rat ton 38, 00 a---M.ini. 
I lie schedule is as follows: 
Apr. 24 — Tufts, here 
May 1 — Middlebury, there 
8 — Norwich, then 
15 — Eastern Intercollegiates 

at Worcester 
22 — New England Intercollegiates 

at Providem C 
29 — New Hampshire, here. 



Versailles Treaty 

Condemned by Barry 

Springfield Minister Gives Picture of 
League and Locarno Pact at Assem- 
bly. Blames State of Europe to 
Short Sigh ted ness of Peace Treaty. 



A very clean-cut picture of Euro|>can 
politics, as they were at the close of the 
war, and as they are today, was given by 
Rev. J. Purford Barry of Springfield, 
who was the s|x-akcr at the final A— em 
bly of the term cm December 10. Rev. 
Mr. Marry, has s|>cnt considerable time 
in Furope during recent sears, and s|>okc 
from first-hand knowledge of conditions 
there. He said that the wretched State of 
Europe during the peat few years has 
been due entirety to the injustice of the 
Versailles Treaty, which was drawn up 
by politicians in defiance of the advice 
Of experts in tcononiy. The treaty, he 
stated, was drawn up by the representa- 
tives of five great nations, four of whom 
were bent on obtaining from < iermany 
everything possible, while the fifth, who 
was the greatest political idealist whom 
the world has ever known, asked nothing. 

In his following remarks the s|>caker 
condemned the attitude of Premier 
Mussolini of Italy, and told how the 
plans of the latter with regard to Gr e ece 
in the dispute over the island of Corfu, 
were frustrated by the public opinion 
expressed at the Assembly of the League 
of Nations, at which the speaker was 
present. Following his description of the 
workings of the League (which he did not 
mention by name,), Rev. Mr. Barry gave 
an exceedingly vivid picture of the 
signing of the Security Pact at Locarno, 
explaining just what the pact is, and how 
it will bring peace and prosperity to 
Europe. 

ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

MEMBERS ELECTED 



The following men have been recently 
elected as the new members of the 
Athletic Council: 1920, John B. Temple 
of Shelburnc Falls, and Herbert E. 
Moberg of Brockton; 11)27, Clarence A. 
Crooks of North Brookfield, and Fdwin 
J. Haertl of Jamaica Plain; 192S, Mario 
Capone of Chelsea, and John F. Quinn 
of New Bedford; 1920, Clifton R. Johnson 
of Worcester, and Kenneth F. McKittrick 
of Boston. 



Varsity Quintet Opens 

Season with Norwich 

Cadets Have Already Played Five Games. Agates Journey to 

Worcester on Saturday 




JOHN B. TEMPLE '2b 



Winter Track 

Practice Starts 



Captain Sniff en is Only Letter Man 
on Relay Team. 



Winter track has started with a little 

informal practice and .is soon as the 

weather will permit and the track which 

has undergone its annual overhauling can 

be pul in condition regular workouts will 

be in order. Captain Suiffen is the 

nucleus lor the lel.is team this tall with 
lb nneberry and Foley last year's alter- 
nate and sixth man res|>cctivcly as tin- 
only other candidates who are left from 

last year's squad. Hall, Schappette, and 

Campbell, all sophomores, arc- promising 
looking timber however. Others who li.i\e 
reported are Spclman, Snyder, and Read. 
The team will run its first scheduled race 
against the B. V. quartet at the K. of C. 
meet, January .'<(). The team is entered 
in the B.A.A. games on February (i and 
will probably run against Amherst and 
Bates. The final event of the season will 
be an indoor meet at Worcester against 
the W.P.I, track team. 



1926 FOOTBALL 

SLATE COMPLETED 

Williams Scheduled in Place of Nor- 
wich. Thanksgiving Came Dis- 
carded. Majority on Home Field. 



The M.A.C. football schedule for 10ft 
has been completed. Manager Hanson 
has arranged seven games, four of which 

will Itc played on Alumni Field. Bates 

leads off, followed by Connecticut Aggie 
and Williams. Norwich has been dropped 

and Williams whom the Aggies did not 
play last Call have been put M the sched- 
ule. Springfield has been retained alllioug 

it has been shifted to November fl in- 
stead of Thanksgiving Dzy which was 
not a popular date last fall. 
The schedule follows: 
Oct. 2 — Bates here 
9— C.A.( . here 
It) — Williams there 
B— W.P.I, here 
:ii) — Amherst here 
Nov. 6 — Springfield there 

2o— Tufts there- 



Wrestling and Boxing 

For Football Men 



Hall and Shumway will Conduct 
Classes During the Winter. First 
Session to Come Tomorrow. 



Mr. Ralph Hall, a member of the 
Forestry Department at M.A.C. and 

formerly a member of the wrestling team 
at Syracuse University, has consented to 
coach candidates for wrestling during the- 
winter term. George Shumway "2.'i has 
a< ee-pted the (Ktsition of bejxing instrue tor 
for those desiring recreation in that line. 
The first se-ssion is se hid tiled for Thursday 
the 7th. The wrestling mate lies will 
take- place- in the Sodal Union rooms, 
while the boxing bouts will be- held in the 
baseuient of North ("olle-ge. 

(Continued on Page 2) 



The varsity basketball season QpeM to- 
morrow night when the Agates meet | In- 
Norwich live in the Drill Hall. Since there 
vs.is no practice during the Christinas 
recess the team may not Ik- in as gocxl 
condition as it will be later on hut if 
practices earlier in the week are any 
indication their epaad will not be in the 
least diminishi-el. I'artenhe-iinei , Smiley, 
anel Captain Temple are a formidable 
trio which must certainly show some 
llashy work. Partenheimer and Temple 
are playing in the forward positions. 
Both these men were given places in 
Spaulding's All-New Fnglanel five. Smiley 
is slated to play defense ami with his 
clever lloor work he should ha formidable 
both offensively and defensively. The 
three remaining |x>sitions will probably 
Ik- filled by two of the group, Jones, 
Munloiigh, and Thomas who have- l.ce n 
alternating in various combiii.it ions. Jones 
is the only lette r man of the group anel he 
makes a good umlci the basket defense 
with his long arms anel general altituele. 
Murdotigh, a junior, who was a regular 
substitute last year has been alternating 
at eente-r and elelense. Thomas, one of 
the freshmen's duel assets last year, 
looks gooel in pre -season practice. 

Norwich has already played hvagaaaai 

with St. Michaels, Williams, Trinity, 
loidham, and Savage School eil Ne-vv 
York I'lunile-v ami ( alde-rwood, for- 
waidl ■ (he latter men who will prob- 
ably si. ul the game with the |m.ss||,|,. 
addition of Molten. Bedell, a transfer 
li Coimi-ctieut will probably start at 

center and riagaa and Afanl are- fHpwted 

to flash from the- back court ■ Norwich 
had a wealth ol mate-ii.il this year from 
which to pie k a te-am and the- cadets 
believe they have one which will tax the 
Agates to their utmost. 

On Saturday, the Maroon and White 
will meet the Worcester Tee h live- at 
Weireester. The Crimson and Gray U-at 
the New Bedford Textile- ciuiiitc-t in their 
initial game. The Fngineers have five 
letter men arounel which tej I. ml. I a iiain. 

< aptain ( iross is ineligible but aaaong tba 

other vete-rans are Parsons, (.allup, 
(alder, Kimball, anel Bit titer. Then- 
sieins to Im- a wealth eif material for the 
forward ImtiIis im biding, in addition to 
Parsons, (.allup, and Kimball, two ne-w 
men Ne-ubauer and Harris. Parsons how- 
ever is versatile- aeln he with (alder inaki- 
a wonderful pair to play elefe-sm-. Parsons 

has played in all poertione since- he started 

doing eluty for W.P.I., playing guard one 
season and alternate- eente-r ami forwarel 
for the- last two. Tech l» lie-ves they have- 
one of the best f jiiiiit «-t s they have- had in 
years to represent it this winter. 



AMHERST SLATED FOR 
COMMENCEMENT GAME 



Sixteen Baseball Games Arranged 
for 1926. Dartmouth, Williams, and 
New Hampshire Scheduled. Only 
Five Games at Home. 



The baseball schedule for 192o has been 
Completed Co mp ris in g sixteen games in- 
cluding trips to Dartmouth, Union, New 
Hampshire, and Ve-rmont. There are 
however only five games on home terri- 
tory but the Commencement game- with 
Amherst should be- a popular innovation. 
The- se he-dule- follows: 

Apr. 17 — Williams here- 
24— Tufts here 
SB -W. P. I. there 
May 1 — Wesleyan here 

4 — Dartmouth there 
li bowdoin here * 

S — Union there- 
14 — Lowell lextile- 

i "» New Hampshire 

10 Wesleyan there 
23 -Aiiihe-rst t he-re 
2H-Middl.-bury there 
L".» Vermont then- 
June- 4 — Springfield there 

II— Conn. Aggie- there 
12 — Amherst here 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. JAN. 6, 1926 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOAKD OF EDITORS 

Editor-in-Chief 
Managing Editor 



Mary T. Boyd '26 
Jqhn F. Lambert '26 



Editorial 
Cider Prew 

Athletics 



Campus Newi 



Co-Ed Newt 

Alumni 
Faculty Newt 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Mary T. Boyd '26 

Mary T. Boyd '26 

William L. Dole '27 

Harold L. Clark '28 

L. Rockwell Smith, Jr. '28 

Ernest L. Spencer '28 

Ellsworth Barnard '28 

Euwaku 11. Nichols. 29 

William R. Phinney. '2<t 

Frances C. Bruce '27 

Josephine Panzica '28 

W. Gordon Hunter '29 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 
Alvin G. Stevens '26 Business Manager 

Edwin A. Wilder'28 Advertising Mana 

Lewis H. Whitaker '27 

John E. White '27 

Douglas W. Losing '28 

Charles F. Clagg '27 



Circulation Manager 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as oecond-clawi matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for "»«»«■ »J»«f c , la l f ',*,*" 
of postage provided for in section IHB. Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



Proposed Rules 

"We would also inaunuialr <'>«• follow- 
ing rules within the college*: 

1. Thai graduatiagcoacfciag systems be 

instituted, and that no coach paid a 

■alary beyond that of a protestor; aad 

2. That couches Ik' not allowed to Mt 
on the players' bench during the game, 
hut that captains alone direct their 
teams so that undergraduates would he 
playing undergraduates and not coaches 
playing coaches." 

"The resolution was endorsed by dele- 
gates from nine colleges — Dartmouth, 
Harvard, Tufts, Trinity, Bowdoin, Wil- 
liams, Connecticut Agricultural College, 
Wesleyan, Princeton. The delegates were 
editors of student papers, student govern- 
ment officials. While their action does 
not commit student bodies their influence 
on student opinion is great. 

"Discussion of intercollegiate football 
will not hesitate at this point. The 
FlStsm Intercollegiate Debate League, 
composed of nine colleges, will take up 
the subject. The Harvard Debating 
Union recently questioned the over 
emphasis of football. By a vote of L'l.") 
to 2(M) it decided that the game was 
being overemphasized." 




Football and the Parley 

It will possibly be remembered that 
editorial mention of the Wesleyan Parley | waters ait still 



was made a few weeks ago. This Parley, 
attended by delegates from nine colleger 
took into serious consideration the (pies 
tion of the present trend in intercollegiate 
football. Ltd by Art Howe, Vale 'IS 
All-American fullback, the conference 
almost unanimously agreed thai football 
was being over-emphasized in American 
colleges today. The resolutions pro- 
posed by the conference we quote from 
"The New Student": 

Purpose of the Parley 
"This parley was called for under- 
graduate consideration of how the pur- 
pose Of the Amciican college can best be 
furthered, granted that the purpose is 
primarily the training o4 the mind.' 

•A civ subordinate to this purpose is 
athletic-. All Intercollegiate athletics eras 

incidental to their origin and should h;\w 

remained so in their growth. We believe 

in them; becau-c tin > encourage friend- 
ship between coOeges and (otter unity 
within institutions. But one sport, foot- 
ball, has takm such a hold on under- 
graduate*, alumni and the public that its 

importance over the courses of the play- 
ing teuton looms larger than any other 
aspect of the college, especially over the 
primary aspect— intellectual thinking. 

Obviating Features 

"We believe that this situation would 

1„. obviated largely by the cottages 

scheduling only lour games each season, 
each game with a team in its own class 
ami in its own vicinity. 

"The reasons which lead us to this con- 
clusion are: 

1. Schedules of only four games would 
render impossible the present annual 
elimination contests among the teams of 
the country, and consequently would 
render impossible the choice of mythical 
national and even sectional champions. 
Many teams would remain undefeated 
instead of a few. 

2. With this aspect removed, less pub- 
licity would be given the game by the 
press and the public imagination would 
not be whetted so that the fever of 
interest would be forced up within under- 
graduate bod it S. 

M. The necessity for spring and carl\ 
season training would Ik- done away with, 
since the four games would be played on 
successive week-ends beginning late in 
October. Practice, as at present, could 
start two or three weeks before the first 

game. 

4. The desc ends of interest, at present, 

extending over eight games, would be 
limited to four games; and so the large 
percentage of attention given football 
now would be lessened by the cutting 
down of the length of the season. 

."). Colleges playing teams only in their 
own class and vicinity would minimize 
the commercial aspect of schedule making; 
and no small college teams would be called 
Upon to sacrifice themselves in order to 
make money for their institutions as at 
present. This altruistic motive given lor 

these set-up games, the making of money 

to support other sports, is in no sense a 
defense for football. Appropriate taxes on 

u n dergradu ates would serve i nste a d , it 

such a Step were necessary. 



For the New Year 

An educated man is known by the 
silences he keeps. 

Ignorance may often be concealed by a 
vague discursiveness. Wisdom, however, 
is self-sufficient, and needs no verbal 
embroidery. Still waters, they tell us, 
run deep. It is equally true that deep 
In general the shallower 



Song for January 

Note: — This originally appeared in Life 
undor the title of " D ec em ber Folk-Song", 
but the gentle north-easters and crisp 
exhilerating slushes of January make it 
pecuharty applicable just now. Also — 
most of us hold memories of sophomore 
English and that musical ornithological 
specimen with the unreasonable spelling. 
Therefore we take great pleasure in pre- 
senting: 

A Folk-Song 

Winter is icumen in, 
Loud sing kerchoo! 

Falleth snow, and stalleth car, 

And slippeth the foot noo, 
Sadly sing kerchoo. 

Yanisheth coal from bin, 

Catch children all the flu, 
Plumbing freezeth, wife sneezeth, 

Ever sjng kerchoo! 

Kerchoo, kerchoo, sing we all kerchoo! 
Wise man goeth Southe noo. 
Kerchoo, kerchoo, sing bitter kerchoo! 
— Richard L. Greene. 



AT THE ABBEY 



A daughter was born December :!.">, 
1925, to Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Bennett. 
Mrs. BritaiH was Aimee < iasjJOf of the 
class of '21. 

M 

Anne Hinchey '2 l .t, is at her home in 
Palmer recuperating from a recent opera- 
tion for appendicitis. 

M 

The engagement has been announced of 
Margaret (ireenleaf ex'27, and Russell 
Noyes '24. 

M 

Isobel Corey, a former Abbey "inmate", 
is spending a few days on campus. 

M 

The engagement of Elizabeth Pomeroy 
'26, and Chester Kicker '24, has been 
announced. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



'OX Clifton L. Flint has set up i n 
business as a landsta|>e architect with 
offices at 1409 Marin Avenue, Bet 
( alitornia. 

'2t> Harry E. Fraser has anno 
his engagement to Miss Helen Re i 
of Everett, Mass. 

'88 "Red" Sullivan of Amherst, thrio) 
winner of the football "M", who gained 
fame for his off-tackle dashes, i 
teaching and assisting coaching at l)., r . 
field Academy. 



TWO YEAR FOOTBALL 

MEN GET INSKAIA 



SOPHOMORES WIN 

CLASS CHAMPIONSHIP 



1928 Quintet Undefeated in Inter- 
class Basketball Series. 



-CP 



the brook, the louder its chatter. 

All of which is by way of suggesting 
that we, as college men and therefore pre- 
sumably educated men, will do well to 
look to our silences. We are all taught 
the virtue of "Unity, coherence, and 
emphasis" our first year at college. Of 
these, coherence is perhaps the first 
essential, and the soul of coherence is 
brevity. Our whole college training 
shows the importance and the necessity 
of looking carefully to the Unity, coher- 
ence, and emphasis (and brevity) of our 
written and oral work — for we are par- 
ticularly fortunate here in that only a 
very few of our professors base their 
marks on the quantity rather than the 

cotsriteneat and quality of work. 

The ability to know definitely what is 
to be said, to say it clearly, and then to 
stop, is an attribute primarily of the 
trained mind. In the main we are judged 
by what we say — and by what we re- 
frain from saving. The least we can do 
is to guard against the windy ver b osity 
that is so characteristic of the ignorant. 

This applies particularly to those 
occasions when a story is to be told, 
whether it be to one man or to the whole 
college. Unless the objective of a story 
is well defined in the mind before the 
tongue is unleashed, the result is apt to 
Ir' as chaotic as Mark Twain's classic 

story of "Grandfather's Old Ram", 

which meandered happily along from an 
initial mention of the ram, and ended 
with the sad story of the old gentleman 
who carelessly got himself woven into 
several yards of carpeting, and thereby- 
caused his widow some concern as to the 
pro [xt mode of burial. 

That story, however, was amusing. 
Most of our digressions are not. For the 
New Year, then, we should if possible 
cultivate the habit of wise silences. 



ORIGINAL PRODUCTION 
(Continued from Pate 1) 

was spent by those in charge in working 
up the individual parts and in making 
the performance a success. Those in 
charge of the entertainment were Theo- 
dore J. (irant '2ti, Margaret C. Shea '2H, 
Philip N. Dow '26, Mary T. Boyd '21'., 
Harry E. Fraser '26, and Harold K. 
Ansell '20. The music was furnished by 
Moon Mullen's Melodious Music Makers 
under the supervision of "Eddie" Haertl 
'27. 

Following the entertainment a dance 
was given for the cast in Memorial Hall. 
Many couplet were attracted as well as 
several Stag*. Dancing lasted until 10.4o. 



So This is Botany ! 

or 

The Student Indulges in a Little 

Spiritous Research 

First Student — Lipase! Lipase! What the 
deuce is lipase? 

Second Student — That's the enzyme 
which splits sugar into carbon dioxide 
and alcohol. I can figure out where the 
carbon dioxide goes to, but what can the 
trees do with alcohol? 

First Student — That's probably what 
makes them sway they way they do. 

CP 

Boston ! 
Ever since the sad day when we met a 
Harvard professor's three year old son, 
and found that he didn't talk exclusively 
in monosyllables, and the just as sad day 
when we were served better beans in 
( >shkosh than we had ever eaten in 
Beantown, we have scornfully laughed at 
the "Boston Myth", and sternly refused 
to believe anything the funny papers said 
— except that Boston streets were laid 
out by I gentleman all too familiar with 
the contours of a corkscrew. 

But we are not one of the strong silent 
characters you read about in book-, who 
refute to admit they are wrong. We take 
it all back. We be li eve in fairies again. 
From now on we will Ix-lieve anything we 
are told about Boston, even stories about 
the precocious Boston infants. 

And why? Because we had a porter a 
few days ago — a plain or garden variety- 
red-cap, — who said to us, when we asked 
him in our uncultured Bostonese manner, 
"Want the 12 noon train for Amherst," 
"Pardon me, but I fear that you have 
Ix-en misinformed. Should you not desire 
to consult the man at the information 
bureau?", and then add, when we weakly- 
replied that wc should, encourage us with 
"Not at all. It is our privilege to rectify 
the occasional mistake of a passenger." 
Well, well! 

CP 

Happy Thought for 1926 

The best way to make time pass quickly 
is to buy something on the installment 
plan. 

CP 



The sophomore basketball team over- 
whelmed the freshman quintet by a score 
of 42 to Hi in the final game of the inter- 
class series played on December 11. By 
virtue of four straight victories the 
sophomore quintet has undisputed title to 
the interclass championship. The greatest 
factor in the final game was the excellent 
teamwork displayed by the winners. The 
other game played on the same night re- 
sulted in a victory for the Two Years, 
who won their first game by overcoming 
the seniors, 14 to 9. Two very close ex- 
hibitions took place on December H, the 
(Continued on Pate i) 



Nine of Fifteen Letter 
Graduate This Year. 



Men Win 



Ask for 



NEW 
HANDY PACK 

WRIGLEYS 



CHEWING SWEET 



Nine of the fifteen men recently awardai 
Two Year Insignia for playing on the 
Shorthorn football team are seniors. 
They are Burgevin, Johnson, M 
Prouty, Shelnut, Truelson, Tribe, Ander- 
son, and Manager Sawyer. Two Yi, ir 
freshmen who received their letter- tit 
Burrill, (atfrey, Lovejoy, Kellev . R 
and Yiale. Upon this nucleus of six letter 
men, Coach "Red" Ball will establish hi, 
li)2f> team. 

TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Ltmbda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 3258 

S. S. HYDE 

Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight) 

Oculists Prescriptions Filled. Broken tenia 
accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable makes 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 

275 High St. Holyoke 




s h oe S 

— AND— 

H O S I E R Y 

of Quality and Fashion for 
M. A. C. Students 

Harry B. Herman, 19» 



HM 

More lor Tour Money 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUNS1NGWEAR aid MEDALIA 
SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $L39 $1.75 
G. Edward Fisher 



COLLEGE SHOES 

— AT — 

TOWN PRICES 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



The Flivver Vindicated 

In this age of Ford jokes and Flivver 
disparagement, it is refreshing to read the 
candid opinion of a motor car merchant 
who frankly advertises: 

"No car is better than a Buick." 
Come, come, them is harsh woids. In 
rainy weather perhaps, wouldn't even a 
Buick be better than no car at all? 

CP 



WRESTLING AND BOXING 

(Continued from Page 1) 
All pro spe ctive candidates for football 
who are not taking part in major sport > 
this term will be required to report for 

one of the above pastimes, but tbc chutes 

arc open to all students who wish to gain 

some training in these two sports at well 

at profitable recreation. 



'26 Walter F. Mahoney recently re- 
turned from a visit to France where he 
hat been studying economic conditions. 



Those Resolutions 

On the first day of January, 1926, I, 
John Student, of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, solemnly make the 
following resolutions. I resolve to 

1. Never go to class unprepared. 

2. Always pay strict attention to what my 

dear teachers tell me. 
.1. Keep awake in Assembly. 
4. Never cut classes. 
.">. Study every night but Saturday. 
8. Attend the movies not more than once 

a week. 
7. Do all my outside reading. 

s. Keep off the grass. 

<>. Keep off the Dean's Board. 

10. Keep none of these resolutions. 



ALL SET FOR THE NEW YEAR! 

CLEARANCE PRICES ON ALL SUITS 
AND OVERCOATS 

Buy your overcoat now and save just twenty 
per cent, on the regular price. Our assort- 
ment is good and it will be to your advant- 
age to look them over. 



F. M. Thompson & Son 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 6. 1926 




The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 



IS AT 



DRURY'S 



College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



HlCKEY-FREEMAN Customized Clothes- 

have to be correct to meet the requirements of the kind of men who wear them and the 
tailors who make them. M ore than a Toggery 
A College Institution 



The Itesi in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Heat in Druft Store Service 
IIKNRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



SOPHOMORES WIN 

(Continued from Pafte 3) 

seniors nosing out the freshmen !>y the 
dose margin of 2.'* to 22, while one foul 
shot spelled the difference between the 
juniors and the Two Years, the former 
gaining the verdict, 14 to IS, 

Thomas, captain of the 1 ( .»28 quintet 
was high scorer during the season with a 
total of 43 point-, in four games, hut he 
was closely followed by Reed '28, forward 
on the same team, who had only five 
points less. Griffin '27 was the next in 
line with a total of 28. Summaries and 
final standings are as follows: 







Final Standing 










w 




L 




lVt 


mi 




4 




5 




1 000 


1926 




j 




■2 




.".Oil 


Htl'7 




•J 




■J 




:,oo 


19L'!t 




1 




I 




. 333 


I Vr. 




1 




:t 




. :i.i:i 






1 trailing Scorers 












B 




t 


l* 


Thomai '28 




lit 




;> 


i.i 


Reed 


•_N 




17 




4 


■ 


Griffin 


tl 




If 




1 


'_N 


Krlv> 


■li\ 




1 




1 


SO 


J enact 


41 




■ 




.1 


Ml 



'Continued on Pafle 4) 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 

The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST fc DEACON. Props. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 



You will And an eicellant 

. . .shoe repairing WOP ... 

equipped with the moil up- lo-date Goodyear 

Machinery and a modern 

SHOE SHINING PAKI.OH 
at II) Amlty-St.. . I.abrovltz lilock 

11V umlffituHil your rrqutrrmtul\ and art prt- 

pared It mtel your HcfilY 

Ml uurk iiuaroHtftii. .sAi>r> \hintd and dytd. 

VINCENT (.KWIidMCO, Prop. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Wait 



NEW PRICKS 
Men's Whole Soles. Rublier Heels 
Men'* Hall Sties. Rubber Heed 
Men's Riihhrr Soles, Rubber Heeli 
Men's Half S>les 



12.55 

I.7S 



Work Guaranteed— AM 11 KRST HOUSE 
Open till K I'. M. 



1 




Suppose 



SUPPOSE Purina Mills were set down overnight in your 
own home town. Suppose every feeder should suddenly find 

— mighty machines to relieve him of the 
hard work of mixing his own ration 

— grain buyers who know where and when 
to buy 

— a staff of chemists to test each ingredient 
for quality and again test the finished product 
to see that it is balanced according to formula 

— a service organization to show him how 
to get the most from his home grown grains 
and roughage. 

"Wouldn't it be wonderful if this service cost him only a 
little more than the price of the ingredients? Wonderful? 
No more wonderful than the service Purina already gives 
your own home town. 

There is a great Purina Mill near every town. The Purina 
dealer and field man in your town bring Purina service to 
your back door. 

Next time you visit St. Louis, East St Louis, Buffalo, Fort 
Worth, Kansas City, Nashville, or Minneapolis, drop in and 
see how Purina is doing for the feeder exactly what he 
would do for himself if he had a mill in his ^backyard. 

PURINA MILLS, St. Louis, Missouri 




uwwwwtfvww 




FREE 

CRANK CASE 

SERVICE for 

FOUNTAIN PENS 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

{SUPPLY LIMITED) 

The New College Store 



M BUILDING 



SPECIAL THINGS 

for 
Special Students 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Man 

Our ..aundry First Clan* 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AM) ALL KINDS OF 
WASIIIM, HONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICKS. 

Oppoalte Post Office 



WELCOME BACK TO AMHERST 

No, this Florida weather isn't going to last. Prepare now for real snappy winter by getting into one of our snappy OVERCOATS and 

snap your fingers at JACK FROST. 

Amherst CARL H. BOLTER Hyannis 









Town Hall, Amherst 



W. (iritliih's production 
"THAT ROW.K <;IKI 



Wed. 
Thurs. 

3.H. 

7.3* 



P 
the fsflMMM <:<iMiio|Mililan 

novel i>\ Bdwia Pslmse. wsU 

known Sal. Eva. I'i>s' wrlu-r. 
With ■ ram Including Carol 
I >«■■■■ l> .tei . Ilarrlsoei Ford, 
W. C. Hi-Ms and Jume-s 
Kirkwemd. An aiuii/inftly 
ii uiiiiiii pit t ur»- of I iff today 
iii i irtU-H thai bonier on Ihe 
underworld of a Ureal Amer- 
ican illy. 

News 
tables Sennet t Comedy 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 6, 1926 

NOTE BOOKS PAPER STATIONERY 



ALL THE NECESSARY EQUIPMENT TO START THE NEW TERM 

YE AGGIE INN = 



Friday 

3.00 
6.45, 8.30 



"Till. 
ANCIKNT MAKINKK" 

liased on Samuel Taylor Co 
lei id lie's poem. The cant 
Includes I'uul I'an/er.Cladys 
Itiu. knell, Clara Bow and 
Karl Williams. 
Sporillflht Ralph Graves 

< aimed y 



PEPP1E POSTERS! 

To illustrate your letters 
Brand new! 



SOPHOMORES WIN 
(Continued from Pafte i) 



I mil (.allies 



Saturday 

3 00. t.45 
8.30 



Buster Keaton In 

"<;<) WEST" 

7 reels. Buster's latest and 

funniest. News 

Ski Jumping In the Alps 

2 reels 



Mon. 

3.00 
6.45 8.30 



Warner Baxter, Esther Ral- 
ton and Kathlyn Williams 
in "THE BEST PEOPLE" 
The kind of comedy you like. 
From the play that rocked 
New York with laughter. 
Review Pathe Comedy I 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



We have just received another large 
assortment of OVERSHOES at different 
Avoid being too late. 
Hosiery a Specialty 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



prices. 



1927 
MorriU.M 
Griffin, rl 
Naah.c 
Merlini4l 
Swaii.lK.lt 
BriKKs.ru 



Totals 

1926 
lensen.li 

K.ilso,rf 
Gores, If 
Sawyer ,c 
Laajpriuwr.il 
Diclc.rg 

Totals 

Referee- 
Two Year 

Holland .If 
West.rf 
Ryan, i 
Yiale.lg 
M aSHa.ru 
Tefft.rf.rg 



B 

."i 


ii 




Two Year 

Ti-ttt.rK 

MsaaaJl 

Shdnutjg 

Buraevla.c 

Leunt ini.e 
WVst.rf 
Holland, If 



5 4 14 Totals 



B F V 



(I 1 I 



8 ti 

(I II 

1 1 

2 i a 

5 3 14 



B 
4 

4 

2 





r 

B 

10 

ii 
1 

ii 




1929 

Robertson, rg 
Tompkins, Ik 
Coukos.c 
Webber.rf 

Ktlley.lf 



io I 2:j 

-Davenport. 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

Thompson sells Corona and Reming- 
ton Typewriters and gives good service 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the beat in everything 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

A'f ew moments spent each day in the care of your teeth is well 
north while. The San Tox Tooth Brush is scientifically constructed 
and cleans outside, inside and around the corners San I ox lootn 
Paste used with San Tox tooth brush is guaranteed to give satisfaction 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



r 

i 




1 





Totals 6 2 14 

Referee — Tumey. 



1928 

Reed.rf 

McGuire.lf 

Blonuiuist.c 

Thomas.rg.c 

t'ooke.rg 

Mt Kwen. Ik 

kane.lg 



Totals 20 2 42 

Referee — Davenport . 



Totals 

1926 

Dick.rg 

Langstiaw.lg 

Thompson.c 

Kelso.rf 

Jensen.lf 

Totals 



1929 

Robertson.lg 

Tompkins.ig 

Coukos.c 

Cox.c 

llor.in.lt 

Kelley.lf 

^Vebber.rf 

Totals 



B F 1* 

2 4 

3 a 'j 

1 1 
2 2 6 

1 2 



8 6 22 



B F P 

1 1 

3 3 



1 1 3 
10 2 



2 5 9 



6 4 16 



BOSTON1ANS 

SOME NEW ONES JUST IN; 

come in and look 
them over .... 



BOLLES SHOE STORE 



MAIN STREET 



AMHERST 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



COMPACTS with "Massachusetts" on the lid of 
each, - - $1.00 and $1.50 

80c a volume, Everyman's Library. Start a collection of the 
World's Best Books. 

90c a volume. The South Seas edition of Robert Louis Stev- 
enson and The Biographical Edition of (). Henry. 




77ie Record Of A Great Grade Holstein 

This wonderful cow was bred and fed by Paul Moritz 
of West Bend, Wis. In our big herd at the recent National 
Dairy Show she won the championship for grade Holsteins 
and first prize for cow over four years. 

Molly's record for 322 days was 12,1304 pounds of milk 
and 5 7 1 .q pounds buttcrfat . The cost of her feed was only 
$03. 57 and after paying for the feed Mr. Montz had a 
profit of $172.01. 

After the show this cow was sold for $325.00, a record 
price for a grade cow. Her milk and butter record and also 
the price she brought show that she was well bred and 
wisely fed. 

This cow and the oo others in our herd were all fed on a 
ration balanced with Corn Gluten Feed. Their records 
prove that the largest profits in the milk business arc due 
to good breeding and Corn Gluten Feed. 

Feed Com Gluten Feed with your home grown rations— 
for dairy cows— for beef cattle— for hogs. Tell us what 
materials you are feeding and we will suggest a good ration 
for you. 

If you prefer to feed a ready mixed feed be sure to buy 
from a manufacturer who uses Com Gluten Feed as an 
ingredient. 

Write for Bulletin No. 3. It tells all the facts about The 
Champion Herd of Grade Cows and gives the record of each 
one of them. 

Associated Corn Product* Afanu/ocfurert 
Feed Research Department 

Hugh C. Van Mt, Director 

208 South La Salle St., Chicago, III. 

3EK 





G-E Motorized Power — 
an ideal combination of 
electric motor and con- 
trol properly fitted to the 
individual task — is at 
work the world-over, 
relieving workers more 
and more for better and 
more profitable pursuits. 

A new series of G-E ad- 
vertisements showing 
what electricity is doing 
in many fields will be 
sent on request. 
Ask for Booklet GEK-1. 




Where, motorized power is virtually unknown, men m^yetmamm- 
phsh little. The United State, ha* ov.r Ml SSiHSf •* »«»*» 
horsepower installed par c.p.ta^ /-« ■■. H 1* * 4 . 1 l.n tr *> .•*** 

Orient, has but 04 horsepower Elect r,c shovel and storage battery 
locomotive are shown at a completely electrified open-pit coal mine, 
at Colstiip, Montana. 



Work without Toil 



Ten or twelve hours a day toils the coolie. If he 
carries all he can, he moves one ton one mile in 
one day. For that he receives twenty cents. 

Cheap labor! Yet compared with our American 
worker, receiving at least twenty-five times as much 
for an eight-hour day, the coolie is expensive labor. 
In America we move one ton one mile for less than 
one cent. The coolie, working by hand, accomplishes 
little; while the American, with electricity s aid, 
accomplishes much. 

Plenty of electricity and cheap electricity -these 
are two great advantages which America enjoys 
over the rest of the world. While our present gener- 
ating capacity is 20,600,000 kilowatts, new develop- 
ments call for 3,000,000 kilowatts more per year. 

To college men and women— potential leaders-will 
fall the duty of finding more and still more wori 
for electricity, with less and still less toil for our 
workers. For the task is but begun! 




«-!«»" 



GENERAL- ELECTRIC; 



GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY 



SCHENECTADY, NEW 



You Can Start the New Year Right by hopping aboard these Real Values - 

OVERCOATS reduced to - $25 and $30 a^^'™5uy " 

The supply is limited and the demand large. Action is necessary 



large. n^i.ivj»i »«» «■•■«■■■■■■# ^ 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



gfrg iMagHarintggttfi (fioUrmatt 



- I Vol. XXXVI. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JAN. 13, 1926 



No. 12 



periodic Play Will 

Be in Modern Dress 

She Stoops to Conquer" to be Presented at This Year's Prom 
Show, With Twentieth Century Costumes. 



The Rootlet Doister Dramatic Society 

ku \ t -inured into a new field this year in 
electing its play for the Junior Prom 
tattoo. It will present M its part of the 
program Oliver C.oldsinith's "She Stoops 
ttqucr". The interesting novelty 
tt ill be that the entire cast will wear 
modem dress of the twentieth century 

imtead «>f the- pe rio dic costumes of the 
teenth century. 

lhi> play, a comedy of manners, is 

,,,„• ul the lew plays that lias never lost 
itl popularity. Its lively, bustling scenes, 

m ,i iti pleasantry absurd characters, 
Marlowe, the Hardcastles, and Tony 
Lumpkin, still hold the attention of 
modern theater goers. The play pitMUtI 
jg quick succession a seri s of hearty 

bumorotH scenes. These qualfc ics together 

with the innovation of modern dress 
ihould make the production very interest- 
mi |i well as amusing. 

Hi, Roister DotSten in choosing this 
pl,i\ is taking its cue from the production 
t Hamlet" in modern dress which is 
hdag played in New London and New 
nork this season. Iloth of these perform- 
ances were not only unique but also 
Irainatically effective and popular. This 
b the second experiment in this country 
ii showing a classic, periodic play in con- 
tenporary vesture. Trials for the cast 
«ill Ik- held in about a week. 



Greenaway and Blomauist 
to go to Northneld 



CkeeetJ Delegates to 
\ssiKiation Conference. 



Christian 



At the M.A.C. C.A. meeting held Jan. 
6, J. Emerson Gtweaeway '27 was chosen 

. iuirni.ui oi the Deputation* Connt, 

aa\ .ind <".. Stanley Blonit|uist '2.S 
ROMs to be the Christian Associa- 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Fraternities Pledge 

Thirteen More Men 



Twelve Freshmen and One Sophomore 
Pledged at Chapel Last Monday. 



The following men were pledged last 
Monday as a result of the second term 
rushing seasoi : 

\AlpmsGanmtj Rho— Stanley F. Bailey '29 

| Mpha Stgm Phi— John S. Woodbury '29 

Zappa Eptilem — Walter E. Southwick '29 

Chi Alpha — Lawrence A. Cornins 

i eroyO. Jones '29; Carl Settefc '29; 

Charles K. Verner '29; Stuart M. Ward 

I Phi Stgmt Kappa — Mario Capone '28 
I i Robert L. Bowie '29 

%Bs I'ln Epsilon — Chesley L Black '29 
yhtla Chi Frank I. Howe '29; Hunting- 
ton Routan '29 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Thursday— 
iaterfraterntty basketball. Alpha 
ia I'hi vs. Kappa Sigma and 
Alpha Gemma Rho vs. Non- 
Fraternity. 
Friday- 
varsity hockey. M.A.C. vs. Hamil- 

'"ii. there. 
Varsity basketball. M.A.C. vs. 
Brown, here. 
Saturday — 
Varsity hockey. M.A.C. vs. R.P.I. 

there. 
'nteriraternity basketball. Lambda 
( hi vs. Theta Chi and Kappa 
Gamma Phi vs. Kappa Epsilon. 
Sunday— 

"•10a.m. Sunday Chapel. Speaker, 
Rev. Samuel A. Lliot, American 
' nitarias Al ociation. Boston. 

m. Social I'nion Concert. 
Boston Chamber of Music Club, 
■uesday— 

entity basketball. Theta 
( hi vs. Phi Sigma Kappa and 
u . I) '!'i Phi Alpha vs. A. T. G, 
Wednesday— 
Varsity basketball. M.A.C. vs. 
^'-''■yan, here. 



DE JENS ENTERTAINS 
WITH MYSTIC TRICKS 



Superstitions and Fakes Exposed by 
Social Union Performers. 



How far have we progressed in this so 

called age of enlightenment? Gean De 

Jen, who, with his company, K'» VI ' ■» series 
of mystifying tricks and spiritualistic 
manifestations last Friday evening in 

Bowfcer Auditorium in one of the Social 

i'nion entertainments, believes thai \w- 

have not progressed as tar as many art- 
led to think. In illustrating his point he 
mentioned the wide faith in fortune- 
telling, spiritualism, and the i>ctt\ super 
st it ions which so many people have. 

The entertainment began with a rapid 
succession of mystifying tricks by Mr 
De Jen. Following this Lucile De Jen 
rendered two vocal selections, the accom- 
paniment of which she played on tin 
piano. Mr. I >c Jen then proceeded to 
show how several methods of slate writing 
are done. Lie was assisted by two stu 
dents in this exjK>sure of an apparent 
phenomena. Several readings by Mr. De 
Jen's assistant preceded the feature of the 
evening's entertainment. 

A remarkable exhibition of mental 
telepathy by Mr. De Jen and Lucile I )e 
Jen opened the concluding part of the 
program. Mr. De Jen -went down in the 
audience and took requests for any selec- 
tion from (irand Opera to the latest 
popular music. At his request Lucile 
De Jen, who was blindfolded at the piano, 
played the desired pine entirely from 
memory and without any apparent com- 
munication with Mr. De Jen. 

\ typical spiri' sj-.ipcc, including a 

mysterious trumpet, an ssssupported 

tambourine dancing in the air and plav 
ing as if by spirits, and a skeleton which 
disappeared part by part, was the con- 
cluding number. Some of the identical 
manifestations which wain over Sir Conan 
Doyk and Sir Oliver Lodge were shown. 
Mr. De Jen in his explanation said that 
optical illusion plays the major part in 
the successful presentation of many 
startling phenomena. 



Mrs. J. D. Kenney Dies 

as House is Burned 



Mother of Treasurer of the College 
Succumbs to Shock in $20,000 Blaze. 



The Mount Pleasant home of Fred C. 
Kenney was practically totally destroyer! 
by fire at a late hour Tuesday night, 
January 5. When almost under control 
the Ha. nes broke out anew and burned the 
entire roof and second story before they 
(Continued on Psafie 4) 



Fifty Enroll in 

Winter School 



More Expected in Dairying Courses. 
Total will Probably be as Large as 
Last Year. 



The Ten Weeks' Winter School, which 
opened Monday, January 4, has proven 
very popular this year according to 
Roland H. Yerbeck, Director of Short 
(curses. The total enrollment to date in 
all fFe courses offerer! is about X). When 
< iirollment for the four separate courses 
in Dairying is completed it is expected 
that the total enrollment will closely 
approach that of last year. 

Of all the various courses the scientific 
course for practical florists is the most 
popular this year. In spite of the fact 
that this course has not been given for 
two years it has already reached its 
maximum limit of enrollment. At present 
only one course in Dairying is being given 
and that is Testing Milk and Its Products, 
which is to be given January 5-16, The 
other three courses which are to be offered 
in Dairying are as follows: Milk Plant 
Operation, January 19-30; Milk Inspec- 
tion, February 2-iM; and Ice Cream 
Making, February 16-27. 



HOCKEY TEAM 

SHU1 OUT BY M. I T. 



Initial Game on Poor Ice Results in 
i to Loss for Aggie Pucksters. 



The M.A.C. sextet met defeat in its 
first game of the season at the hands of 
the M.l.T. skaters by a score of .'{ to on 
Saturday afternoon. The visiting team, 

which had been able to practice regularly 

on an indoor rink, displayed a more 
polished offense and greater skill in 
shooting. They tallied once in the first 
IH'tiod and twice in the second, but were 
unable to repeat in the final session. 

The ice was in poof condition on 
account ol the warm weathei which came 

early in the week followed l>\ the first 
heavy snowfall <»i the winter on Saturday, 

so long shots for the cage prevailed. 

Captain "Buddy" Molierg was the only 
member of the Aggies who could iliiblile 
consistently over the rough surface. 

The summary: 



M. |.T. 






M.A.C. 


Wiesncr.lw 






rw 


Aliiahamson 


Freeman, Iw 








rw.Stopfonl 


Randall.c 








rw.Hilyard 


Berkely ,rw 








c.Moberg 


Brooks, Id 








lw, Forest 


Hock. Id 








Iw.Swan 


Crandall.rd 








rd.L rest- 


Dgran.g 








Id, Potter 


Richards.g 








g,( i.ilanie 
g, Palmer 


Penalties- 


-Brook 


s, 


illegal 


checking, 1 


minute. Referee 


•Peacock. 


Goal um 


pins Reeil 


and 


M 


ulhern 


Time — In 


min. periods. 








• 



Dr. Lindsey 

is Honored 



M.A.C. Professor Awarded (.old Medal 
by Agricultural Organizations. 



At the Eighth Annual I'nion Agricul 
tural Meeting <>1 Massachusetts Agricul 
tural Organizations held in Worcester 

recently Dr. Arthur \V. Gilbert, Com- 
missioner of Agriculture of Massai husctt s, 
awarded five gold medals for notable 

achiev em e n t in the field <>t agriculture. 

The award followed the annual banquet 
on t!i<* evening of January <> in Hotel 
Bancroft. 

The first medal awarded was granted 
to Dr. Joseph B. Lindsey, Gosestnattfl 
Professor of Agricultural Chemistry and 
Head of the Department, for outstanding 
service in the field of science as applied 
to agriculture. Among the other medals 
to Ik- awarded there was one awarded to 
Oscar Belden it Sons of Hatfield, in which 
firm are Clifford Belden '21 and Sanlonl 
Belden ex-'27. , 

Printed letters giving a basis of award 
were distributed at the tables. I he 
letter concerning Dr. Lindsey will interest 
all M.A.C. men. Parts of it are as follows: 

"Dr. Joseph B. Lindsey has for more 
than thirty years been in the service ol 
the Massachusetts farmers through the 
Agricultural LLx(>eriment Station. He is 
a scientist who has applied the- resources 
of chemistry to the problems of the 
(Continued on Pafte 2) 



Quintet Makes Flying 

Start in Opening C-nes 



36 to 21 Victory for Agates Against 
Military Invaders in Slow but Hard 
Fought Came. Team Shows Cham- 
pionship Possibilities. 



The Mass. Aggie quitttel started their 
hlL't't season by defeating Norwich .'>ti to 

21 at the M.A.C. Drill Hall last Thursday 

in a rather slow but still hard louglit 
game. The cadets kept pace with the 
Aggie marksmen until the middle of the 
first period lint alter that the home l>o\s 

slipped away from them and piled up .1 

■even point lead Inline the- end ol the 
period and swelled it to fifteen l>oiiits 

luiore the final whistle. The iw<> i<" 

wauls did most of the scoring lor t he 

Agates but the rest of tin- team functioned 
with such cleverness that mother chain 

piouship team is not improbable. 

"I.arry" Jones stalled the scoring with 
a fbttl shut ,iiu\ Ainu followed with a two 

counter for Norwich. The score swayed 

first in one team's lavor and then t lu- 
mbers until Norwich had a I to S lead. 

Cantata Temple called lor time <>ut fat 

M.A.C. and then the Agates started to 
loop, piling up fifteen points to the cadets 
three before the- period ended. The sur 
prise- of the period came when Kelso, who 
was substituted for Smiley, gained (he 
jealously inspired name- of "Horseshoes' 1 
for dropping the ball neatly through the 
beep from nearly mid-floor. 

The second half was mostly M.A.C.'s. 
The Agates showed t hi-mselves superior 
to the- visitors in every department but 
the soldiers still had much light and were 
not beaten in spirit even al the end. 

Nine- men played for the- Maroon and 
White- but the- forwards and Jones were- 
retained. Kelso showed his worth as a 
sharp shooter as well as a hard worker in 
the back court. Murelough and Griffin, 
both juniors we-re given ■ chance to 
show their worth and proved t hat they 
may still give "Blonely" I hennas a haul 
fight for position. Kane- was also tried 
out. 

Bedell in the bach court was high scorer 

for Norwich and played a high (lass game- 
as did Piumley, the- other guard and 
Molter who jumped center. 
The summary: 

M.A.C. B.F.P. Norwich 
Temple, If 4 AW Plumle-y.rg 

P't'h'mer.rf li I Li Bedell, Ig 

li 2 Molter,. 

•'{ K ti llarpiii.c 
Murelough, Ig (I (I Aimi.rf 
Thomas, rg (I II I lourin.lf 

2 4 



Jones, 1 

Smiley, Ig 



B.F.P. 

1 a . r > 

2 3 7 
2 11 1 

ti 

1 a . r > 
ti it 



Kc Iso.rg 
Griffin ,rg 

Kane-.rg 



(I 
I) 



Poultry Judgers 

Go To New York 



Ames and White are High Scorers 
but Team Average Low in Inter- 
collegiate Contest. 



Massachusetts Agricultural College was 
represented at the ninth annual Inter 
i ollegjate Poultry Judging Contest, which 
was held at Madison Square Garden, 
New York City, on Friday, January 8, by 
a team composed of the following men: 
R. C. Ames '27 of Tilton, N. LL; L. A. 
Krassovsky '27 of Amherst; \\ . II. 
Parkin '27 of Chicopec; and M. White- '2»i 
of West Hartford, Conn. They were ac- 
companied by Professor Luther Banta, 
who has coached the college judging 
teams for the past seven years. 

The MAC. team met stiff opposition 
and finished last in the contest, in which 
si\ other colleges participated. Of t he- 
Massachusetts team, Ames made high 
score on the written examination, on 
standard judging, and also had the highest 
total score. He- was followed closely by- 
White, with whom he was tied for high 
utility man on the Aggie team. 



Totals Iff 680 Totals 821 

Score- at the- end of the half — M.A.( . 
P.l. Norwich II. Referee— Whalen. 

Time — 20-min. halves. 



S. F. R. L. Conference 

Here Next Month 

Notable Speakers will Address 
Gathering of Student Liberals. 



— CO 

Well Drilled W.P.I. Bas > 1 rs Beaten 
27 to 14 on Their Own r 'W -. Agates 
Ceime From Behind an £5: z | e Tech- 
men Before an Enthu jj § c Crowd. 

The M.A.C. bashetba n defeated 

the Worcester lech live at Won ester last 

Saturday night 27 t«» 1 1 in 1 last, bard 
fought but abs o l u tely deal battle. The 

lech men scored tiist in the opening 

minute when Kimball dropped in 1 two 
counter. The Worcester desenea was 
baffling rat the Aggie offense dining the 
lust period but Sniiiex causa through 

with lour long shots over then heads to 
beep the Aggies on a par with the- lighting 
cnginci is I In- Abates displayed excellent 
condition during the entire- game- and 
although neither team had a substitution 
the- Agates wen- winking even Letter at 
the end of I he- game than at the- stall. 

"Larry" Jones helped the Aggie cause 
maiei iaiiv by mvariabry getting the tap. 

Alter the first score the play livened up 
but the- M.A.C. men were- effect ivcly held 
oil from under the baskei so Smiley pro- 
ceeded to toss one over their heads 
evening the count. Worcester took I he- 
ball and alter a series of clever passe-s 
Neiiliauir scored from under the basket. 
Harris made the- tally 8 tO li when he shot 
a foal. Smiley however e amc- back with 
another long shot and Partinheimer 
followed with a shot from the corner 
bringing the- Agates Lack into the lead. 
Kimball shot a loul making the count fl- 
ail but Smiley came back with another 
shot from the same- s|x>t from which he 
had sunk his two previous counters I he 
Worcester rooteis wire- even more en- 
thusiastic now than al the start for they 
were- keyed up to win. Ihe Worceste-r 
men absorbed even more- ol "ginigcr" and 
staged a conn-hack which iletted live mole 
points bringing the count to ll-S lor the 
boast team. But again Smile-y trieel a 
long shot and proved that his eye was 

functioning perfectly, Fo llow ing this 

Jones sunk the last counter of the- BCtsssI 
throwing the visitors into a 12 to II lead 
al half time. 

The- Agates entered tin- second stage- of 

tile- game- with a drive that swe-pl aside all 
opposition and piled up a score- nearly 
double thai of their op|x»nents. Temple 
scored hist followed closely by the- rangy 
guard. Thomas. More long shots were 
tried without success and then Worcester 
tried the- same- one- ol whiih was success- 
ful, I Let lis being the mat ksman. Ihe only 
other WorOSStat score- came as the- result 
ol a loul .n)>\ the Techmen had |>osscssion 
of the- hall but little. In the- last eight 
minutes the- Agates piled upeleveti |ioiiils, 
long shots still l>eing the- order. 

The summary: 



The Student Federation of Religious 

Liberals will hold its second Connect ii ul 
Valley Conference at Amherst on Satur- 
rlay and Sunday, Feb. 18 and 14. The 
topic for c onsidera tion is to lx- "The 

Race Problem in the United States,'' and 
the Federation is very fortunate in having 

already secured for two e»f its three princi- 
pal speakers men who are well-known 
authorities on certain aspects of the rare 
problem in this country. 

An address on "Ihe Nordic Myth" by 
Prof. Frank II. Hankins of Smith College 
will open the- conference, and it will be 
(Continued on Page 2) 



M.A.C. 

I emple.lf 
P't'h'mer.rf 
Jones, c 
Smiley, Ig 
Thomas, rg 

Totals ii .-,27 Totals •") II « 

Son- at the end of the- half— M.A.C. 

12; W.P.I. II. Referee Kelly. Time— 

20-min. halves. 



B.F.P. W.IM. 
2 2 6 llarris.rg 

2 I o Wilkinson, Ig 

I 2 Kimball.e 

1 H (.allup.rf 

2 2 Ii Ne-ubaue-r.lf 



I!. I P. 
I 2 I 

I) 
2 I 8 

1 I | 
1 (I 2 



INTERCLASS HOCKEY 

All games to 1m- played al 7 p. m. 
Managers: 1926, Williams; 1*127, Ander- 
son; 1928 and 1929, the Department. 

Jan. 12—1928 vs. 1928 
18- 1227 vs. 2 yr. 

hi p»2»; rs, 1929 

21- P.I27 vs. HI2H 

28 1929 vs. 2 yr. 
2H 1928 vs. HI27 

.'! 1928 vs. 2 yr. 

4 — 1 !»27 vs. IU21) 

5—1921', vs. 2 yr. 

11— 192s vs. 1928 (Nutneral) 



Two Years Lose 

to Hopkins Academy 

Close Came Coes to Hadley Team, 
14—12. 



The- Two Ye-ar ejuintet was toned to 
accept the loser's end of a I 1 to 12 score 
in their first game of the season against 
Hopkins Academy on Saturday. The 
defensive work of l>oth teams was the 
outstanding feature of the game. 



Feb 



INTKRFRATKRNITY BASKKTBALL 

The inte-rfraternity basketball season 
was started last Tuesday night in the 
Drill Hall when Kappa Sigma won a 
closely contested gatm- from Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 

The following are- the scores for the 
week: 

Kappa Sigma i.">, Phi Sigma Kappa 13 

Alpha Camma Rho 21, Sigma Phi 

Epsilon 10. 

Lambda (hi Alpha 18, Q.T.V. 7. 
Kappa Epsilon 11, Delta Phi Alpha 8. 






I 






ACHUS ETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. JAN. 13, 1926 

.^ ■ — — - 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published cwiy 
Wednesday by the students. 

HOARD OF EDITORS 



Why N«. 



Mary T. Hoyd '26 
Jqhn f. Lamubrt '26 



Editor-in-( tiii t 
Maiiaitiiiis Kditor 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 



Editorial 
Cider Press 
Athletics 



Campus News 



Co-Ed News 
Alumni 
Faculty News 



Mary T. Bow "-'•'' 

Maky t. Bom '26 

William L. Dole '27 

IIakoi.i) L Clark '2K 

l. Rot kwii.i Burnt, J« - s 

Ruissi l- si'i'nckr 2s 

H ISWOR1H BARNARK '2H 

Kkwawi) 11. Ni< i«" ls 
William R. 1'imnmy 
Francks C. Hrice '27 

Josl I'lUNK I'ANZICA '2H 

\V. Cordon Hi mi R "-■> 



-".I 



passible, 
offered. 

is that 

use the 

' ill the 

college 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Alvin G. Stevkns '26 Butinett Manager 

Edw.n A. Wilder'28 Advertising Manager 

Larvis H. Whitakbr '27 Cir. ulauon Manager 

John E. White '27 

Douglas W. Loking '28 

Charles I". C lacg '27 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Sing It- 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



peered as aecond-class matter at the Amherst 
POU Office!* Ac^pted (or mailing at «pec»l •>£ 
of postage provided for in section 1MB. Act of IX 
tober" 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



The College and the Critics 

The target of general criticism is con- 
stantly changing. A few years ago 
pulpits thundered, headlines shrieked, 
ami moralists hurled denunciation at the 
llapper, with her short hair and her 
ukelele and her petting partus. Now 
everyone has short hair, the ukelele is a 
forgotten commonplace, and the llapper 
is happily married ami raising a family. 
The flapper is no longer a possible target ; 
therefore, "A new one!" cry the critics. 
and train their batteries upon the college 
student. 

A few misleading novels drew the first 
fire. That there are a few students of the 
depicted types cannot be deriied, but 
they are so far in the minority as to be 
practically negligible. They are the icing 
on the college cake, if the mixed figure be 
allowed. They are showy and attention 
compelling and highly flavored but only 
icing after all. Beneath, stern critics, is 
the cake; and the collegiate cake is com- J 
posed of the true students of the college. 
The men who work their way through 
college because they earnestly desire 
college training do not regard the class- 
room as a boring interruption to their 
extra-curriculum activities. The men who 
consider their Alma Mater . neither as 
stadiums or ballrooms with colleges 
attached are not wasting their precious] 
opportunities. Phi Beta Kappa still 
flourishes. And, for every group of 
"Bull-festers", there is another group of 
serious students who are striving to make 
the best use of their time in and for their 
college. Do the critics consider this? 

Fairness demands that the student con- 
ference be as featured as the "prom", but 
it is not because it offers not the slightest 
target for criticism. Young men gather 
together from many colleges, and strive 
to come to some solution of the problems 
vitally affecting the educational world. 
They discuss these problems with open- 
minded educators and scholars. They 
cut impatiently through the accepted 
academic hypocracies to the fundamen- 
tal necessities. It is the students who 
recommend the relegation of athletics to 
their proper place in the scholastic 
scheme of things— the criticized students, 
understand, not the college authorities 
who officially condemn, while they just 
as officially countenance the overemphasis. 
It is the students who gathered, nine 
hundred strong, at the Evanston Student 
Conference, and in vigorous discussion 
formulated proposals for the clarification 
of the existing world-wide confusion. It 
is the students themselves who recom- 
mended that militarism and denomina- 
tionalism— traditionally the hobbyhorses 
of fir. > Youth— be abolished, that scholar- 
ship be placed ftbovt atMetk accomplish- 
ment, and that "What do you know . J " 
replace "What have you done:''" as the 
campus shibboleth. 

The critics will find another target 

eventually. Their attention will be 

focused on something new. leaving the 
student a little freer to work his way 
toward his ultimate goal, the pursuit of 

knowledge, unhampered l>\ the academic 

incidentals which, swollen like fungi after 
,, ,.,m. 0ff« the present target for essen 
tially unjustifiable criticism. 



This is, it such a % 
a frivolous suggest! 
It is effered becauai 
something must I*' d- 
college is traditional!} 
matter « >t experiment. N 
boasting on it* grounds an bsperimenl 

Station should consisuntly support the 
doctrine of ex|K-rimc ntation under all 

circumstance*. 

The suggestion is that ollic ial sanction 
lor Assembly periods of the good old 
English CUttom of heckling be given. The 
only way of insuring that eager attention 
so faltering to B speaker is to let the 
listeners join in in the- speaking. Which 

is not as contradictory as it sounds, as 
•ritness heckling. In order to heckle, 

listeners must pay the- strictest attention, 
in order to know when and how interrup- 
tion! may lx- most effectively made . 

In SUCh .i case, Asseinblies would e hangc 
from endured interludes to eagerly con- 
tested battles of wits. Speakers would be 
annoyed at first, but none the less stimu- 
lated by questions, thrusting rapier-like 

through the- weak places in their forensic 
armour. Students would Ik- alert to dis- 
cover those weak place-s, if not for actual 
interest in the speech, for the natural 
enjoyment of throwing a monkey wrench 
into the machinery. 

Heckling, then, would stimulate- intclli 
gent Interest in questions of the clay, for 
the successful heckler must Ik- well posted 
in order to know the weak spots when he 
hears them. Inaccuracies that now pass 
Over our drowsy heads would be joyfully 
challenged. Empty platitudes would be 
punctured by pointed inquiry. Assembly 
would be immensely improved. The much 
vaunted inspiration of the- audience of 
bright youthful faces must lose much of 
its force when the bright youthful faces 
an- either frankly yawning or se-mi 
somnolent. The lecturer's inspiration in 
these cases must be much less than his 
well defined wish to throw a lighted keg 
of dynamite. 

Heckling would save all that. Anyone- 
like the idea? 




AT THE ABBEY 



S. F. R. L. CONFERENCE HERE 

(Continued from Page 1) 
immediately followed by a round-table 
discussion on "Race Superiority", led by 
a student from MAC. Saturday evening 
Prof. H. Phillips Bradley of Amherst 
College will speak on "The Political and 
Industrial Aspects of the Race Problem." 
Prof. Bradley is very much interested in 
labor classes and has been devoting a 
great deal of his time to the study of the 
effects of race on such groups, while Prof. 
Hankins is at present working on a book 
in which he is considering the question of 
Nordic supremacy in its many aspects. 
There will be dancing following the talk 
Saturday evening. 

Sunday morning, Mary Merwin '26 of 
Mt. Holyoke will lead a round table on 
"Race Adjustment", which will be im- 
mediately followed by a morning devotion- 
al service. The concluding address of the 
conference will be on "Tolerance" and 
will be given Sunday afternoon, either by 
President Lewis of M.A.C. or Professor 
Newlin of Amherst. 

Unity Church will be the scene of the 
conference, and the members of its parish 
will accommodate delegates in their homes 
over night. As accomodations are dis- 
tinctly limited, it would be well for those 
who wish to attend to send their registra- 
tions as soon as possible to the North- 
ampton office, 43 West Street, in order 
that they may be sure of lodging for 
Saturday night. 



A Sweet Story 

If you dislike puns, go no farther. 
However, it really happened, In a campus 
classroom, as follows: 

Prof. Yes, we- sent a few che-mists to 
Cuba the- other clay to investigate the 

manufacture of sugar. 

Stiidtut No, I— It must have been a 
sweet job. 

Stiulnil Xo. 2 - I bet they raised cane. 

CP 

By the Way— 

We learn, from a semi-official source-. 
th.it M.A.C. lias practically none of the 
liquor problems that trouble so many 
colleges. This would seem to prove con- 
elusivelv that we are not a hie! eollege. 

CP 

♦♦Is Zat So?" 
A newspaper syntlicate is running a 
series of The last Words of Famous 
Men." A girl-friend of ours tells us that 
the most famous last words she knows of 
; ,r,-, "Well, good-bye. I'll call you up 
again some time soon." 

CP 

Radiophoney 

A lady sang o'er radio; 

Her voice — not even fair. 

The fans all wrote in 

"Take her off. 

What we want is— Fresh Air." 

CP 

Glee-fully Speaking- 
It happened in a Spanish class. The 
lesson was concerned with the adventures 
of a donkey, a goat, a cat, and a rooster 
who decided that their singing voices 
warranted • trip to Bremen. "Where," 
said they, as read by the professor and 
somewhat doubtfully translated by the 
class, "We will sing in the Opera." 

Then, a wicked whisper from the rear 
of the room: "Why not the glee club?" 

CP 

The Traveller's Lament 
(From the narrative of the man who drove 
from Boston to Amherst via the Mohawk 

Trail.) 
The beauties of the countryside 

We rode out to admire; 
We saw long rows of flaming signs 

Advising "Buy Our Tire" 
Or "Smoke Fat-herrings" or the like. 

The bounty of the land? 
We saw it— neatly marked "For Sale" 

In every roadside stand! 
CP 



"How much am 1 bid?" "<"'oing, going, 
gone!" High and hilarious waxed the 

bidding at th. auction held at the Abbey 
last Saturday noon. This auction is a 
"termly" affair, when one gets rid of 
se-veral white elephants and ac i umulates 
as many more. 

M 

Janice Cooper, Two Year J.">, was 
visiting on campus this weekend. 

GREENAWAY AND BLOMQUIST 

(Continued from Page 1) 

tion's representatives at the Northtield 

Conference to be held February l- 14. 

Only two delegates are- allowed from each 
college regardless of tin- si/.e of the insti- 
tution. 

Elmer E. Barber '-'<) was chosen chair- 
man of a committee to select twenty men 
to he guides at the Student Volunteer 
Convention of Connecticut \ alley Col- 
leges. This convention is to be held at 
M.A.C. March 6-7. It is expected that 
there will be 190 men and women from 
fourteen or fifteen colleges. 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

RADIO SALES 

and SERVICE 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK. 



TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda Chi Alpha House. Tel. .5258 

S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up one flight 

OculUta Prescrlptlona Filled. Broken leniet 
accurately replaced 
BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 
reliable makes 



'24 Klwin Kowell is a State Market 
reporter. 



NORTHAMPTON 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUNSINGWEAR and MEDALIA 

SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $U9 $1.75 

G. Edward Fisher 



WEEK OF JAN. 11 
Paul Hansell Presents 

The HorthamptOD Repertory Company 

— IN— 

"Diana of DobsonV 

By CICELY HAZILTON 

Evenings at 8.15 Sat. Mat. at 2.15 

Prices: 50c. to SI. 10. (including tax) 

Phone 435 



Ask for 



NEW 
HANDY PACK 

WRIGLEYS 



NextWeek-'Tttoe Live Ghotts 

By Max Marcinand Frederich Isham 



»> 



CHEWING SWECT 



DR. LINDSEY IS HONORED 

(Continued from Page 1) 

animal hushandry farm; a pioneer in the 
field of research study in animal nutrition; 
and an expert in chemical regulative work 
in feeds and fertilizers. 

"Dr. Lindsey is Massachusetts born and 
bred. He graduated from the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College forty-two years 
ago, and is now one of the College's out- 
standing alumni. His doctor's degree was 
obtained through study in C.ermany. 

it was in 1898 that Dr. Lindsay en- 
tered the service of the Massachusetts 

Agricultural Ex per im ent Station, in the 

Department of Chemistry. lie was 
associated with the late Dr. ( '.oessniann, 
in drafting, poshing through the legis- 
lature, and finally enforcing what was the 
first fertilizer control law in the United 
States. Later on Dr. l.indsey drafted the 
first feed control law in Mas 
one which was the second in t 
Stati s. 1'ntil quite recently, D 
had charge of the enforcement 
these laws. His life work, ho\ 
been in the study of animal nut 
Continued on Pafte .t) 



Study with Music ! 

Something should be done about 
popular music on the campus. An oppor- 
tunity for inserting a large quantity of 
knowledge into the minds of the student 
body is being woefully wasted. Most 
brains, as far as music is concerned, are 
one way anyway— these catchy tunes 
slide in easily but try and get them out! 
For instance, the ubiquitous "It Ain't 
(ionna Rain No More", and the newer 
but just as insidious "Show Me The Way 
To Go Home". Well, just suppose that 
Botany, for example, was chopped up 
into convenient lengths and fitted to those 
tunes. An exam would sing itself into a 
100 for anybody then. You couldn't 
forget your lessons if you tried. "Col- 
legiate" too, with its short choppy 
rhythms, would lend itself equally well 
to math formulas or Home Ec. recipes, 
|and insure perfect results every time. 
Cive us, kind teachers, a musical text- 
book, and the Dean can take his famous 
board home and use if for fire- wood! 
CP 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

I NCORPOR A TED 

275 High St. Holyoke 

S H oe S 

— AND— 

HOS1E RV 

of Quality and Fashion for 
M. A. C. Students 

Harry B. Herman, 1920 



We have just received another large 
assortment of OVERSHOES at different 
prices. Avoid being too late. 

Hosiery a Specialty 

JOHN POTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 




DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

Deuel's Antiseptic Throat Pastils 
For Huskiness and Throat Affections 
Harmless Agreeable Effective 

Can be used at any time Convenient Pocket Package 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Lots of Fun 

There was in Florida a real estate 
dealer who had a subdivision to sell. 
Being a real estate dealer, he knew that 
the name was the first move in a winning 
game, so he cast about for the name that 
would give the subdivision character and 
selling power and dignity. Said he, 
"This will be the gateway to sunny 
Florida. Ah! I have it— I'll get a Spanish 
name signifying gateway!", and so in 
large letters on many large signs he posted 
the name— "Los (iatos." 

Ask any Spanish student what's wrong 
with that sentence! 

CP 

From a Car Window 

Motto one — Piously painted on a large 

' .ulder next to an old barn: "Ye shall bc- 

ashed of your sins as white as snow." 

Motto two— Painted, not so piously, on 

e verv dirty wall of the barn: "Use 



ALL SET FOR THE NEW YEAR! 

CLEARANCE PRICES ON ALL SUITS 
AND OVERCOATS 

Buy your overcoat now and save just twenty 
per cent, on the regular price. Our assort- 
ment is good and it will be to your advant- 
age to look them over. 



.polio. It Pays. 



-CP- 



And that's that! 



F. M. Thompson & Son 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. JAN. II, 1026 




HlCKEY-FREEMAN Customized Clothes 

look better on men than they do on display. They are for the man who always 

wants to look, feel and be well dressed. 



The Mesi in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in l>rug Store Service 
HKNKY ADAMS & COMPANY 

TO* ^ t&nafb i J farm 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 

S AT 

DRURY'S 

College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



DR. LINDSEY IS HONORED 

(Continued from Page J) 

the properties ot commercial feeding 
stuffs 

"In pursuing t lii> work, the Doctor 
developed a unique experimental plant, 

one which has been duplicated ill not 
more than four other places in the country. 
Every standard |ixtbook on animal seed- 
ing cites results M secured by Dr. Lindet) 

and his to workers at the Massachusetts 

Station; and nearly eVOT mixed teed sold 

in this country utilizes, to a certain degree, 
the results of these studies." 



The Winter School student body has 
elected the following class officers: Presi- 
dent, Alvin Sloans; Vice-President, Law 
rence Atkins; Secretary, Ruth Anderson; 
Treasurer, Leonard Crosby. President- 
elect Sloane will also KTVC as delegate to 
the Two Year Student Council. On 
Friday evening at Memorial Hall, the 

Two YeW Students will give their annual 
reception to the students ol the- Winter 

School. 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST & DEACON. Props. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 



You will tin. I .111 .«. .II.iivi 

. . . siioi. REPAIRING SHOT . . . 

equipped with tin- mewl up- to -dule <.<ii»l>c.ir 
MacMSMT] .mil a modern 

■ HOI shining I'AKl.OK 
at II) Amity -Si , - Luhrovlt/ liloik 

II < un.ii i \liin.l SOW tf linn inrllh <IH./ ,lli frt- 
pilltit In »l,.l I.. ill H.i-./, 

All Work ..ii.iiiih Skon shine,! and Jytd. 

\l\< I VI ORANDONICO, I'n.p. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Kepnii inn While 1 1 Walt 



NEW l'Klc is 
Man's Whole Soles, UuliU-i Heel. 
Men's Hall s«,|,-s. Rubbei Heels 
Men's Riililxi SoW-H, Rubbei I 
Men's 1 1. ill Soles 



• Si.ftS 

1.75 

• J .15 
i • l..<» 

VVoik (iii.ii.ini.i-.i AMHK1S1 IKM si- 
Open till K I'. M. 




■ n 




ywbw, 1 



A Few Cents Puts this 

Chemist on Your Payroll 

MIXING a livestock or poultry ration is largely 
a matter of chemistry. 

If every feeder had this expert chemist and his 
equipment to test ingredients for protein, min- 
erals and carbohydrates then he would be sure 
his home mixed ration was properly balanced. 

Chemists and chemical laboratories are too 
expensive to have one in every barn. But any 
feeder can purchase the service of a whole 
corps of expert chemists by buying Purina 
Chows in Checkerboard Bags. 

For a few extra cents any feeder can put the 
Purina chemists on his payroll and thus insure 
a ration that is always scientifically balanced 
and always of the same high quality ingredients. 

Purina Chows in Checkerboard Bags are the 
very mixtures any feeder would make for 
himself if he had the equipment 

PURINA MILLS 



St. Loui 



Section of Purina Biological Labora- 
tories where the effect of feeding 
various feeding stuffs is studied 









Buffalo 
Fort Worth 

Kansas City 
Nashville 
East St. Loois 
Minneapolis 



FREE 

CRANK CASE 

SERVICE for 

FOUNTAIN PENS 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

(srt'I'LY I.I Mil ED) 

The New College Store 



M BUILDINC; 



SPECIAL THINGS 

for 
Special Students 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mass 

Our i.aundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHIM. DONK AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Oppoelte Poet Office 



ACROSS CAMPUS ON A COLD DAY 

Let vourself be kept warm by one of our sheepskins, or overcoats. When you come down town drop in and look at them, also ask about 
9 f our new N e ttleton shoes. 



Amherst 



CARL H. BOLTER 



Hyannis 



*--> V 



/>» 






THE MA 



SETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 13, 1926 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thurt. 

>.N. 

7.30 I Show 



Koi bring* hla greatem 
\iihtIi an epic to the ureen 

"THE IRON HOME" 
12 reel*. The slory of the 
irsi transcontinental rail- 
road linking the Fast with 
he Went. Names which have 
ome down In history appear 
,n the cast Lincoln, (.rant, 
Dodge, Huffalo BUI Ciotly, 
Wild Hill lllckok, etc. The 
i-ast Includes <ieo. O'Brien, 
vladge Bellamy and others 
Sews Fables Paine Comedy 

Matinees Evenings 

Children 25c Floor 40c 

\dult» 40c Balcony 50c 



Friday 

3.00 

6.45, 8.30 

2 Shows 



Richard Dli in 
•WOMANHANDIED" 
\n answer to C;iorla Swan- 
•ion's "Manhandled." A 
comedy drama by the same 
i ut nor. „ 

Sportlight Pathe Comedy 



NO! 

AH 



I BOOKS PAPER STATIONERY 

THJ NECESSARY EQUIPMENT TO START THE NEW TERM 

= YE AGGIE INN - ^ 



Saturday 

3.00 

0.45 B.3S 

2 Shows 



L 



Mon. 

3.00 

6.45 K.JO 

2 Shows 



Tom Mix and Tony In 

riders or thi rutins 

BAGB" 

ZaneCJrey's wonderful story 

,.f the West. 

View* Educational Comedy 



Ma Negri In " WOMEN 
OF THE WORM)." A mod- 
ern drama written In a hu- 
morous vein. Something 
now for Potal 
'atheReview PatheComedy 



COLLEGE SHOES 



AT 



TOWN PRICES 

PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



A letter has been received at the Micro- 
bioloffy Department from Dr. Itano. He 
has returned to Japan and is living in a 
new, electrically equipped house. 

Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the best in everything 

Have you seen that 

FOOLISH WINDOW? 
WHERE? 

at 

MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



JAMES A. LOWELL, BOOKSELLER 
TANUARY CLEARANCE SALE 1-2 PRICE 

BOOKS! 



BOOKS! 



BOOKS 



BEAUTY OF THE PURPLE" 
•l.OVE" 
•TIIUNIiERINC.; HERD'' _„_,„ 

THE CEORCE «c THE CROWN" 
'ENCHANTED HILL" 

•OEEpTnTIhI'hEARTS OF MEN- 
MOTHER'S RECOMPENSE" 
• LOITER Y" 

' LIONS' 'NTU.ERS N EVERYTHING" 



By Wm. Stearn Davis 

By "Elizabeth" 

By Zane Grey 

By Sheila Kaye-Smlth 

By Peter B. Kyne 

By Sinclair Lewis 

By Mary E. Waller 

By Edith Wharton 

By Woodward 

By Floyd Dell 

By Courtney Cooper 



MRS. J. D. KENNEY DIES 
(Continued from Page I) 

could be checked. The fire is thought to 

have started {rom hot ashes under the 

back piazza and was one of the most 

disastrous in this town (or many years. 

The loss will undoubtedly be about 

$2(),(XXJ. 

Mr. Kenney was away at the time but 
Charles E. Turner, a senior living with the 
family, aided Mrs. Kenney and her aged 
mother in leaving the house. The shock 
was too much for the aged Mrs. Joel 
Davis Kenney and she died a few hours 
later in the home of a neighbor. 

Mrs. Kenney, 77, was born in Bir- 
mingham, near Pontine, Michigan, Feb. 
28, 1848. The funeral washed Thursday 
afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home of 
Professor Charles II. Thompson, a neigh- 
bor on Mount Pleasant. Rev. F. A. 
I.eitcli of the Wesley Methodist church 
officiated and burial was in Wildwood 

cemetery. 

The con tr act for rebuilding the house 
has been let to Ceorge E. Hosworth and 
the work of clearing away the debris has 
already begun. The floors of the first 
story and some parts of the house can be 
salvaged although what was not burned 
was badly damaged by water. 



TheSlickest Coat on theCampus ! 

No well dressed college man U 
without one. It's the original, 
correct slicker and there's noth- 
ing as smart or sensible for 
rough weather and chilly days. 

Made of famous yellow water- 
proof oiled fabric. Has all* 
'round strap on collar and flat* 
tic at wrist-bands. 

Clasp-closing style 

Button-closing style 

Stamp the correct name in your 
memory, and buy no other. 
The "Standard Student" is 
made only by the Standard 
Oiled Clothing Co., N. Y. C 

Slip one on 

ALL GOOD DEALERS 




Compacts with "Massachusetts" on the lid of each, $1 & *l-5<> 



Come in and look over 
our Sale of 

SHOES 

GOOD VALUES 



B0LLES SHOE SI ORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



When the runners are 
bunched on the track — and 
suddenly Chuck, your own 
superman half-miler, spurts 
ahead on the finish and wins 
— have a Camel! 







IN EVERY RESPECT 
EVERYBODY'S NEWSPAPER, but 

Because of its thorough 
treatment of amateur sports 
and excellence of its school 
and college news, the 

is pre-eminently the 
newspaper for the student 

CLEAN COMPLETE DEPENDABLE 




WHEN the lithe half- 
mtlers are fighting for the 
lead. And your own 
dauntless champion sud- 
denly soars ahead and 
wins — have a Camel! 

For you'll never find 
another friend so attuned 
to your triumphs as 
Camel. Camels are made 
of the choicest tobaccos 
grown — they never dis- 
appoint your taste. 
Camels annihilated ciga- 
retty after-taste. Regard- 
less of price, you'll never 
buy better tobaccos, or 
blending, or flavor than 
you get in Camels. 

So this year when the 
old school's men go 
through for victory after 
victory — taste then the 
smoke that's choice of the 
world's victorious. 

Have a Camel! 





Into the making of this one cigarette goes all of the ability 
of the world's largest organization of expert tobacco men. 
Nothing is too good for Camels. The choicest Turkish and 
domestic tobaccos. The most skilful blending. The most 
scientific package. No other cigarette made is like Camels. 
No better cigarette can be made. Camels are the over- 
whelming choice of experienced smokers. 



f 1026 




Our highest with, if you 
Jo not yet know Camel 
quality, ii that you try 
them. We invite you /<> 
compare Can\e\t with 
any cigarette made at 

any price. 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco 

Company 



VALUE FIRST- 
is always assured here and in addition v 
reductions-an opportunity that you can 



ffering the remainder of our Winter Suits and Overcoats at substantial 

rd to miss. I I * J*m •* 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAUU 




Ula00arlM0?tta (EolUgtatt 



Vol. XXXVI. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JAN. 20, 1926 



No. 13 



Tuition Fee to be 

Charged Next Fall 



Trustees Place Charge of Twenty Dollars a Term on 

Students at M. A. C. 



all 



Massachusetts Agricultural College is 
to lot* its most distinctive characteristic, 
—that one feature which has been the 
nested attraction for many prospective 
indents— for, beginning next September, 
, uiition fee is to be charged. The 
BUteea of the college have decided to 
ettabtisfc a fee of twenty dollars a term 
(or residents of the state, the amount 
being proportional in all courses 

The principal reasons given for estab- 
lishing I tuition charge are as follows: 
fat, GOV. Fuller has recently urged the 
various departments of the common- 
getltfa to increase their revenue if possible, 
a „,l the trustees felt that a moderate 
tuition charge such as they have voted 
would be justified, and would impose no 
undue hardship on the majority of stu- 
dents. In the second place, several state 
colleges in New England and other sec- 
,; (l „s of the country already charge a 
tuition fee for students enrolled in agri- 
culture, and it appears that this practice 
is likely to be adopted in other states. 
Finally, last year there was considerable 
talk in the legislature of establishing a 
tuition fee here. This agitation has con- 
tinued to persist, and the fee proposed 
has ban placed at $1(X) to $150 per year. 
I Ik action of the trustees has brought 
forth widespread and universally un- 
(avorabk comment from the students. 
Several have even indicated they would 
be unable to return next year because of 
the added expense. 



Prof. Baker to 

Speak Here 



Noted Dramatist to be Guest 
Roister Doisters Friday Night. 



of 



BLOMQUIST AGAIN 
HEADS SOPHOMORES 



Robinson Elected Freshman Class 
President for Winter Term. 



G, Stanley Blomquist of Quincy was 

elected last week to serve his fifth suc- 

onarre term as president of the class of 

Harold E. Clark of Montague was 

rted treasurer. The other ofcm 

follows: vice-president, Alexander 

C Hudson of Reading; secretary, Rachel 

I. I'urrington of Shattuckville; captain, 

Mario ( apone of Chelsea; and sergeant- 

at am,-. Albert C. Cook of Belmont. 

Hit freshman class elected William B. 
Robinson of Port Chester, New York, as 
president, and Kenneth F. McKittrick 
of Boston as vice-president. Other 

oficen elected were: secretary, llelene 
M. I ufts of Jamaica Plain; treasurer, 
lark A. Tompkins of Easthampton; 
captain, Clifton R. Johnson of Worces- 
ter; and sergeant-at-arms, Charles E. 
Walkden of Swansea. 



Clark at YVor- 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Wednesday— 
Varsity hockey. Dartmouth at 

Hanover. 
Thursday— 
Intcrclass hockey. 1927 vs. 1928. 
I In Club concert at Hadley. 
Friday — 
Varsity hockey. Univ. of N. H. at 

Durham. 
Interfraternity basketball. Kappa 
Sigma vs. Q.T.V., and Sigma Phi 
Epsilon vs. Non-Fraternity. 
8 I-. m. Professor George P. Baker 
Of Vale. 
Saturday— 
Varsity basketball 

i ester. 
Varsity hockey. Bates Jt Lewiston. 
I r< -hman basketball. ' Springfield 
Evening H. S. at Springfield. 
Sunday — 

' I') a. m. Chapel. Sermon by 
Bishop Edwin H. Hughes, Metho- 
Episcopal Church, Chicago. 
Monday — 
!"'< rtraternity basketball. L amb da 
Chi Alpha vs. Alpha Sigma Phi, 
»l»d Alpha Gamma Rho vs. Kappa 
Epsilon, 
Tuesday— 

ty hockey. Amherst at Am- 
berat 

Iru.nlass hockey. 1929 vs. Two 
Vt ar. 



Professor George Peirce Baker of Yale 
will speak on "The Dramatist and his 
Training" next Friday evening at eight 
o'clock in Bowker Auditorium. Prof. 
Baker is well known because of his con- 
nection with the Harvard 47 Workshop 
at Harvard College. This organization 
was created by him and has trained a 
large number of successful professional 
playwrights. The lecture will l>e given 
under the auspices of the Roister Doister 
Dramatic Society and all who are inter- 
ested in dramatics of any form are cordi- 
ally invited to be present. 

Preceding the lecture, the Roister 
Doisters will have a supper in honor of 
Professor Baker in Draper Hall. Mem- 
bers of the Northampton Repertory Stock 
Company have been invited to attend 
the supper and those who are at liberty 
will be present. 



Huge Blaze Arouses 

Entire Student Body 

Poultry Plant Destroyed by Flames 
Despite Students' Snowballs. 



Aggie Five Adds Brown 

To Its List of Victims 



PLANS MADE FOR 

ALUMNI CELEBRATION 



Mid -Winter Day to Come on Feb. 6, 
Interfraternity Singing Planned. 



The Annual Mid-Winter Alumni home- 
coming has been scheduled for Saturday, 
Feb. <>. On the evening of this date the 
various fraternities will hold their initia- 
tion banquets. 

A new feature is being developed for 
this year's program. There will be an 
interfraternity singing contest in Bowker 
Auditorium at 2 o'clock Saturday after- 
noon. The Academic Activities Board is 
providing a suitable trophy to be awarded 
the successful competitor. 

The Athletic Department has arranged 
home games for both the hockey team and 
for the basket-ball team. An important 
meeting of the Associate Alumni will In- 
held and there will be ample opportunity 
for visiting alumni to participate in 
various games during the forenoon. The 
program is as follows: 

8 a. m. Registration, Memorial Hall. 
8 a. m to 11 a. m. Alumni games 
bowling, billiards, pool, 
horseshow pitching, basket- 
ball, etc. 

10 a. m. Varsity hockey game, M.A.C. 

vs. Middlebury. 

11 a. m. Business meeting of the 

Associate Alumni, Memorial 
Hall. 

1 p. m. Luncheon, Draper Hall, 

Alumni to be guests of the 
College. 

2 p. m. Interfraternity Singing Con- 

test, Bowker Auditorium. 
4 p. m. Varsity basketball game, M. 
A.C. vs. Holy Cross. 
Schedule of Fraternity Banquets: 
Q.T.V. — at house. 
Phi Sigma Kappa — The Davenport. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon — Hotel Nonotuck, 

Holyoke. 
Alpha Sigma Phi — Draper Hall. 
Kappa Gamma Phi — at house. 
Theta Chi — Weldon, Greenfield. 
Lambda Chi Alpha — Draper Hall. 
Alpha Gamma Rho— Hotel Nonotuck, 

Holyoke. 
Kappa fclpsilon — White House Inn, 

Northampton. 
Kappa Sigma — The Perry. 



At a little before 9.30 p. m. last Sunday 
night, the evening quiet hanging over the 
Aggie campus was broken by the roar of 
the fire truck. The question "Where's 
the fire?" was answered by a glance 
toward the west, where glowed a high, 
r.tl light. Entrancing visions of the 
ancient Drill Hall going up in flame and 
smoke furnished an incentive for even the 
most unemotional student to forget sleep, 
study, or any other occupation, and turn 
hurried steps in the direction of the fire. 
Intense was the disappointment of many 
when it was found that the source ot the 
conflagration was not the Drill Hall, but 
a 100-foot brooder house at the poultry 
plant. 

Fortunately, there were no chicks in 
the building at the time. The value of 
the property destroyed is estimated at 
about $700. The origin of the blaze is 
unknown, although several possible causes 
have been suggested. Experiments were 
being carried on for determing the best 
substitute for anthracite coal as a source 
of heat for incubator eggs and breeding 
chicks, and a possible explanation is that 
the accumulation of gas from the soft 
coal blew open the door of the heater, 
since several persons have re|>orted just 
that sort of trouble in the use of soft 
coal. Another theory advanced is that 
the cause, may have been some defect in 
the wiring. 

The alarm was rung in at 0.20 and in 
a very few minutes the building was .i 
mass of flames, and utterly beyond control 
of the local fire department. The feeble 
stream of water directed on the blaze was 
nearly as effective as the snowballs with 
which numerous iiieml>ersof the assembled 
crowd bombarded the building and each 
other. In a few minutes the structure 
was practically consumed, and as the 
crowd dispersed there was heard mans a 
dark prophecy concerning the probable- 
source of the next fire at M.A.t . 



Bruins Beaten 20 to 12 in Close Game. Smiley Stars as Agates 
Outscore Opponents Two to One in Last Half 



HOCKEY TEAM BEATS 
R. P. I. ON ROUGH ICE 



Aggie Sextet Wins First Victory of 
Season from Engineers by 2-1 Score. 



The Aggie hockey team brought home- 
its first victory by outplaying R.I'.I. at 
Troy by a score of 2 to I last Saturday. 
The ice was rough and in |>oor condition, 
while the visiting players were tired after 
their tussle with Hamilton on the previous 
clay. As a result, their teamwork was not 
very polished, but their efforts were l>etter 
than those of R.P.I. 

"Buddy" Moberg distinguished him- 
self in this contest, scoring both the 
Aggie goals and working relentlessly. 
K.P.I, tallied in the second period cm | 
rolling shot which eluded Palmer, but 
"Buddy" tied the count at the opening 
of the final period and added the winning 
goal towards the end of the game. The 
summary: 

M.A.C. R.P.I. 

Forest, Farwell, Iw rw, BoMe.ui 

Abrahamson, Mo!>erg, Swan, rw 

lw, (arson 



POPULAR PROGRAM BY 
SYMPHONY PLAYERS 



Boston Chamber Music Club Plays 
at Social Union Entertainment. 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

GIVES CONCERT 



First Performance is at 
Varied Program Presented. 



Ludlow. 



Last Friday evening, the Girls' Glee 
Club made its debut at Ludlow under 
the auspices of the Parent-Teachers 
Association of that town. Margaret 
Shea '26 and Janet Jones '90 assisted 
the club. The program was as follows: 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Lovers of good music were- given a 
splendid treat last Sunday afternoon by 
the Boston Chamber Music Club, com 
DOaad of Boston Symphony Orchestra 
men under the leadership of Julius 
Theodorowicz. This is the fourth con- 
secutive season that the Social Union 
has presented this well-known organiza- 
tion at M.A.C. A representative program 
of the more popular pieces of several well- 
known composers, gave an esjiecially 
pleasing entertainment to a large audience. 

Selections taken from "Rose Marie", 
one of the musical comedy successes of 
the past year, proved to be one of the 
most pleasing numbers on the program. 
Another selection which was well received 
was "By the Waters of Minnetonka" by 
Lieurance. This piece was a light, rip- 
pling selection with a plaintive melody 
running through it. Among the other 
numbers on the program were several 
favorites such as the "Dream of Love" 
by Liszt, and a selection from the opera. 
"Lucia de Lammermoor" by Donizetti. 
A new piece to many was the "Cinderella 
Bridal Procession" by Dicker. The 
latter was a charming piece which com- 
bined all the beauty and grandeur which 
would naturally be associated with the 
bridal procession of a fairy-tale heroine. 



Freshman Hoopsters 

Win Two Games 



Attleboro and Northampton Com- 
mercial Beaten by Yearlings. 



The freshman q uinte t won games from 
both Attleboro and Northampton Com- 
mercial College last week. The game 
with Attleboro was doubtful until t he- 
last minutes of play when the freshmen 
sank a foul shot deciding the game-. 
Robertson played well for the frosh and 
Moraski starred for Attleboro. 

The game with Northampton Com 

mereial was marked by the flex>r work of 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Me 



C, Coyle 

rd, Fitzgerald 

Id, Farepiahar 

g. Sears 

Coyle. Refctee 

•Namc-e. Time — .'I 



i 



Moberg, I'rese, c 
Potter, Id 

I- rise-, Abchamson, 
1'almer, g 

( ■oals — Moberg 
I ownshend and 
fifteen minute pericnU. 

The- hoc key sepiad is slated for a strenu- 
ous week U the we-ather is favorable, for 
they are- scheduled for games with Dart 
mouth, University of New Hampshire, 
and Bates. They will make the trip to 
Hanover on Wednesday and will return 
to Amherst the same night. Friday will 
see them at Durham, and on Saturday 
they will play on an indoor rink at Lewis 
ton, Maine. The- Dartmouth contest 
should prove to lx- the hardest in the lot. 



HAMILTON SEXTET 

WINS BY 5-2 SCORE 



Close Game Won in Closing Minutes. 



The- M.A.C. sextet was defeated by the 
Hamilton puc kstc-rs at Clinton, N. V. 
last Friday by a score of 5 to 2, but it was 
not until the final minutes of play that 
the struggle was decided, so closely were 
the two t«-ams matched. Hamilton drew 
first blood by a tally near the end of the 
first period, but the Aggies came back in 
the next session and swept the New 
Yorkers off their feet, keeping the pack 
well into Hamilton territory most of t he- 
time. No score was forthcoming, however, 
and it was not until the final period that 
M.A.C. counted, "Joe" Forest shooting 
the goal after a pass from Moberg. With 
ten minutes left to play, Van Vleet, the- 
Hamilton captain and the fastest man on 
the ice, skated around the end and scored. 
Fresh substitutes were- then sent in for 
Hamilton, and three- tallies followed in 
short order. Forest made the final goal 
for M.A.C. unassisted. 

"Joe" Forest's play was outstanding 

throughout the game, and Captain 
"Buddy" Moberg also acquitted himself 
well. "Dinty" Palmer made several 
sensational stops in front of the Aggie- 
cage-. The- work of the whole- team was 
cm client, but lack (A capable- substitute 
material was the cause- of the final dow,n 
fall after the strenuous second period. 
The summary: 

M.A.C. 
Forest, lw 

Abrahamson, Swan, rw 
Moberg, c 
Potter, Id 

Frese, rd 
Palmer, g 

Goals -Forest 2, Van Vleet 2, Bald 3. 
Substitutions by Hamilton — Borne-, Hcyl, 
Beardsley, Briggs, Ingalls. Referees— 
DeAngelis and Sherman. Time — three 
20-minute pe-rioels. 



Hamilton 

rw, Mann 
Iw, Mc Lean 

c , Van Vleet 

rd, llassard 

Id. Bald 

g, Stanley 



The unbeaten Aggie quintet added 
another victory to its still short list 
when it took in the Brown five last Friday 
at the Drill Hall, 20 to 12, in a rough and 
heated game. Brown plave<l a man to 
man game and did it well. The Agates 
wasted much time trying to get in shoot- 
ing distance and only one shot during 
the entire evening was made from t he- 
open. But the Agate-s according to their 
usual form made much trouble for the 
Brown marksmen. Larry Jones' waving 
arms and persistence warded off many a 
counter and Smiley who played almost 
superhum.uily not only prevented the 
Hears from tallying but he took the ball 
away from them and then clashed around 
more like a movie hero than a real man. 
as a very real pleasure to watch his 
and to see him as he got into the 
irf-h-e playing lietter as the play got 
tighter. 

Brown scored first from under the 
basket but Thomas sunk a free try and 
then tossed a floor basket from the foul 
line-. The score was tied however when 
Brown counted on a free try. Parten- 
heimet tallied following in from a long 
shot and Thomas raised the- le.nl i<, three 
with another free try. Brown counted 
again from underneath but Temple and 
Jones each added a |>omi from foul shots 
making an H to , r > score which was raised 
to S to ti just b elo w the hall ended Only 
two floor baske's each were- made in t he 
(list twenty minutes which gives some 
indication of how well the- defense- of l»oth 
teams functioned. The Brown men 
though small were- fast and always seemed 
to Im- in the way. Pivoting and boinni- 
pisses seemed to be- the only s.tKation 
for the Agates. On the- other hand t In- 
Brown men found it no easy matter to 
penetrate the- Aggie phalanx even by fast 
well learned plays. 

In the second half however the- Agates 
loomed up and out scored the- visitors two 
to one. Partenbciinir who seemed to lie 
followed by a jinx in the- fust |M-riocl 
registered twice-, Temple- tallied, Smiley 
Continued to shoot fouls faultlessly, while 
Kelso added another long shot to his 
1IH) percenl average. Brown scored first, 
a foul and a lloor basket putting the-m- 
si Ives in the- lead '.I to g, Smiley however 
sunk three- free- tries in (he next lew 

minutes followed by another one by 

Thomas bringing the count to \2 to it. 

The Agates still continued their "feeding 

(Continued on Pat* 2) 



Interfraternity 



Basketball 



As a result of the six games played the 
past week interfraternit y basketball is 
arousing considerable- interest. Most of 
the- teams have- played two games. Kappa 
Epsilon, Lambda Chi Alpha, and Alpha 
Gamma Rho are tied for the leael so far. 
The- following are the results of games 
played last week: 

Phi Sigma Kappa 15, Kolony Klub '.i. 

Sigma I'hi Kpsilon 2.1, A. T. C. 8. 

Alpha Sigma Phi 12, Kappa Sigma .">. 

Alpha Gamma Rho 17, Nob fret, i. 

lambda (In Alpha %9, Theta (hi .i. 

Kappa Epsilon 18, Kappa Gamma Phi 4 



Goodwin Appointed 

Alumni Secretary 



Alumnus Fills "Dick" Mellen's 
Position as Field Agent and Alumni 
Secretary. 



The position recently occupied by 

Richard A. Mellen of Field Agent ami 

taut Alumni Secretary has recently 
bean filled by William I. Goodwin '20. 

Mr. Goodwin, immediately alter gradua- 
tion held a poaition in the Agricultural 

Division of the I'niled States ( e-iisiis 
Bureau. In 1833 lie taught at the Tinted 

States Vocational School al Baal Norfolk, 

Mass. In 1021, when this school was 
discontinued, he was transferred to 

agricultural field service under the- Pmvi- 

dence office oi the 1'S.. Veterans' Bureau. 









THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 20, 1926 







- 









TIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 
Mart T. Boyd '26 Editor-in-Chief 

Jqhm F. Lambert '26 Managing Editor 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 




Editorial 




Mary T. Boyd 


•26 


Cider Preu 

Athletic* 




Mary T. Boyd 
William L. Dole 
Harold L Clark 


•26 
•27 
'28 




L. 


Kockwkm. Smith, Jr. 


■2S 


Campus New* 




Ernest L. Spencer 
Ellsworth Barnard 


•28 

•28 






Edward H. Nichols. 


■2<» 






William R. I'hinney. 


•29 


Co-Ed News 
Alumni 




Frances C. Bruce 
Josephine Panzica 


27 
'28 


Faculty News 




W. Gordon Hunter 


'29 



ill soiiii- (aws hit hard, but M are not 
lik«- the "rts|H(tal)U- uti/rns" who give 
■tlHaCC imfJCCl only to tha laws of l'ro 
hiliition. M.A.C men arc aUw all k<mmI 
sports, and even those hardest hit will 
admit the essential need lor the imposition 
of a tuition dttfffe 

Incidentally, this matter of tuition 
may have a vital •fleet u|>on the general 
attitude towards the college. It is a 
curious twist of human nature that makes 
us value what we cannot have for the 
asking — the free gift is never cherished 
as is the thing we pay for. A college 
education is a valuable possession, but 
as | gift from the state, it is less valued 
than the education bought at a price. 
An odd psychological quirk, but un- 
deniably true. 




BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Alvim G. Stevens "26 Business Manager 

Edwin A. Wilder28 Advertising Manager 

Lewis H. Whitaker '27 Circulation Manager 

John E. White "27 

Douglas W. Lorino '28 

Charles F. Clagg '27 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



AT THE ABBEY 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in section 1 103, Act ol Oc- 
tober, 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



Tuition and the Student 

Between this much discussed matter of 
tuition and that hardy discussion peren- 
nial, Prohibition, there is a close analogy. 
Both are, in the long run, for the best 
interest of the most people. And both 
belong to the class of legislation generally 
approved in principle but refused con- 
sideration as self-applicable in certain 
individual cases. 

"Prohibition," you sometimes hear, "is 

a good thing for the country. I'm strong 

thing in the world for the 

n. But now take me — I 

to drink before Prohibition, 

going to have anyone inter- 

my personal liberties. 1 can 

take it or leave it — but say, I know a guy 

who can get you all you want of the real 

stuff for only ." and so on, with the 



unconscious and weakly selfish implica 
tion of, "It's good for others, but it 
interferes with my pleasure, so I won't 
obey the law. And anyway, I'm differ- 
ent. 

We must all agree that the college 
should charge a tuition fee. We are one 
of the last colleges to adopt this method 
of attempting to lighten the heavy ex- 
penses of college maintenance. The pro- 
posed tuition is, practically, nominal, and 
beyond all question fair and reasonable. 
We, as a student body, must and do 
approve the step taken. But, in many 
cases we as individuals cannot subscribe 
to the project with any degree of cordi- 
ality. 

The majority of M.A.C. students are 
at least partially self-supporting; many 
are entirely so. This is not an "easy'' 
college, and keeping up even passing 
grades requires many hours of serious 
study. In addition, there are athletic and 
academic and social obligations which 
must, in some form or other, be met by 
everyone. This strictly collegiate program 
in itself takes up a working man's day of 
hours. Add to it the labor requirement in 
hours necessary to self support, and you 
have a man-size program. To the self- 
supporting student twenty dollars a term 
is a serious matter. Taking this as an 
average of two dollars a week, and trans- 
lating it into labor hours at the rate of 
thirty-five cents an hour, we find that 
approximately six hours a week must be 
added to the working schedule. In cer- 
tain cases, this extra six hours load will 
be the proverbial straw breaking the 
camel's back; and, theoretically, the 
college will be poorer by the loss of some 
of its excellent but overworked students. 
Such men naturally cannot whole- 
heartedly applaud the prospect of paying 
tuition. And, just as naturally, some men 
will not enter college who otherwise 
might. (That, however, works both ways 
—we may lose some good men, but we 
may also be spared some men not so good, i 
In this connection, the certainty of an 
increased number of scholarships must be 
taken into consideration. Student aid 
will be available on a larger scale than 
ever before, and it is safe to predict that 
no man of recognized worth and ability 
will Ik> forced to leave or stay away from 
college simply because he is unable to 
meet the tuition charges. 

To the principle of tuition we must all 
heartily subscribe; as individuals it will 



About the Sings 

"Well, sir," said the Old Grad, "I 
tell you how I feel about this Class Sing 
question. We used to sing a lot. We 
liked to get together and sing — it meant 
a lot to us. And songs are powerful 
factors in bringing back memories. One 
of the big features of Commencement 
for me was standing with all my old 
classmates around me and hearing new 
generations of students blending their 
voiics in the good old songs in the good 
old way. That meant a lot to us alumni. 
Nowadays, students haven't any college 
feeling." — and the Old Grad shook his 
batd sorrowfully over the shortcomings 
of the present generation. 

"No, that's wrong," said the Re|>orter. 
"Times are different, that's all. The 
spirit's the same." 

"But they've discontinued the Class 
Sings," objected the Old (irad. 

"Yes," the Reporter admitted, "They 
did— for a while. As I said, times have 
changed, and June wasn't a good time 
for the Sings any more. The boys wanted 
to get home." 

"They used to wait," said the Old 
Grad, unconvinced. 

"Yes, but the campus bounded the cam- 
pus then. Now it doesn't. But," said the 
Reporter, "Everything's all fixed up now. 
The Interfraternity Sing is the best 
|H)ssible solution. It gives smaller groups 
of men, who can get together easily for 
practice. That will set a higher standard 
for the singing than ever before. Then 
naturally the competition between groups 
will be keen.' Everybody will be in on 
the singing, and the Sing will come in 
winter, when there's not so much doing 
and so interest will Ik- focused on it. It 
will Ik- a real college event. It ought to 
make everybody happy — the alumni most 
of all. The Sing will come at their winter 
gathering, and they can listen to the old 
songs with memories undisturbed by little 
Alumnus Jr. pulling at their hand and 
saying 'Papa, look at the funny men 
with skirts on' when the Seniors sing." 

"It's not the same," said the Old Grad 
stubbornly. 

"No," said the Reporter conclusively, 
"It's not. It's better. You alumni get a 
real personal interest this way. Before, 
you didn't really care which class won. 
Now, you'll be rooting for your own 
fraternity. That makes it twice as 
interesting. It's been a problem, but 
the students themselves have solved it. 
Satisfactorily, too. Don't you think so." 
And the Old Grad said, "Yes." 



Let's Go Skiing! 

Prof. Hicks wants the students to take 
an interest in Winter sports. Other 
colleges do. We have a brand new ski 
and tolMiggan slide. We have skiis and 
snowshoes and toboggans. We have en- 
thusiasm. We should like to give Prof. 
Micks the pleasure of watching us descend 
the hill on one ear (a customary ski-ing 
position) or toboggan down the great 
white spaces. We are willing and anxious 
to begin. There is only one thing we lack 
for our winter of sports. Snow! 

Might it not be possible to come to 
some profitable arrangement with the 
weather man, perhaps trading him a 
dozen rainy Spring term days for, say, 
three good days of good hard snow now? 
Same to take place immediately and at 
once. CP 



CO-ED NOTES 

At Draper Hall on Monday evening, 
Delta Phi Gamma held its annual banquet. 
Besides the regular members there were 
present several honorary members and 
"sorores in urbe". The speakers of the 
evening were Miss Skinner, Ruth Putnam 
'26, Ella Buckler '27, and Elisabeth 
Morey '28. 

M 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Merryman of 
Bradford, Mass., announce the marriage 
of their daughter, Rebecca, to James 
Halley of West Newbury, Vt. Mrs. 
Halley was a member of the Two Year 
'25 class. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 20. 1926 



HOW THE STATE SAVES MONKY 



Illustrating Results of More Business 
in Government. 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

(Continued from Page 1) 

The Eairies' Revelry Gabriel- Marie 

( ".lee Club 

Beethoven-Branscombe 
Double Trio 



Minuet 



Dance 



Janet Jones 
Dawn's Awakening Edward Grieg 

Glee Club 
Trees Oscar Rasbach 

Slumber Song Schubert 

Double Trio 

Danny Boy Old Irish A ir 

Fiddle and I Goodeve 

Frances Thompson 

La Spagnola Yimenzo di Chiara 

Glee Club and Janet Jones 
Cake Walk Dehussey-Gallncay 

Lora Batchelder 
Stunt 

Marion (assidy and Margaret Shea 
Betty at the Baseball Game 

Dorothea Williams 
Southern Hush Softg Lynn 

Florian's Song Gadard-Lytics 

1 )oublc Trio 
Maidens Wish 



Our Campus Repartee 

In these cold days many a loyal son of 
old Massachusetts (you must remember 
that this includes what the lecturers in- 
variably call "the women students of this 
institution" too), heartily concurs with 
Harry Lauder's famous remark, "It's nice 
to get up in the morning, but it's nicer to 
lie in your bed." However, the bell sys- 
tem announcing class hours is all too 
efficient, and occasionally the existing 
bed-to-classroom records are shattered 
by a phenomenal exhibition of the speed 
|io-*sible to a young gentleman with a 
desire to sleep but no cuts left. 

Keeping, this in mind, consider the Hill, 
the long upward way between the Abbey 
and the Math building. Half way up it, 
two of those rare fortunates with a lab 
to which they can with impunity be as 
late as ten whole minutes. Passing them, 
full speed ahead, one of the rest of us, 
with an improved version of the Pike's 
Peak slogan, "Be there or Bust." This 
latter forges pass amid a shower of de- 
risive comments. Then comes the inevi- 
table taunt "Trying to make it on high, 
huh?" This is too much — it always is. 
"I hope to — eventually," snaps the 
harrassed one over her shoulder, and then 
steps out a little faster even. 

Will someone kindly complete the 
phrase by adding, "Why Not Now?" 
Thank you, — that takes the "Gold 

Medal". CP 

Ludlow "s 57 Varieties 

The Girls' Glee Club took their first 
shot at concert work last week. We 
understand that the performance was a 
success, but that the audience was a 
novelty. 57 citizens solemnly filed into 
the hall and tested out the new diversion. 
57 — count 'em — 57. Make your own 
puns about the Heinz-ed but unpickled 
audience. We swore off for one of our 
annual New Year's short term resolutions. 

CP 

Wordsworth Again 

Mr. Wordsworth, whose mind was a 
rose garden, and who experienced a rosy 
glow when beholding such various objects 
as primroses, daffodils, violets, (provided 
they were by a mossy stone and half 
hidden to anything except a poet's eye), 
has undergone a good deal of criticism, 
by and large. The latest addition to the 
already large volume of Parodies Words- 
worthiana is this Botanist's version : 
"He loved peculiar flowers and rare 
For any flower he did not care 

That he had seen before. 
Primroses by the river's brim 
Dicotyledons were to him 

And they were nothing more." 
Excepting perhaps Primula acaulis and a 
few other little things like that. 
CP 



FRESHMAN HOOPSTERS 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Webber and Kelley and the defensive 
game put up by Cox. Coukos was high 
scorer. Tilley featured for Commercial. 

The lineups: 

M.A.C. Freshmen — rf Weblier, If 
Kelley, c Coukos, rg Robertson, lg Cox. 

Attleboro — lg Gay, Moraski, rg Rogers, 
c Newman, If Worall, rf Kneeland. 

Final score — M.A.C. Freshman 12, 
Attleboro 11. 

M.A.C. Freshmen— rf Webber, If 
Kelley, c Coukos, rg Roberton, lg Cox. 

Northampton— lg Kelly, Keefe, rg 
Smith, c Burke Keefe, If Tilley, rf Teahan. 

Score at end of first half — Freshmen l.">, 
N. C. C. 11. Final score — Freshmen 30, 
N. C. C. 20. Referee— Ball. 



AGGIE FIVE 

(Continued from Page 1) 
around" tiring the Brown men and 
watching for an opening. The first chance 
came when Partenheimer tossed the ball 
through from underneath. Soon after 
Brown had registered with another free 
shot they let up momentarily but long 
enough to give Temple an opportunity to 
dribble to the basket and loop the sphere 
through for two more points. Parten- 
heimer pushed another through on a 
follow-in try making the score 18 to 10. 
The Brown center changed the tune 
momentarily when he succeeded in scor- 
ing two for Brown but Kelso who had 
replaced Thomas added the last points 
from an angle and outside the end zone. 

Owing to a mistake of the Wesleyan 
manager the Wesleyan game which was 
to be played this week has had to be 
postponed. The game will be played 
February 12, after the Social Union 
program, probably at about 8..J0. 

The summary: 

M.A.C. B.F.P. Brown B.F.P. 

Temple.lf 1 1 3 Rohiss.rb 1 2 

P't'h'mer.rf 3 6 Hunt.lb 1 1 

Jones.c 1 1 Banzell.c 1 2 

Murd'gh.c Hayes.rf 1 2 4 

Thomas.lb 1 3 5 Reed.lf 1 1 3 

Kelso.lb 1 2 Good.lf 

Smiley.rb 3 3 



Certain purchases now have to be madt 
through the State Purchasing Agent. The 
following cases, all of them occurring 
within the last three months, show the 
saving involved but fail to show the ex- 
pense inherent in overhead machinery. 

Item 1. Tractor Harrow. Bid t+. 
mitted on harrow set up and delivered at 
the College, $1 1 1.50 less 10$. Net H0O3& 
The institution was required to purchav 
through the State Purchasing Agent. The 
State Purchasing Agent secured the same 
harrow at $110 less 2%, delivered in knock 
down on board car. The total cost to the 
State was as follows: purchase price. Si 10 
less 2% or $108.80; freight, $3.05; setting 
up, $4. Delay in filling order, three week* 
Net saving, minus $14.50. 

Item 2. Drainage Tile. Net pdcsj 
secured, tile delivered at Amherst, as 
follows, the prices being from two different 
companies: 

4-inch tile— $47.04 and $47.51 per M 
8-inch tile— $146.02 and $14X.K0 per M 
The purchase was made by the State 
Purchasing Agent, at the following net 
prices: 

4-inch tile— $52.96 per M 
8-inch tile— $152.95 per M 
In the quantity ordered, this made a 
difference of over $25 between the price 
paid and the lower bid obtained. An 
interesting thing in the above is that the 
tile were bought on the same specifications 
and from the same company from whom 
we obtained the higher bid. 

Item 3. Oats. The institution was 
able to purchase from a local dealer, 38- 
pound oats, bagged, delivered, at a price 
of 58 cents per bushel. It was required 
by the State Purchasing Agent to purchase 
oats in bulk, not delivered, weight not 
stated, at price stated as "53 cents per 
bushel if taken before November 15." 
Order for the purchase was not received 
until ten days later. The books of the 
State Purchasing Agent may show a 
saving of five cents a bushel. Actually, 
increased cost of handling bulk oats, and 
uncertainty as to quality and price make 
the saving very problematical. 

The State has expensive machinery for 
making purchases. It apparently should 
be able to make a saving. The great 
problem for the tax-payers of the State 
is, after all, not the handicap on efficient 
administration which it may impose, but 
why are the savings so small and meager, 
or even entirely negative? 

— Alumni Bulletin. 



Totals 

Score at half tim 
Referee — Whalen. 
periods. 



6 820 Totals 



4 412 



-M.A.C. 8, Brown 6. 
Time — 20-minute 



MEIKLEJOHN DISREGARDS 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 



Former Amherst President Admits 
Students of Promise Who Have Not 
Completed Preparatory Work. 



Summer Wind 



College Songs 



Chopin-Satf 

Bischof 



Glee Club 



( die Club 



We Poets 
"Everyone," our Assembly speaker told 
us. "is a poet." Maybe, but most of us 
are very much the "mute inglorious 
Miltons" specified by another poet some 
years ago. We do have, of course, the 
poetry of motion — if that holds good for 
our customary campus rapid transit. 
And now that the Stein school of verse 
is accepted, almost any occupation may 
be translated into poetry, provided the 
dictionary and your own vocabulary holds 
out. You know the sort of thing — for 
instance: 

Garbage Cans 
Old soup tins — 

Smells-^a piece of pink string — 
Mouldy bread — 
An old powder puff — 
Dishes — debris — 
Crash! 
Some Miltons should be still muter! 

CP 

And that's that! 



FRATERNITY AVERAGES 

The Dean's Office recently issued the 
scholastic averages of the fraternal groups 
for the college year 1924-25. The figures 
speak for themselves. The averages 
follow : 

Delta Phi Alpha 79.5 

Alpha Gamma Rho 78.9 

Kappa Gamma Phi 78.1 

Phi Sigma Kappa 77.6 

Q. T. V 77.3 

Kappa Sigma 76.9 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 76.87 

Kappa Epsilon 76.3 

Delta Phi Gamma (sor). . . .76.1 

ThetaChi 76.1 

Alpha Sigma Phi 75.7 

Non-Frat or Sor 75.4 

Lambda Chi Alpha 74.4 



St. John's University, Annapolis, Md., 
where Dr. Meiklejohn, Wesleyan's recent 
guest, holds a professorship, has declared 
itself in favor of giving men of mature 
age an opportunity for a college education, 
even though their preparatory work may 
not have been sufficient to meet the en- 
trance requirements. Consequently, they 
have passed a ruling whereby men who 
display superior intellectual ability may 
be admitted as special students, irrespec- 
tive of the extent of their preparatory 
studies. Three men have already been 
accepted by the university under this 
ruling, and in two cases the students 
have attained a general average of B in 
their first two year's work, which has 
given them regular standing in the uni- 
versity. 

— Wesleyan Argiis. 



FRASER RESIGNS 

Harry E. Fraser '26 of Jamaica Plain 
has been forced to resign his positions as 
manager of the Musical Clubs and leader 
of the Orchestra because of ineligibility. 
Lewis H. Whitaker '27 of Hadley, who 
has been acting as assistant manager of 
the clubs, will take over Eraser's duties 
as manager. 



. Co-eds 

{With apologies to William Wordsworth) 
The Co-ed's too much with us; morn and 

noon, 
Getting and spending, she lays waste our 

powers: 
We buy her gifts of rings and flowers, 
And dance with her to a jazz-time tune. 

This "she" that bares her soul to every 
man, 

And breaking rules goes walking after 
hours, 

And talks of Life, and Love, and sun- 
kissed bowers, 

Will bring us to an end that only woman 
can. 

She moves me not. — Good Night! 1 d 

rather be 
A wanderer onthe blist'ring sands 
Than linger where I have to see 
Poor foolish man do tricks at her com- 
mand. 

—The New Hampshire. 



Harry T. Mortensen, instructor ■ 
Microbiology, left the college at the end 
of last term. His place is being filled W* 
porarily by Mrs. Leon A. BradU 
of Dr. Bradley, who is assistant pP 
of Microbiology. 




Where can you get finer fabrics, better styling, more enduring good looks than in 

HlCKEY-FREEMAN Customized Clothes 

— Honestly, we don't know. 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

The Best in Drug Store Service 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

Th» %e*aJbL Storm 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 



IS AT 



DRURY'S 



College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURTS BAKERY 



NORTHAMPTON 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

Paul Hansell, Mgr. 



THIS WEEK 

The tortuampton Repertory Company 



-IN— 



"THREE LIVE GHOSTS" 

By Max Marcin and Frederick I sham 

Week of Jan. 25— "CANDIDA" 

By SHAW 



Week of Feb. l-"LOYALTIES" 

By GALSWORTHY 

Evening* at 8.15 Sat. Mat. at 2.15 

Prices: 50c. to $1.10. (including tax) 

Phone 435 



EXPERIMENT STATION NOTES 



TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 3258 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



Many iihmuIhts of tin- faculty .md 
Ex|K*riiiu-iit Station stall win- present at 
the eighth annual meeting of the agri- 
cultural organizations of this state which 
was held in Worcester last week. AflKMsf, 
those who took part in the program 
were A. I. Bourne of the Kxperimeiit 
Station, ('. J. Kaweett and VV. ('. Mon.i 
han of the Extension Service. 

At the Eruit (Grower's session, Prof. 
Ralph A. Van Meter was elected a Vice 
President and Prof. Fred C. Sears, State 
Vice-President, for the New England 
Eruit Show. 

M 

"Research Service to the Massachusetts 
Apple Industry," is the title of a new 

bulletin which is about to U- betted by the 

Hx|>crimcnt Station. The bulletin is a 
progress rc|K>rt and contains recently 
gathered data on diseases, pests, sprays, 
pruning, and grafting. 

M 

At the annual meeting of about 250 
members of the Massachusetts Fruit 
Growers' Association held in Worcester, 
January 6 and 7, many problems of great 
interest to fruit growers of New England 
were discussed. Mr. R. A. Van Meter 
and Dr. Shaw, both from M.A.C, to- 
gether with several others, presented 
paj>ers on a ten year plan of development 
for the industry. Mr. H. W. Yount of the 
Department of Agricultural Economics, 
spoke about the Apple Survey. Mr. A. 
I. Bourne of the Experiment Station, to- 
gether with several others, spoke on |xst 
control. Mr. W. R. Cole, the secretary 
of the Association, presented one of the 
papers about advertising. The certifica- 
tion of nursery stock standardization of 
lockages, and standard grades of fruit 
for New England, were other topics which 
claimed the attention of the Association. 
M 

The Experiment Station is initiating a 
Purnell Project on the subject of the 
condition and effect of the health on the 
rural school |x>pulation. Miss Helen P. 
Knowlton, Assistant Professor of Home 
Economics, is the leader of the Project, 
and for a six months' |>eri(xl commencing 
January 1, will l>e on a leave of absence 
from college teaching for the puri>ose of 
initiating this research. 




WMGLEYS 



RK. 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



('. A. Andrews, vice-president of the 
American Greenhouse Manufacturing Co., 
will give a talk on greenhouse construction 
Tuesday, January 2'i at 2.45 p. m. in 
French Hall, Room F. The talk will be 
illustrated by moving pictures. 



NEW HANDY PACK 

Fits hand - 
pocket and purse 

Mora for your money 
and tha best Pepnarmlat 
Chewing Sweat for any money 

Look for Wrigley's P. K. Handy Pack 
«p on your Dealcr'i Counter 07 jfc 



SATISFACTION UUARANTKKI) 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUNSINGWEAR and NEDALIA 
SILK HOSE 

BIC; ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $U9 $1.75 

G. Edward Fisher 

S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STRKET. (up on* Mint) 

Oculists Prescriptions Filled. Broken lenses 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 



275 High St. 



Hoi yoke 



S H oe S 

— AND— 

HOSIERY 

of Quality and Fashion for 
M. A. C. Students 

Harry B. Berman, 1930 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

At our Fountain You Can Satisfy Your Hunger or Thirst. Hot Waffles 

Sandwiches— Doughnuts— Cereals — Coffee — Cocoa — Milk Shakes — Sodas 

Cigars Cigarettes Tobacco Candy 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



A group of freshmen is organizing a 
discussion class, to meet Sunday after- 
noons at two o'clock in the Memorial 
Building. Mr. Manna is the leader of 
the group. The first topic to lie discussed 
is "Can we do without the Church?" 
Anyone interested is invited to come. 



There was a meeting of the M.A.C. 
Florists' and Cardeners' Club in French 
Hall last Thursday evening, January 14, 
at 7.30 o'clock. Lantern slides dealing 
with wild flower preservation were shown. 



GOING STRONG- 
Our Pre-inventory Clearance Sale 

is still in full swing and affords you an 
opportunity to buy well tailored suits and 
overcoats especially adapted to the 
college man at very low prices . . . 

SEE US SOON 



F. M. Thompson & Son 



Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST & DEACON. Propt. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 



READY TO WEAR 



AMHERST. MASS. 



You will And an eicellanc 

. . . SIIOK REPAIRING SHOP . . . 
equipped with the moot up-to-date Goodyear 
Machinery and a modern 

_.... •■<>.« .f lltiWC PARLOR 

at IIJ Amlty-St.. . Labrovlti Block 

We understand your requirements and are pre- 

pared to meet your needs. 

A II work guaranteed. Shoes skined and dyed 

VINCENT GRANDONICO, Prop. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Welt 

NEW PRICES 

Men'i Whole Soles. Rubber Heels - . . f 2 ■■ 

Men • Half Soles. Rubber Heels . . . 1 7« 

Men . Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels . . i'» 

Men s Half Soles , |J 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOUSE 
Open till 8 P. M. 



FREE 

CRANK CASE 

SERVICE for 

FOUNTAIN PENS 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

(SUPPLY LIMITED) 

The New College Store 



M BUILDING 



SPECIAL THINGS 

for 
Special Students 



SING LEE "AND LAUNDRY 

No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Maes 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed 
REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OP 

price's™ DONE AT «*a&nablb 

Opposite Post Office 



WE'RE NO PROPHETS— -BUT!! 



The weather we have been talking about is here. The time has come when B.V.D. needs a friend. One of our Sheepskins or one of our unexcelled 

Overcoats that we are selling at a discount of 20 per cent will be a good companion 

CARL H. BOLTER 

AMHERST 



Exeter 



Hyannis 






I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 20, 1926 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thura. 

S.M. 

7.3« 



I Betty Hronnon, Turn Moore 
.nidKsih r Ralston In James 
M Barrie's 

' A KISS rOR 
C1NDKKK1.LA " 
from the famous stufte suc- 
ieKH pluyed by Maud Adams. 
Not a fairy stoi y, but a vivid 
appealing modern romance. 
News Fable* Comedy 
No advance In price* 



Friday 

3.M 

6.45. S.M 



NOTE BOOKS PAPER 

ALL THE NECESSARY EQUIPMENT TO 

AGGIE 




STATIONERY 

START THE NEW TERM 

INN ^ 



Peter the Great In 

"WILD JUSTICE" 
A dos hero you will love In 
a atory that will thrill and 
amaze with Its ewlf t adven- 
ture. A story of the North. 
Hod fte Podfie 2 reel Comedy 



Saturday 

mi 

t.45 S.3t 



Mon. 

3.00 
6.45 H..M) 



Raymond Griffith and Mar- 
ion Nlion In 

•HANDS UP" 
Ray and his hlfth hat have 
hit home attain with another 
hilarious comedy laid In the 
Civil War period. Andwhat 
a comedy It Is! 
News Educational Comedy 



Bebe Daniels, Neil Hamilton 
and Ann Cornwall In 
"THE SPLENDID CRIME" 
Wm. DeMllle has produced 
a clever crook drama, a ro- 
mance of a female Raffles. 
Pat he Review 

Clyde Cook Comedy 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni Richard Mellen, Art Sec'y 

Memorial Hall R ichard Mellen, Mgr 



COLLEGE SHOES 

— AT — 

TOWN PRICES 



M.A.C. Athletic Association 
Academic Activities . 
The College Senate . 
Track Association 
Baseball Association . 
Football Association . 
The Collegian . 
Hockey Association . 
Basketball Association 
Roister Doisters . 
Musical Clubs . 

1920 Index 

1927 Index 

M.A.C. Christian Association . 
Public Speaking and Debating 



C. S. Hicks, General Mgr. 
Frank P. Rand, Mgr. 
Lawrence L. Jones, Pres. 
J. E. Greenaway, Mgr. . 
William L. Dole, Mgr. . 
Francis W. Warren, Mgr. 
Mary T. Boyd, Editor 
Donald R. Williams, Mgr. 
Preston Davenport, Mgr. 
Philip N. Dow, Mgr. 
Harry E. Fraser, Mgr. . 
Myron Smith, Mgr. . 
Kenneth W. Milligan, Mgr. 
Roy E. Norcross, President 
Raymond Smith, Mgr. . 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



We have just received another large 
assortment of OVERSHOES at different 
prices. Avoid being too late. 

Hosiery a Specialty 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

Get your skates out and let us put on a 
sharpening that lasts. If you haven't got 
a pair, come in and ask to see our line of 
skates, shoes, hockey sticks, etc. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the best in everything 

You Have Your Choice 

OF OVER 

300 Styles of 

Greeting Cards 

at 

MISS CUTLER'S 

..GIFT SHOP.. 



A new Holstein bull, Sir Star Inka 
Su|>erior 400480, valued at $2500 has 
just l>een purchased from the Minnesota 
Holstein Company of Austin, Minn. The 
bull, born March 6, 1925, was sired by 
Sir Inka Superior 313447, who was the 
sire of the first prize Get-of-Sire group at 
the National Dairy Show in 1925. 

The dam, Star Segis Homestead 701950, 
has been a consistant winner in the show 
ring every year since she was a calf. In 
1922 she was the All- American calf. In 
1924 she was the second prize two year 
Old, and in 1925, the second prize three 
year old in the National Dairy Show. 
The full brother to the dam was the 
Junior Champion bull at the 1038 National 
Dairy Show, and he and the dam of Sir 
Star Inka Superior made the first prize 
Produce-of-Dean group. In addition to 
bring a show cow, the dam has an advance 

legtetry record aaa two year old of 13,888.8 

pounds of milk, and 821 rounds of butter 
fat. with a percentage test for the year 
of 4.S percent. 

Several of the Floriculture students are 
practicing lor the Intercollegiate Carna- 
tion Judging Contest to be held in 
Host on, January 29. The contest is to 
lie held under the auspices of the Ameri- 
can Carnation Society at its annual 
convention and exhibition. Three teams 
will compete, the other two being from 
Connecticut Aggie and Rhode Island 
State. 




Do College Students Insure Their Lives? 
The Answer Seems to be "Yes" 

Do You Know 

That in a test recently made with upper-class 
students of both sexes in fourteen representative 
colleges, 140 out of 351 said they carried life Insur- 
ance policies? 




It is significant that 40% of 
undergraduates have insur- 
ance on their lives— a notable 
advance over what prevailed 
twenty, or even ten, years ago. 
This shows that college stu- 
dents and their parents think 
life insurance is of consider- 



able use in connection with 
the educational program. 
Parents believe in it because 
they have something invested 
for the benefit of their chil- 
dren. Students realize that 
their lives have an economic 
value. 



The John Hancock is particularly interested (n insurint college men and 
women ami in obtaining co.lege graduates (or the personnel of the field staff. 



'*>. 



Andrew W. Love '25, who has been 
recently taking a course in teacher- 
training, is serving as apprentice teacher 
at the Essex County Agricultural School. 



A STRONG COMPANY. 
Over Sijkv Yesrs in Busi- 
ness. Liberal as to Con- 
tract, S'fe and Secure in 
Every Way. 




: Company* 

Of DOVTQM, MAIIACMUlini 



ljUV every way. — , ©o^o-. m*.»*c««»stt» X ml. 



Aft 



JAMES A. LOWELL, BOOKSELLER 



Webster's Collegiate Dictionary 

Cloth 

Imitation Leather - 
Leather - - - - 



$5.00 
6.00 
7.50 



. . . a pipe 
and P. A. 



Gem Dictionary 

50c 75c $1.00 




SPECIAL 

Pre-Inventory Prices 

on all broken lines of 

"BOSTONIANS" 






B0LLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



WHEN you've kicked off the pumps and tossed 
the collar on the table, while the music is still 
singing in your brain and memories of one 
dancing deb in particular crowd your thoughts, 
fill your pipe with Prince Albert and light up. 
Make it a night of nights. 

P. A. is so genuinely friendly. It hits your 
smoke-spot in deep center right off the bat. 
Doesn't bite your tongue or parch your throat, 
because the Prince Albert process said "nix on 
the rough stuff" at the very beginning. Just 
cool contentment in every perfect puff. 

Don't put off till tomorrow what you can 
smoke today. Get a tidy red tin of P. A. now. 
Snap back the hinged lid and release that won- 
derful fragrance. Tamp a load into the bowl 
of your jimmy-pipe and light up. Now you've 
got it . . . that taste. Say — isn't that the 
goods now? 

>RINEE ALBERT 

— no other tobacco is like it! 



© lOtO. H. J. Reynolds Tobseeo 
Company. Wlnston-Salem.N. C. 




P. A. it soli everywhere m 
n'sfy reel tint, found and half, 
pound tin humidors, and 
pound cryital-glats humidor! 
with tpongt -moislener top. 
And always with every bit of 
bit* and parch removed fry 
the Prince Albert procett. 




FINAL CLEARANCE— 

All Overcoats now reduced to $20 to $30 



Also many bargains in winter suits 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAULT 



I 



LIBRA 
Ma 



®lij> jHa00arfjtta?tt0 fflnlrtftntt 



Vol. xxxvi. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, JAN. 27, 1926 



Grant and Miss Shea 

Have Leading Parts 

popular Pair of Seniors to Play Parts of Young Marlowe and 
Miss Hardcastle in Prom Show 



Once again the tryouts for the annual 
l> n „u Show have come around and once 
,,,iu Margaret Shea and Theodore (irant, 
both of the class of '2(5, are taking the 
leading parts. Miss Shea is taking the 
pgrt of Miss Hardcastle and Theodore 
(irll „ it taking the part of Young Mar 
l„ wl . in the annual show which is "She 
s„„,|,s to Conquer". A large number 
tttr( . present at the tryouts last W'ednes- 
,| iiv night which should assure a cast of 
exceptional ability. Rehearsals for the 
,,la\ will begin in alxiut a week. 

The cast which was selected as a result 
of the tryouts is as follows: 



sir Charles Marlowe 

VuuiiK Marlowe 

ll.inluistlr 

listings 

Tony Lumpkin 

DiMtory 

Roger 

Dick 

Thom.i- 

Landlord 

■m 

Jeremy 

(irooni 

Brurward 

Mr- Hardcastle 

Mi- N<-\ i!l<- 
Mi- Hardcastle 

Dolly 

.ndtTstudy 
s/a understudy 



Emery Loud "26 

Theodore Grant '26 

Kenneth Bartlett '28 

Robert Fox '28 

Neil Robinson '27 

Frank Homeyer '28 

Thomas Campion '28 

Leonard Morrison '29 

Donald Campbell '28 

Emery Loud '26 

Frank Homeyer '28 

Thomas Campion '28 

Donald Campbell '28 

Leonard Morrison '29 

Irene Bartlett '29 

Miriam Huss '29 

Margaret Shea '26 

Marguerite Bosworth '26 

James Sheridan 'M 



Actor Speaks 

At Assembly 

Clifford Marie, of Northampton 
Repertory Company Deplores Lack 
of Interest In Theatre. 



MAJ. BRISCOE TAKES 
COMMAND OF R.O.T.C. 



Successor to Major Kobbe to Organize 
Polo Team. 



Marguerite Bosworth '26 
'•'-""'V forTony LU, "" 1 t 011 ar,l Morrison 29 



HILYARD AND 

TEMPLE RE-ELECTED 

[W« More Class Presidents Chosen 
tu Hold Office for Another Term. 



The |,rc>idents of both the upper 
namely, John B. Temple of 
Mirlburne Falls, and Joseph R. Ililyard 
hi lUverly, have l>een re-elected to H rve 
.luring the present term. The officer-, of 
the class of 1926, besides President 
Temple are: vice-president, C.eorge H. 
Thurlow of West Newbury; secretary, 
Marian S. Cassidy of Wellcsley; treasurer, 
Frederic A. Baker of Springfield ; sergeant- 
at arms, Royal W. Potter of Providence. 

The junior class officers for this term 
IN m follows: president, Joseph R. 
Hilyard of Beverly; vice-president, Ray- 
mond G. C.riffin of Southwick; secretary, 
Klla M. Buckler of Pittsfield; treasurer, 
Lawrence H. Barney of Pittsfield; ser- 
vant it arms, Albert F. Spelman of New 
London. Conn.; captain, W. Gerald 
fatten) of South Deerfield. 



Poster Exhibition 

At M IT Building 

Collection of British Railway Posters 
Forms Artistic Display. 



If you haven't a touch of wanderlust, 
don't no to see the collection of British 
Kailway posters now on exhibition in the 
(Continued on Page 2) 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Wednesday— 

rrohnian basketball. Turners Falls 

here. 
Interfraternity basketball. Theta 
( hi vs. Kappa Sigma, and Kappa 
Geanaa Phi vs. Delta Phi Alpha. 
Thursday— 
Interclass hockey. '26 vs. '27. 
Wee Club concert at Florence. 
Friday 

' I' ni. Edwin M. Whitney, reader, 
vanity basketball. New Hampshire 

hire. 

Wee Club concert at Belchertown. 
Saturday 

Varsity relay. B. C. at K. of C. 
■Wet, Boston. 
Sunday 

1 m. Chapel. Sermon by Mr. 
"wen R. Lovejoy, National Child 
Labor Committee, New York. 
Tuesday— 

'"'"fraternity basketball. Q.T.V, 
**. Kolony Klub, and Non-fra- 
ternity vs. A.T.C. 



In an address glvwJI at the afternoon 
assembly, January 20, Clifford Marie, of 
the Northampton Repertory Company, 
deplored the fact that the theater is 
gradually dying. He went on to tell 
something of the history of the theater 
as we know it. The first theater was the 
wandering band of gypsies. Out of this 
wandering band grew the bar-room actors. 
The concert hall developed, which was 
closely followed by the vaudeville. The 
latest development of this evolution is 
the cinema. From the original band of 
gypsies grew the drama. The mummers, 
of whom we read so much in English 
literature, were an early form of the 
theater. The true theater has come 
down to us in two forms, the stock com- 
pany and the repertory company. While 
the stock company seeks to star an actor, 
the repertory company has no individual 
star. Everyone works together to produce 
a play. 

Mr. Marie went on to say that in 
former times a< tors had been badly 
treated. They had very poor facilities 
to work with. Now, as the actors are 
beginning to gain a footing, the drama 
is dying. His plea is that everyone 
support the theater and not let it be 
forced out of existence. His theory for 
saving the theater from destruction is 
to have a theater in every community, 
which shall be owned ami run by the 
municipality. 



GLEE CLUB SINGS 

AT HADLEY CENTER 



Musical Organizations Start Winter 
Season. Specialty Acts Feature 

Program. 



Starting their winter season auspicious- 
ly, the M.A.C. Musical Clubs gave a very 
successful concert in the Hadley Town 
Hall last Thursday night. Many people 
in the audience considered it the l>est 
program the Aggie men have presented 
in years, although the piano, which has 
acquired a reputation in years back, was 
in worse condition than ever before. 

The program started with a group of 
college songs by the glee club, in which 
the ukelele quintet featured. Roy Nor- 
cross then gave a vocal solo, followed by 
more glee club numbers. An act by "Ted" 
Crant and "Dune" Hollingworth, assist ed 
by "Bob" Owers, was very well received. 
The orchestra, handicapped by a recent 
change in personnel, was somewhat lack- 
ing in "pep", but the act brought down 
the house when "Dutch" Ansell dropped 
his baton and did some fancy dancing. 
The final glee club number was executed 
in almost perfect form. Following the 
concert program, the hall was cleared of 
chairs, and the orchestra played for 
dancing until 11.30. 

The concert was given under the aus- 
pices of the senior class of Hopkins Acade- 
my. Luther B. Arrington '24 was the 
faculty representative on the trip. "Arry" 
was a valuable member of the glee club 
for four years. Following is the program 
given : 
College Songs 

Glee Club 
Vocal Solo 

Roy Norcross '20 
Soldiers' Chorus 
I Cannot Eat But Little Meat 

Glee Club 
I'- Phoney Duet 

Grant and Hollingworth 
Ward the Pirate R. Vaughn Williams 

Cossack Lament Kurt Schindler 

(dee Club 
Dance 

H. K. Ansell '29 and Orchestra 

Swansea Town Guslav Hoist 

(Continued on Page 2) 



Gounod 

Shaw 



Major N. Butler Briscoe, Cavalry, 
(D.O.L.), C.S.A., arrived on the campus 
last Wednesday, January 20, and has 
taken command of this unit of Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps. At the time ot 
his appointment to this |M>st last spring 
Major Briscoe, serving as a member of 
the General Staff, was engaged in a tour 
of foreign service with headquarters in 
the Philippines. He was relieved of his 
|k>M and returned to the Cnitcd States 
last October. Before taking up his duties 
here he was granted a two months' leave 
of absence. During the fall term Captain 
Daniel J .Keane, Cav. (D.O.L.), U.S.A., 
was in active charge of this |>ost prior to 
the arrival of Major Briscoe. 

Major Briscoe plans to organize a |>olo 
team in the cavalry unit here in addition 
to the regular instruction in horseman- 
ship. He is an experienced rider as well 
as an expert polo player, having served 
as captain of the polo team at Fort Mc- 
Kinley, his headquarters while in the 
Philippines. 

Major Briscoe is a graduate of the 
Cavalry School at Fort Riley, Kansas, 
and of the Command and General Staff 
at Fort Leavenworth. He was detailed 
to the General Staff in June 1923 and 
ordered to service in the Philippines. 



PROM SEASON 

TO BE REARRANGED 



Prom Show Will Come on Thursday. 
Tea Dance Planned for Saturday. 



Ilit 1027 Junior Prom will commence 
with the Prom Show which will be given 
on Thursday evening, April 16, and will 
l>e followed by the various fraternity 
house dances. The Prom Dame will be 
held the following evening, Friday, April 
Hi, at the Memorial Building. A Tea 
Dance on Saturday afternoon will replace 
the former Cabaret as tin- closing feature 
of the Prom season. Several novelties 
will characterize the Tea Dance and the 
committee is planning to make this new 
feature lively and interesting. This pro- 
gram has been decided upon as the result 
of a conference between the class Prom 
committee and Dean Machmer and has 
met with the approval of President Lewis. 
The changes in the program were made 
because it seemed more logical to have 
the features come in the order decided 
upon rather than follow the procedure as 
in past years. With the program as 
arranged in previous years the Prom girls 
found it difficult to arrive and dress on 
Thursday in time for the Prom Dance. 

The committee is busy arranging the 
details of the biggest social event of the 
year, and the class is eagerly waiting for 
the Prom season to arrive. Several bids 
have already been received from some of 
the best college orchestras and it is cer- 
tain that the music will be the very best. 



Bishop Hughes Speaks 

At Sunday Chapel 

Urges Us to Work Toward Ideals of 
Our Teachers. 



"But let him that is taught in the 
word communicate unto him that teach- 
eth in all good things," was the text of 
Bishop Edwin H. Hughes in his sermon 
at Chapel, Sunday, January 24. While 
this text may seem contradictory to life, 
yet it was clearly shown by Mr. Hughes 
that the text is true. We who are taught 
shall some day approach the ideals shown 
to us by our teachers. In working toward 
those ideals we shall amply repay the 
teacher from whom we receive the in- 
spiration to go forward. Religion has the 
same bearing on the teacher and the 
pupil as any other subject. 

One-fifth of our lives is spent in the 
presence of our teachers. If we go through 
(ollege and take up graduate work, we 
s;>end nearly one-third of our lives learn- 
ing from others. Little do we realize the 
enormous amount of time spent with 
our teachers. Little do we appreciate the 
benefits of the public school system. 
Many of us do not stop to think that 
people twenty-five years older than we are, 
(Continued on Page 2) 



j*J 

±2 



No. 14 



Unbeaten Agrarians 

Defeat Clark,/f 9-25 

Worcester Team Leads in First Half but is Out scored in the 
Second Period. Temple's Aggressiveness Aids Materially 



DEBATING TEAM HAS 
HARD ROAD AHEAD 



Six Debates Arranged, Two of Which 
will he Held Here. Two teams to 
be Organized. 



A scries of six debates for the varsity 
debating team has been arranged by 
Raymond E. Smith, manager of the 
debating society. The debates already 
planned are with the University of Maine, 
Univ. of Vermont, Middlebury, Colby, 
Bates, and Kansas State College of Agri- 
culture. Colby and Kansas State College 
are the only home debates of the season. 

The first debates of the season will lie 
held with the University of Maine at 
Orono, February 25. The subject will be, 
"Resolved, that Congress should pass 
uniform federal marriage and divorce 
laws." The second dabate, on the same 
question, will be with Colby at Water- 
ville, Maine, February 2(i. 

The first home deliate has been arranged 
with Bates College on lebruary 27. The 
question will l>e, "Resolved, that the 
United States should enter the World 
Court under the Harding-Hughes njHI 
vation." M.A.C. will take the allirma- 
tive side of the question. 

A trip has ,iIm> been planned the first 
part of March which will include Middle- 
bury t ollege at Middlebury, and the 
University of Vermont at Burlington. 
The question in debate will be, "Resolved, 
that all anthracite coal mines in the 
United States should be owned by the 

Federal Govonussoat," The negative of 

l>oth debates are to bt taken by the 
M.A.C. team. 

The sixth debate will Im- with the 
Kansas State (ollege of Agriculture and 
will Ik- held here sometime the first part 
of March. The question lias not yet been 
definitely derided HBO*. 

Because of the hard schedule which has 
been arranged it will bt necessary to form 
two teams to represent the college. The 
list of those eligible has already been 
made out and the teams for the various 
debates will soon lie chosen. 



Mild Weather Puts 

Ban on Hockey 



Three Games Cancelled. 
Scheduled for Tuesday. 



Amherst 



The hockey squad has had a lengthy, 
enforced vacation due to the mild weather 
which prevailed last week. Not only was 
the team unable to practice after the 
R.P.I, game on January 10 until last 
Monday, but they also missed two trips 
abroad which would have included three 
desirable contests, with Dartmouth, New 
Hampshire, and Bates. It is unlikely that 
these tilts will lie played off this winter. 

If the weather is favorable Tuesday, the 
sextet will probably go into action against 
Amherst. The Amherst student body 
recently reconsidered a previous vote to 
abolish hockey and have reinstated it as 
a recognized sport. "Km" Crayson, well 
known alumnus of Aggie, is coaching the 
Amherst skaters. 



Arms Five Squelched 

By Two Aggie Teams 

Frosh Victorious 62 to 14 and Two 
Years Win 40 to 15. 



The freshmen took I fast game from 
Arms Aca d emy last Saturday afternoon 
in the Drill Hall. The frosh easily out 
played their op|>onents and were on the 
offense most of the time. Webber was 
high scorer and Tompkins played a fast 
game. 

Kratt played furiously for Arms Acad- 
emy. 

The freshmen are meeting the strong 
Turners I alls tram in the Drill Hall at 
7 p. m. tonight. 

"Red" Ball's Two Year quintet also 

met with little opposition at Shefburne 

Continued on Page 3) 



The A|jgs* i|iiintet added another vic- 
tory to their unmarred list last Saturday 
night when they deleated the Cl.uk live 
at Worcester, M to U, although the team 
was not up to its usual form thereby 
making the toutest undecided until the 
end. The Agates' organization suffered a 
serious relapse and only for the hard work 
of all the individuals representing the 
Maioon and White and the fusilade of 
shots by Temple the outromr might have 
been diltrrrnt. The Clark (ram had that 
mysterious quality known as luck con- 
stantly working for them ,aml although 
they had moments when a series of shots 
would go bad most of the game was 
marked by the fact that the Worcester 
boys irtade everything count. The game 
was fast throughout, featuring inter- 
ception of passes, clever floor work, and 
hopeless offensive drive. The Aggie five 
man defense was at a disadvantage be- 
cause the large floor necessitated spread- 
ing out more than usual. Captain Sachs 
of Clark capitalized this advantage ami 
p.issed f.,st and furiously to the forwards 
who were running around through the 
visitors. 

The Clark right forward was the first 
to score when he receiver I a pass under 
the goal with no one covering him. Smiley 
tallied first for the Agates with a free try 
and Temple brought the wore up two 
more |>oints from under the basket. Two 
foul shots apirrr in. id. ■ the ( (Mint "i to 4, 

K.ingisi).! reg is t e red with a long shot and 
Shanahan tossed two more Moor boffcato 

OVei the heads of the M.A.C. drlrnsr, 
taking the lead which was not lost until 
the end of the period. The entire Aggie 
tram hammered the Cl.uk b.n klxi.inl 
without result, the only Aggie rount 
CORttag when Smiley made good another 
free try. Amsden tossed in a lucky angle 
shot thus ending the Clark scoring lor the 
period. With the count IJ to (1 against 
them, the Agates opened up a drive which 
(Continued on Pas)* 4) 



VETERAN N. H. FIVE 

TO OPPOSE AGGIES 



Difficult Assignment for Aggie Hoop- 
sters Next Friday. 



The next ap|K>arance of the M.A.C. 
quintet will be Friday night when they 
meet the New Hampshire hoopmrn in 
the Drill Hall. The Aggie trim is goin^ 
through a period filled with many colds 
and minor injuries but the chances are 
that these will DO nearly all remedied 
befoft Friday. They will need their full 
strength against the New Hampshire 
team lor New Hampshire, although they 
hove not had a rhance to show themselves 
but twice have proved that they have 
power. Twenty-seven men rerx.rtcd this 
fall im -hiding six letter men and at least 
tWO others who have seen service in 
varsity games. 

They d ef e ate d the University of Maine 
five 2'.* to I .'I in a close game. New 
Hampshire led by only one |>oint at the 
end of the half. The lineup against Maine 
included, Captain Cotton and Craig, for- 
wards, Taylor, center, and Nicora and 
Davis, guards. Davis and Craig together 
netted four goals in succession at the 
In-ginning of the second period by clever 
and fast passing. Among the substitutes 
are Kelsea, a back and the sixth letter 
man, Tetzlaff, forward, a veteran of two 
seasons, Smith, (enter, who played several 
times last year, Slayton, forward, captain 
of the frosh team last year, and Bridge, 
another member of the l'.»2X squad. 

With such a wealth of material Coach 
Cowetl should bring down a team that 
will make the Agates show their Ixst 
basketball if they would come out on top. 



OPPONKNTS' SCORKS 

Colgate 2"), Brown 24 
Springfield 29, Tufts 27 
Amherst 33, Williams 29 
Holy Cross 34, Lowell Textile L'.'i 
N.ll. 29, Univ. of Maine 13 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 27, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 27. 1926 









TIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Africultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Editor-in-Chief 
Managing Editor 



Mast T. Boyd '26 
Jqiw F. Lambert '26 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 



Editorial 
Cider Press 

Athletics 



Csmpus News 



Co-Ed News 

Alumni 
Fsculty News 



Mary T. Boyd '26 

Mary T. Boyd '26 

William L. Dole "27 

Harold L Clark '28 

L. Rockwell Smith. Jr. W 

Ernest L. Spencer '28 

Ellsworth Barnard "28 

Kuward 11. Nichols. '29 

William R. Phinney. '29 

Frances C. Bruce '27 

Josephine Panzica '28 

W. Gordon Hunter '29 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

ALT.* G. Stevens '26 Butlne- Manager 

Char. M P. Reel '26 Advertising Manager 

L.W.S H. Whitaker '27 Circulation Manager 

John E. White '27 

Douglas W. Loung 28 

Charles F. Clagg '27 

Edwin A. Wilder '28 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Sing e 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
bribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Fntered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Po« Xc d e M Accepted (or mailing "-P^ '£ 
of postage provided for in sect.on 1108. Act ot Uc 
tobeT 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



Academic Sweaters 

An editorial, fctiurully >|»takinu. is an 
expression of a personal o|.inion, IMC- 

timed by a majority of the editorial 

board. This is not. It is tin- COOClUBOH 
arrived at by a certain discussion group 
and offered as an interesting ami certainly 
original solution of an Important cunptM 
problem. The problem is: how can the 
student body be brought to recognize 
that academics are as important as 
athletics? How can you get as many 
men out for a publication as for a team? 
Of course the answer at present is that 
you can not. It is not a good answer. 

Human nature being what it is, the 
outward signs of merit count for a great 
deal bur being on a team, you are 
awarded a sweater, largely lettered. 
Everyone seeing it knows what it is, and 
why you have it. Also, the sweaters are 
warm', and very useful to the student who 
is self -supporting. The successful Acade- 
mician on the other hand, gets— a medal. 
An attractive medal, and one he is proud 
to wear. Hut what a glaring disparity! 
The medal, like Miles Standish, does not 
speak for itself. You have to explain 
medals, what they are for ami why you 
have one. And they are not, to any- 
large degree, warming, except to your 
pride, and that goes only a little way on 

a cold day. 

Sweaters are s.lf-explanatory ; they 
stand as a visible reward for honorable 
service rendered. Yes, but is not academic 
service just as honorable, just as hard, 
just as time consuming? Why the dis- 
tinction then? Why not sweaters for 
Academic men too? Academics men 
work as hard, they feel the cold as much, 
and they like public recognition of ser- 
vice just as much, as any athlete. Then 



These are the words of Prof. J. W. I -inn, 
professor of English Literature at Chicago 
University, but at least the scientists 
will second I'rof. Linn's statement. First 
ol all, the academic side is not left out, 
the eligibility rules arc a positive check 
on that end. Since this question has 
arisen the authorities have seen fit to 
publish some of the scholastic achieve- 
ments of athletes and figures show that 
as large a |M-rcentage of athletes as of 
non-athletes have received honors in the 
scholastic field and that the scholastic 
average of athletes is at least as high. 
Moreover, athletic training sties->es fair- 
mindedness. If a pen-on does not In-tter 
himself by being exposed to this influence 
why is he any worse than one of tin- 
many who are exposed to book knowledge 
ami opportunities to think without de- 
riving the full benefit from such an ex- 
perience. In order to test the value of 
athletics let us ask one question. Is the 
man who has never played the games 
but who has diligently pursued the arts 
ami sciences U-tter qualified to disting- 
uish truth from falsehood than the man 
who, in addition to having mastered the 
arts and sciences, has learned to respect 
the rights of others, to believe in fair 
play, and to base his conclusions on 
facts? All these additional |ioints are 
what athletics aims to teach and if this 
purpose is accomplished in any degree we 
think the answer is obvious. 

However the training of the mind in- 
cludes the development of inrsonality. 
Take lor example the question of publicity 
for the athlete. Dr. Clarence C. Little, 
president of the University of Michigan, 
says, " The publicity of athletic success 
is the acid test for youth,— the weak 
dissolve, the strong remain." This is a 
terse, epigrammatic statement of one of 
the greatest benefits that may be derived 
from athletics. Elton E. Weiinan, assis- 
tant director of athletics at the Cniver- 
>itv of Michigan, calls football the 
laboratory for life. He draws a remark- 
able picture. "When a boy engages in 
an athletic contest he sees his plans 
MOMed and he sees them fail. He puts 
into use his every resource in an effort 
to gain his goal. His plteM are thwarted 
time and time again. < .reat obstacles 
are thrown in his way. He is checked in 
his plans, held up, thrown back; and 
then, perhaps, through ability and per- 
severance and courage and faith he battles 
on finally to overcome the Obstacles and 
gain the goal. Here are examples of most 
of our human ex|x-riences crowded into 
a few minutes of strenuous activity. 
Where, may I ask, can you find a truer 
picture of life?" Earlier in his article he 
savs, "Where will you get a laboratory 
training in life such as sport can give? 
You can preach the code to these boys in 
the lecture room, in the class-room, in 
the churches, but you know and 1 know 
that l>eing told what to do or how to do 
it is not the same thing as going out and 
taking off your coat and rolling up your 
sleeves and trying to do it." 

Many will not admit that colleges 
should lie expected to train leaders but 
if they can do it at least in part they 
should be given credit. Prof. Linn says 
also that "the only way we shall ever 
achieve our hopes for this country is by 
the development of real leaders . . . real 
leaders are rare. They can come only 
from among the group which is determ- 
ined to find the truth if the truth is find- 




AT THE ABBEY 



—academic sweaters! They need not 

necessarily be lettered, although there is ao | e and who are equipped for the search 

a.._U ■ - *- -" 1> lie .... a .1 ■ .• t ... .1 A— __ ill..., 



Winter Meditation 

(Thanking W. A. L.) 
If Spring comes round again 

We'll walk firm roadways, 
And there'll be grass again 

And trees with leaves; 
And sunshine, warm and drowsy, 

And gay crocus — 
If Spring comes round again 

There'll be all these. 

The last gray drift will vanish 

From the roadside, 
And ice will melt; there'll lie 

No slush, no snow, 
And winds will cease their shrieking 

And sing softly — 
If Spring comes round again, — 
But I don't know! 

CP 

For "Sporty" Snow— 
We never suspected that the Weather 
Man read the Cider Press, but our little 
plea for a little snow was certainly 
promptly answered. Or perhaps the 
suggested trade was made— six rainy- 
spring days for three immediately snowy 
ones? Anyway a little snow came, but 
it wasn't the sort of "sporty" snow we 
need. It didn't stay still long enough to 
he coasted on, and as for skiing — it was 
perfection for the inept only. All you had 
to do was to slip your skiis on and stand 
still, and let the snow go rushing away 
from underfoot. 

The Athletic and Physics Departments 
should get together on this — a wonderful 
op|>ort unity to provide wholesome men- 
tal and physical exercise at one and the 
same time: the Athletic office to supply 
the skiis and the Physics Department 
formulas for calculating the rate of the 
rushing snow. 

Might we suggest that the above- 
mentioned trade of days he carried out 
a little further, and some moderately 
permanent snow secured:* 

CP 

Hey, hey ! 
Scene: a laboratory, with long tables, 
several students, and a number of little 
glass bottles containing specimens of 
various lawn carpetings. (Crass, then, if 
you won't be agricultural with us.) 

A Student (holding up a bottle) — Does 
this belong to the Oraminae family? 

Not So Studious— No, the Grounds 
Department. 

CP 

Look What's Coming 
(From an Associated Press item) 
San Francisco, Dec. 19.— Mute evidence 
that women are not only holding their 
own but are forcing man to lose his 
identity was on the register of the St. 
Francisco hotel today. 

"Mrs. George A. Bartlett and hus- 
band," was the registration, meaning 
that Mrs. Bartlett was a visitor in the 
city and was accompanied by her hus- 
band, District Judge George A. Bartlett, 
of Reno, Nevada. 

All questions regarding the unusual 
registration were referred to Mrs. Bart- 
lett who said : 

"It's merely one of the wifely privileges 
of a 50-50 marriage." 

CP 



Last Wednesday, after Assembly, tea 
was served in the Abbey Center. The 
tea is a new departure in Abbey events, 
but by its success bids fair to be a fre- 
quent one. 

M 

Under the auspices of Delta Phi, a 
bridge party was held in the Abbey 
Center, on Saturday afternoon. Pri/.t-s 
were won by Marion Cassidy, Elisabeth 
Steinbugler, and Lois Bliss. 
M 

On Sunday afternoon, Mrs. Marsh was 
"at home" at the Women's Club in town, 
having as guests the senior and sophomore 

girls. 

M 

Prelims are out for the Delta Phi 
Gamma formal dance which will be held 
in Memorial Hall on Friday, February 19. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



At a meeting of the Massachusetts 
Tree Wardens' and Foresters' Association 
held at the Horticultural Hall, Boitoi 
January 20 and 21, Everett P. Mudgt H; 
was re-elected President, and Oliver <, 
Pratt '18 was re-elected secretary i 
surer. It so happened that R. M. Gibta, 
Jesse Carpenter and A. W. Dodge, . 
the class of 1912 took part and each pre- 
sented an excellent paper. 

ex-'24 D. O. Fish has moved frost 
Miami, Florida, to Charlotte, N < 
where he is taking up work, mainly i n 
golf course construction, with E 5, 
Draper, Landscape Architect, 1915. 

•'22 Philip H. Haskins has left the 
employ of E. S. Draper '15, at Charlotte, 
N. (*., and has been elected presides 
and general manager of the Hotel Realty 
Corporation in Western North Carolina, 
which company has a considerable ana 
of land just opening for development. 



The following letter, by one of the 
alumni of our college, appeared in a 
recent issue of the Boston Herald. 

"Sometimes our fellow students at the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College think 
the alumni are not so interested in the 
college as they should be. A line in the 
Herald the other morning called to mind 
the intense loyalty of the student body 
to the title "Massachusetts". Not that 
we are unmindful of our debt to the dear 
old town of Amherst, or have forgotten 
that our college is the daughter of Amherst 
College. 

The longer we are absent the more we 
prize the name— Amherst Aggie— it's the 
history of the early days of our college 
after the manner of Thucydides. We do, 
however, — students and alumni — like to 
see her bear her official title, Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, in the public 
press. 

(Signed) Newton Shultis. 



GLEE CLUB SINGS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Song of the Jolly Roger 

C. F. Chudleigh Candish 

Clee Club 
Songs of Old Massachusetts 
Combined Clubs 
The following men made the trip with 
the glee club: first tenors — H. F. Hart 
lett '2(5, H. Harris "27, J. F. Lambert 96, 
E. S. Loud '26; second tenors— H. Baum- 
gartner '28, D. H. Campbell '27, W. A. 
Day '29, P. Isham '28, R. Owers '28, C. 
Parsons '27, R. Spooner '26, F. Stratton 
'28; first basses— F. D. Alberti '29, W. 
A. Estes '27, G. B. Flint '29, M. C. 
Fonseca '29, T. Mills '29, E. C. Richard- 
son '29, P. N. Dow '26; second basses— 
J. E. Burnham '26, T. J. Grant '26, D. 
W. Hollingworth '26, D. Lane '28, O. 
Richter *27, A. R. Chamberlain '27. The 
orchestra was composed of L. R. Smith 
'28, G. G. Canney '29, D. Loring '28, J. 
E. White '27 and T. A. Farwell *27. 

On Thursday and Friday of this week 
the clubs will go to Florence and Belcher- 
town. The remainder of the schedule has 
not been completed as yet. 



EXPERIMENT STATION 

Mr. Robert J. McFall, extension tpeoal. 
ist in Co-operation and Marketing, i- og 
leave of absence until next July. He a 
pursuing special work with the Institute 
of Economics. For the present In- i s 
located in Washington. 

M 

Director Sidney B. Haskell of iht 
Experiment Station has recently ban 
elected assistant secretary of the Aaaocia. 
tion of Land Grant Colleges. This .* 
tion includes agricultural colleges, expert- 
ment stations, and the extension ■erviea 
of all the states; and in many cases tiki-, 
in also the state universities. For many 
years Dr. J. L. Hills, M.A.C. '81, hai ben 
the secretary of the organization. It i-, 
as Dean Hills' assistant in the work ot 
this association, that Mr. Haskell ha> 
been ap|>ointed. 

M 

Mr. Arthur I. Bourne and Mr. Williaa 
L. Doran, b >th assistant research pro 
lessors on the Experiment Station -tail 
spoke at a meeting of the tiampda 
County Fruit Growers Association held 
January 20 in the New Hampden (Hum'. 
Improvement League Building on th 
Exposition grounds in West Springfid I 
Mr. Bourne spoke on orchard insect-, tad 
Mr. Doran spoke on fruit diseases. 

M 

The Experiment Station has recently 



no reason except a stupid convention why 
they should not be. Still, just to differ- 
entiate the classes of service, academics 
sweaters might well bear distinctive de- 
vices for the various organizations in- 
cluded. 

This, you understand, is merely a 
suggestion. We should like some com- 
(Continued on column five) 



More on Overemphasis 

Several weeks ago the COLLEGIAN 
quoted the "New Student" concerning 
the Wesleyan Parley. It will be remem- 
bered that this conference agreed that 
football was heing overemphasized in 
Americas colleges today. First of all we 
cannot see bow students assume that the 
editors of college papers and one repre 
tentative of the student government of 
each college are representative of the 
student opinion in the various colleges 
sending delegates. 

The Parldy took the liberty to assume 
that the purpose of the American college 
is "primarily the training of the mind." 
We believe that the purpose is broader 
but nevertheless we shall concede them 
this statement. The idea of many is 
that training the mind means "stimulat- 
ing young men and women to determine 
the truth for themselves and the develop- 
ment of minds equipped for this effort." 



The Alhletic Journal comments as follows: 
"It would be interesting to know if any 
or many of the world's leaders have been 
men who, in addition to their ability to 
determine facts, to think honestly and 
courageously, and to carry out their 
beliefs determinedly lacked character, 
personality, and other human qualities 
which are stressed in athletic training. . . 
The athletic men believe that in addition 
to intellectual greatness it is the function 
of the college to stress also these qualities 
of character, which are, according to the 
beliefs of the athletic men, necessary 
attributes of leadership." 

How can the world say that athletics 
is overemphasized when it deserves to 
much emphasis and when it openly de- 
clares th.it it is a supplement to the 
scholastic side of the college curriculum 
and not a substitute? Moreover, the 
facts indicate that this declaration is 
more than an idle remark made in in- 
Uftcerity. Evefl the "ringer" must study. 
In some cases he is squeezed through in 
some mysterious way but life is filled 
with grafters why is a ringer used against 
athletics. Why shouldn't a man with a 
"smooth line" who passes his courses by 
means of this talent Ik- used as an argu- 
ment against a college education, many 
people envv him and covet his "ability." 

W . L. D. 



These Assemblies 

Congratulations to the Powers-That- 
Be. Our last two Assemblies have been 
highly enjoyable — good speakers, with 
good speeches well spoken. The quality 
of attention is not strained — in such 
instances. We do think, however, that 
speakers make a great mistake in con- 
stantly reiterating, "But I must not bore 
you with this" and the like. The human 
mind is so peculiarly open to suggestion 
— and three remarks al>out possible bore- 
dom may very possibly engender boredom 
itself. Also, after a several minute in- 
sistence on the impromptu, the spontane- 
ous, and the utterly unprepared nature 
of a coming speech— you know, the "I 
don't know myself what I am going to 
talk about" sort of thing— it does not 
look well to consult, and obviously follow, 
an already prepared outline. 

Spontaneity is a most desirable thing, 
but we can't help wondering if, having 
been asked to address an audience, if 
this "unprepared" idea, with its implica- 
tion of not caring enough about the 
matter to spend time even in considera- 
tion, is not somewhat of an insult to the 
audience. 

What? Oh sure, it's always a good 
"line". That's probably why they do it. 

CP 

And that's that! 



POSTER EXHIBITION 

(Continued from Pag* 1) 

Memorial Building. They will mean no 
more to you than our own advertisements 
of "Gorton's Codfish— No Bones". But 
if there is any fascination for you in 
storied places, and if you have ever had 
any desire to "go down to the sea in 
ships", don't miss the exhibition. It is 
for you. 

The posters, originally ordered by 
British railway companies with a view to 
stimulating a desire to travel on the part 
of the public, depict at once romance and 
reality. Being posters, the massing and 
coloring is necessarily more "splashy" 
than is usual, but the posters are true 
works of art, being by noted artists, 
members for the most part of the Royal 
Academy. • 

Perhaps the most effective poster of all 
is that showing a ship ploughing bravely 
through a blue summer sea— "To Ireland". 
Then there is the more subtle beauty of 
"Kent", with its delicate hop leaf tracer- 
ies; and the bold coloring and rich ro- 
manticism of "Carlisle". "The Open 
Road" leads straight into the heart of 
old England— the England typified by 
mysterious Stonehenge, here depicted in 
all its stark majesty against a dawn sky. 
These posters are worth seeing in that 
they open a new field to advertising 
artists, carrying the appeal of good art to 
the new strata of society whose apprecia- 
tion will react upon both the artists and 
the advertisers. 



secured an eectrometric apparatus for 
the determination of the hydrogen ion 
concentration in soil solutions. Mr. 
Lewell S. Walker, assistant official < hen, 
ist, of the Control Service Staff, i- ■ 
gaged in determining the hydrogen ion 
concentration of soils, in connection with 
tobacco experiments which are being 
carried on at the Experiment Station 
grounds. He has some eighty samples of 
soil under investigation. 

M 

There has recently been issued by the 
Experiment Station an article entitled, 
"The Value of Calcium Phosphate as a 
Supplement to the Rations of Dairy 
Cows." This work covers a period of 
two and one half years, and has been 
; published in the Journal of Agricultural 
Research. 

There are now in press articles entitled, 
"The Digestibility and Energy Values of 
Foods for Horses," and "Hv.lrolized 
Sawdust as a Cattle Feed." 



ACADEMIC SWEATERS 
(Continued from column one) 

munications on the subject. Alumni— 
you old editors and athletes— what * 
you think of it? Publications, you ■* 
realize are a vital part of campus m 
Already one publication has failed he- 
cause of lack of support. If W 
would help— let us by all means have 
sweaters! 



BISHOP HUGHES SPEAKS 

(Continued from Page I > 
know more than we do. Those people have 
gone through much the same exp 
we have and arc in a position to *«* 
us. There is an antagonism betwe*" ' 
pupil and the teacher which should * 
exist. 

While we are here in college vu bx* 
great deal of freedom. We have to m 



contf 5 

It 



on our own judgment when a tinu- 
to decide between right and vu 
we use that freedom for the flesh •■ 
be damned. If we use that frcolomj 
our spiritual lives, we shall be 
Mr. Hughes put particular stre- » n fc 
fact that we alone are responsible b» 
way in which we live here at 
While our teachers will do anvil 
us, there are many things which we 
have to decide for and do oursel 



Hickey-Freeman 

Customized Clothes 



Among clothing men, in retail clothing re- 
stores, and among makers of clothing, -- =1 
you often hear the claim, As good as 
HICKEY-FREEMAN. This phrase speaks 
volumes for the original, genuine article. 




The Beet in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



97k*H L+«cdL 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 



IS AT 



DRURY'S 

College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



NORTHAMPTON 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

Paul Hansell, Mgr. 
WEEK OF JAN. 25 

The Northampton Repertory Company 

—IN— 

"CANDIDA" 

By BERNARD SHAW 

Week of Feb. 1 
" LOYALTIES M 

By John (ialsworthy 

Evenings at 8.15 Sat. Mat. at 2.15 

Prices: 50c. to SI. 10. (including tax) 

Phone 435 



If you believe in this sort of theatre, 
Support It 



TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 3258 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



ARMS FIVE SQUELCHED 
(Continued from Page 1) 

Falls on January lit and easily COOquired 
the Arms AeaoVmy hoopstcrs l>\ a ■core 
of 40 to 15. Holland, lift forward on the 
shorthorn team was thr outstanding st,n 

of the evening, collecting 10 double- 
decken and four foul shots fa a total of 
M |M)ints Purrinfton was the chief 

si our for the Arms live. 
Summaries: 



M.A.C. '29 


B.F.P. 


Arms Acad. 


B.F.P. 


Webber .if 


ia qm 


Woods, in 


2 2 


Kelley.rf 





Kit-d.lg 





("oukos.c 


4 8 


Kratt.c 





koh'tson.rg 


8 012 


l'tir'^ton.lf 


1 2 4 


Cox.lg 


1 I 


IVrkins.rf 


2 4 


Tompkins, rf 


6 oio 


Tagermarelli 


10 4 


lost er.ru 


2 4 






Regan, rf 










Totals 81 002 Totals .'> 414 

Sean — M.A.C. Freatunen 88, Arms 

Academy 14. Referee— Nash. Timer — 

Kuan. Two 20-minutc periods. 




M.A.C. Two Year 
BJP.P. 

Holland.rf 10 421 
Massa.rf 2 4 

Tefft.rf 1 2 

l.eoncini.rf 
Uv.m.c 5 010 

\ 'iale.rg 8 

Burrill.rg 8 
Parsons, In 8 8 <> 



Arms Academy 

11.1.1'. 
Woods, rg 1 2 4 

lloyt.ln 

ReedMg 8 <> 6 

Kiatt.c 8 1 1 

l'urrinnton.lf .'{ 2 H 

Tan'mar'li.lf 

IVrkins.rf 1 2 



Totals IS 440 
Keferet — Sauter. 



Totals 



o 61 fi 



INTERFRATERNITY 
BASKETBALL 
Four Intcrfraternity basketball 

were played last week of whi< 

following are the semes: 

I'hi Si^ma Kappa 1">, Theta (hi 
A.T.«. «.». Delta I'hi Alpha :i 
Q.T.V. 17, Kappa Si^ma 8 
Sigma I'hi Kpsilon 98, Non Irat 
Interfraternity Standing 
l'lti\rd Won I. <ist 

A. (.. R. 

I.. C A. 

K. E, 

1'. S. K. 

s. P. E. 

(J. T. V. 

K. <;. P. 

A. S. P. 

A. T. < i. 

K. S. 

T. C. 

D. P. A. 

K. K. 

N. F. 



2 


2 





2 


2 





2 


2 





:i 


2 


1 


:i 


2 


1 


2 


I 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


:f 


1 


2 


■i 


1 


2 


2 





2 


l 





1 


3 





1 



^allies 
h the 

8 



IS 
P. ( . 

1 ,008 

I (MX) 
I 000 

twit; 

•88 
.806 
.086 

068 

500 

an 

80S 

.000 

(too 

INK) 



The members of Prof. Rand's classes 
in hnglish 29 attended a lecture at the 
Jones Library, delivered by Mr. Clifton 
Johnson, under the auspices of the 
Amherst Historical Society on Tuesday 
evening, January 19. The subject of the 
lecture was "Oldtown Chronicles," which 
consisted of stories and reminiscences of 
the speaker's boyhood in Hadley, which 
he called "Oldtown.". 

The four year old son of Professor John 
(;. Archibald, assistant research professor 
of Chemistry, diet! January 20 as the 
result of an operation. 



NEW HANDY PACK 

Fits hand ** 
pocket and purse 

Mora for your money 
and tba best Peppermint 
Chewing Sweet for any money 

Lock for Wrigley's P. K. Handy Pack 
$} on your Dealer** Counter 07 fc 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUNSINGWEAR and MEDAL1A 
SILK HOSE 

BIO ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $1.39 $1.75 

G. Edward Fisher 




Evening Slippers — 

Many Styles 
and Materials 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 



275 High St. 



Holyoke 



DEUEL'S DRUQ STORE 

All out iloors invites your Kodak -Get those picture now 
KODAKS— Sizes and prices to suit all —BROWNIES 

Eastman Films (The dependable Film) 
DEVELOPING PRINTING ENLARGING 



GOING STRONG- 

Our Pre-inventory Clearance Sale 

is still in full swing and affords you an 
opportunity to buy well tailored suits and 
overcoats especially adapted to the 
college man at very low prices . . . 

SEE US SOON 



F. M. Thompson & Son 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST & DEACON, Prop*. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



RLADY TO WEAR 



You will And an eicellant 

. . . SHOE KM'AIK I M. SHOP . . . 
equipped with the moat up-to-date Goodyear 
Machinery and a modern 
SHOE SHINING PARLOR 
at II) Amity- St.. • Lahrovltz Block 

Wt underUand your rtqutrrment* and art pre- 
pared to meet your needs. 
All work Kuarantrrd Sh>,e% shined and dyed. 

VINCENT (,RAM)()M(;o, |» r op. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Wait 
NEW PRICES 

Men'* Whole Sole*. KiiMkt llwli - - . $2.55 
Men'a Half Sole*. KiiIiImt IIiyU • - - |,75 
Men'i Kiiblf-r Solm, Rubber Heels - . 2.25 
Men's Half Soles | || 

Work <,uar.inteed— AMHKRST HOUSE 
Open tills I*. M. 



FREE 

CRA,NK CASE 

SERVICE for 

FOUNTAIN PENS 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

(SUPPLY LIMITED) 

The New College Store 



M BUILDING 



SPECIAL THINGS 

for 
Special Students 



SING LEE "AND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherat, Mass 

Our i.aundry First Claaa 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING ANI> AM. KINDS OF 
WASHING HONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite Poet Office 



BLOW YE WINDS HEIGH HO 

. . . tf are dothed in one of our sturdy, dependable OVERCOATS that are selling at a 

A rovmg you may go but you II not mind the w.nd ■JJJ^ AiMmint o( M per cent. 

CARL H. BOLTER 

AMHERST 



EXETER 



HYANNIS 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, JAN. 27, 1926 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thurs. 

S.M. 

7.3S 



Douglua Fairbanks and 
V1.ii v A»tor In 

DON O. SON OK ZOKRO" 
. welve reel». Willi I whip 
for a weapon Douftlwi Kalr- 
UankN give* more laughs, 
more real ihrllls. more hlfth 
speed In "Don Q" than In 
any plcturehe ha» ever made 
News Fable* Lloyd 

Hamilton Comedy 



Friday 



4.45. 8.M 



Reginald Denny In 

•CALIFORNIA STRAIGHT 
AHEAD" 
One of those Interesting 
automobile race stories. 
Spotlight Charlie Chase 

Comedy 



NOTE BOOKS PAPER STATIONERY 

ALL THE NECESSARY EQUIPMENT TO START THE NEW TERM 

EEE^EE=EEE^YE AGGIE INN = 



Saturday 

Ml 
4.45 ■ »• 



Mon. 

3.00 
4.45 8.30 



Jack Holt, Florence Vldor. 
and Raymond Nation in 
THE ENCHANTED HILL" 

Peter B. Kyne's latest best 
seller recently read by mill- 
ions In the Cosmopolitan 
magazine. A fast moving, 
rolorf til story of action. 
News Bobby Vernon Comedy 



Alice Joyce, Warner Baxter, 
Dolores Costello, Zasu Pitts 
in "MANNEQUIN" 

Fannie Hurst's $50,000.00 
prize serial In Liberty Maga- 
Ine. A James Cruze pro- 
duction. 
IFathe Review PatheComedy 



COLLEGE SHOES 

townVrices 



PAGE f S SHOE STORE 



We have just received another large 
assortment of OVERSHOES at different 
prices. Avoid being too late. 

Hosiery a Specialty 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

We can equip you with the following: 
Skis, Ski Poles, Ski Wax, Showshoes, 
Skates, Shoes, Pucks, Hockey Sticks and 
Shin Guards. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANE 



Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the best in everything 



VALENTINES 



Come and see 



them 



UNBEATEN AGRARIANS 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Draught tlm to the top again, Parten- 
heimer started the scoring with a shot 
over his heaii and another at close range, 
(lark however succeeded in intercepting 
passes frequently but their aim suffered a 
temporary relapse. Smiley tied the score 
from the foul line and Thomas took the 
tap and tore down the sideline and cut 
under the hoop for the last tally of the 

half. 

In the second period, the Aggie offense 
opened up again, with Temple shooting 
constantly. Thomas was the first to 
score and Partenliciiner added two more 
following in. Clark capitalized two foul 
shots but Thomas followed in success 
fully giving the Agates their six-point 
lead again, the score now being 20 to 14. 
(lark added two more from in front of 
the basket, followed by a long angle shot, 
and they regained the lead when Plumb 
counted from the foul line. Free shots 
brought the Aggies into the lead again 
24 to 22 but Amsden threatened this 
advantage by making another foul shot 
count. Temple however crashed through 
with five more points and the whistle 
sounded soon after Shanahan had regis- 
tered once again. 

Larry Jones' uncanny ability to get 
the tap was invaluable to the Agates and 
Temple's innumerable shots were their 
salvation. Considering that the M.A.C. 
team was playing with a handicap of 
several minor injuries no further excuses 
need l)e offered, and, in fact, the team 
should l>c given double credit for the 
fight they showed. For Clark, Amsden 
played a superior game. Anderson 
although not outstanding from a spec- 
tacular point of view, was one of the 
most effective men on the floor. 

The summary: 

Mass. ARgies Clark 

HI. P. 

4 210 Sachs.rh 
:i 1 7 Anderson, lb 
t) 1 1 Amsdcn.c 
() () Q Kangisl.a.rf 
1 2 I Plumb. rf 



(■riffin.rb Shanahan.lf •* 1 7 
Thomas.rb 3 1 7 



Totals 11 729 Totals 10 525 
Score at half time — Mass. Aggies 14, 

Clark 12. Referee— Sauter. Time— 20- 

minute halves. 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

GLUB HAS MEETING 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 



The Animal Husbandry Club held its 
most successful meeting of the year last 
Wednesday evening in Stockbridge Hall, 
with about forty persons present. Sidney 
B. Carl was elected vice-president of the 
club, and Oliver A. Whitcomb, treasurer, 
to serve during the remainder of the year. 
Following the business meeting, Mr. 
Cornell Green gave a talk on the subject 
of sheep-raising in New England. During 
his talk, he touched on the various aspects 
of sheep-raising as an industry, and de- 
scribed the method used on the Belding 
farm in Colrain, of which he is manager, 
and which has one of the finest flocks in 
the east. At the close of the meeting 
refreshments were served to all those 
present. 



Associate Alumni 
Memorial Hall 
M.A.C. Athletic Association 
Academic Activities . 
The College Senate . 
Track Association 
Baseball Association . 
Football Association . 
The Collegian 
Hockey Association . 
Basketball Association 
Roister Doisters . 
Musical Clubs 

1926 Index . 

1927 Index . 
M.A.C. Christian Association 
Public Speaking and Debating 



Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec'y 
Richard Mellen, Mgr. 
C. S. Hicks, General Mgr. 
Frank P. Rand, Mgr. 
Lawrence L. Jones, Pres. 
J. E. Greenaway, Mgr. . 
William L. Dole, Mgr. . 
Francis W. Warren, Mgr. 
Mary T. Boyd, Editor . 
Donald R. Williams, Mgr. 
Preston Davenport, Mgr. 
Philip N. Dow, Mgr. 
Harry E. Fraser, Mgr. . 
Myron Smith, Mgr. . 
Kenneth W. Milligan, Mgr. 
Roy E. Norcross, President 
Raymond Smith, Mgr. . 



Telephone 
175-J 
175-J 
403-M 

119-X 
88M 

8325 

170 

6GC-M 

547-.M 

59-M 

2M 

720 

170 

8314 

8325 

8325 

300 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



Temple, If 
P't'hcinicr.rf 
J ones, c 
Murdough.c 
Smiley, lb 



B.F.P. 

1 2 

1 Q 2 

2 3 7 
2 1 8 

1 2 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up on* flight) 

Oculist. Prescription. MM B">k*n '•«••* 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 



JAMES A. LOWELL, BOOKSELLER 

r^ertHfrosts 
autog raphed poems 

FEBRUARY 14th 
St. Valentine's Day 

We have a large assortment of 
CARDS and FAVORS - AT ALL PRICES 



When it's the night of 

the season's most festive dance— 

and Mimi, herself, has consented 

to go — when in a last moment 

before starting you thank 

your good fortune 

—have a Camel! 



Pre-Inventory Prices 

NOW PREVAIL. Save some 

money on good up-to-date 

College Shoes 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 



MAIN STREET 



AMHERST 




WHEN the night of the 
famous prom has come 
— and you contemplate 
your luck and your 
greatness — hare a 
Camel! 

For Camel adds of its 
own romance to every 
memorable event. Camels 
never tire the taste, never 
leave a cigaretty after* 
taste. When you light a 
Camel, you may know 
you are smoking the 
world's mellowest 
cigarette. 

So this night, as you 
fare boldly forth to 
society's smartest and 
gayest affair — learn then 
how sympathetic, how 
really fine and friendly a 
cigarette can be. 

Hare a Camel! 




Into the making of this one cigarette goes all of the ability 
of the world's largest organization of expert tobacco men. 
Nothing is too good for Camels. The choicest Turkish 
and Domestic tobaccos. The most skilful blending. The 
most scientific package. No other cigarette made is like 
Camels. No better cigarette can be made. Camels are the 
overwhelming choice of experienced smokers. 



01926 




Our hi gheil wish. if you io 
not yet know Camel qual- 
ity, it that you try them. 
We invite you to comport 
Camel t with any eigarellt 
made at any price. 
R. J. Reynold! Tobacco 
Company 



LAST CALL— . . 

To make room for a new Spring merchandise which is arriving now daily, we are selling all winter suits and 

overcoats on very substantial reductions 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAUU 



M h ■ . . 

FEB i ■■ 

Agricultural 



5frg jWaaflarljttagttH (ftalUgiift 



Vol. xxxvi. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEB. 3, 1926 



W :, N 15 



HOCKEY TEAM 

TIES AMHERST 



So Score in Hotly Contested Town 
Battle. Both Teams Suffer from 
Lack of Practice. 



Coach "Red" Halls M.A.C. hockey 
mm outplayed USB Amherst sextet on 
tlu Amherst rink on January 26, but 
lOt unable to win the game. The HON 
at the end of the contest, which was 
h,lted early because of the glare of arc 
light! on the ice, was to 0. Neither 
tea(n displayed any polished teamwork 
M the warm weather had prevented more 
than a day's practice in preparation for 
ttu game. The final decision as to the 
relative merits of the two opponents must 
IK |>ostponed until February 18 when 
Amherst comes to M.A.C. 

The Cameron brothers starred for 
Amherst with their clever individual 
viork, but Aggie presented a more bal- 
anced organization which managed to 
take many shots at the opposing cage. 
Captain "Buddy" Moberg featured with 
his clever skating and stickwork. Both 
goalies weathered severe assaults and 
proved adamant when a score seemed 
impending. The summary: 

Mass. Aggies Amherst 

Forrest, Iw rw, Lawson, Hamford, Evers 
Moberg (Capt.), rw lw, Patrick 

Frese, c c, M. Cameron 

Potter, Id rd, Parnall, Currier 

Abrahamson, rd Id, S. Cameron (Capt.) 
Palmer, g g. M' ll<r 

Sj-ore — Amherst 0, Mass. Aggies 0. 
Penalty — Abrahamson, 1 min. Referee — 
Doen] of M.A.C. Time of periods— three 
,,( l.'i minutes and two of 5 minutes. 



NOTICE 



There will be an Informal on 
Saturday, March 6, in the Mem- 
orial Building. Further announce- 
ments concerning it will be made 
later by the Informal Committee. 



MUSICAL CLUBS GIVE 
TWO MORE CONCERTS 



Programs Presented in Florence and 
Belchertown. Boston Trip Now 
Assured. 



Seniors Lead 

in Scholarship 

Fall Term Average for Each Member 
is 78.7 Percent. Freshmen are 
Lowest. 



Home Economics 

Vacancy Filled 

Miss Bertha Knight, Experienced 
Home Economist, Succeeds Miss 

Tucker. 



The vacancy m the Home Eco n o m i c s 
Department has been recently filled by 
the appointment of Miss Bertha Knight. 
Mi. succeeds Miss Marion L Tucker who 
resigned bom the position of assistant 
professor of home economics. 

Miss Knight attended Dakota Weslcyan 
1 Diversity, the Normal and Industrial 
School at Aberdeen, South Dakota, the 
Leva Institute of Chicago and the I ni- 
nusity of Chicago. Her experience as a 
teacher includes eight years in South 
Dakota, and three year's experience in 
home economics work in Iowa. She has 
also served the State of Maryland for 
five years as extension specialist in cloth- 
ing and home furnishings. 



Braving an unprecedented blizzard, the 
Aggie Musical Clubs journeyed to Florence 
last Thursday night, giving a concert and 
dance in Parsons Hall, while the follow- 
ing evening they performed in the new 
High School auditorium in Belchertown. 

The program presented in both places 
was practically the same as that given in 
Hadley the week before, a notable addi- 
tion to it being a piano solo by Carl 
Fraser '26. In Belchertown the clubs un- 
doubtedly attained their greatest success 
of the season. Every number was well 
presented and well received. The ever- 
changing roster of the dance orchestra, 
however, is a continual handicap to that 
organization, and a constant, definite 
membership is a thing to be striven for 
in the future. 

Both trips were made by bus, Earl 
Carpenter '24 accompanying the clubs to 
Florence, and Prof. Frank P. Rand being 
the faculty representative at Belcher- 
town. Dancing proved a strong attrac- 
tion at both places, and there were but 
few of the men who had any desire to 
come home immediately after the concert. 

The management is hard at work to 

prov i de ■ satisfactory schedule for the 

remainder ol the season. Through the 
efforts of ('.rant 'L'f>, a Boston trip is 
assured. A contract has already been 
signed for Auburndale, and it is expected 
that two more concerts will soon Im 
arranged for the taste nip. 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

SINGS IN AMHERST 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Wednesday— 

Interclass hockey. 1928 vs. 2 Yrs. 
Thursday 
Interfraternity basketball. Lambda 
Chi Alpha vs. Phi Sigma Kappa, 
Sigma Phi Epsilon vs. Kappa 
Gamma Phi. 
Interclass hockey. 1927 vs. 1929. 
Friday — 
Interfraternity basketball. Alpha 
Sigma Phi vs. Kolony Klub, 
Alpha Gamma Rho vs. Delta 
Phi Alpha. 
Interclass hockey. 1926 vs. 2 Yr. 
Saturday — 
Mid-Winter Alumni Day. 
10 a. m. Vanity hockey. Middle- 
bury, here. 

2 p. m. Interfraternity sing. Bow- 
ker Auditorium. 

4 p. m. Varsity basketball. Holy 
Croat, here. 

5 p. m. Freshman basketball. 

< -reenfield, here. 
Fraternity banquets. 

Sunday — 
9.10a.m. Chapel. Sermon by Dean 

< haries R. Brown, Yale Divinity 
v ' hool, New Haven. 

Monday — 
Interfraternity basketball. Phi 

Sigma Kappa vs. o.T.W, Kappa 
' ' tmma Phi vs. A.T.G. 
Tuesday— 
'■iris' Glee Club Concert at Cush- 
nian. 



Co-ed Organization Performs to Large 
Audience in Jones Library. 



The Girls' Glee Club gave its se< oml 
concert last Sunday afternoon, at five 
o'clock, before an audience which packed 
the music room of the Jones Library of 
Amherst to overflowing. Mrs. A. B. 
(Continued on Page 2) 

ALUMNI DAY PROGRAM 

INCLUDES MANY SPORTS 



Inter-Fraternity Sing Also to be 
Big Feature. 



There is every prospect that Mid- 
Winter Alumni Day, which is scheduled 
for next Saturday, February 6, will be 
one of the most successful ever held on 
the Aggie campus. The Interfraternity 
sing, which is an innovation designed to 
take the place of the interclass sing 
formerly held at Commencement, is ex- 
pected to be an outstanding feature of 
this year's program. Work is also being 
done on the program of games and sports, 
the most important athletic event being 
the basketball game between Holy Cross 
and the unbeaten Aggie team. 



ONE- ACT PLAY CONTEST 

TO BE DISCONTINUED 



Students Must Show More Interest, 
Roister Doisters Decide. 



The Roister Doisters have decided to 
discontinue the annual one-act play con- 
test this year. This decision is not net m 
sarily final provided enough students 
show their interest in having the contest 
continued. Those who are desirous of 
having the contest run as usual are re- 
quested to see other Professor Rand or 
Philip Dow. The reason for the discon- 
tinuance of the contest is that the Roister 
Doisters have had the feeling that the 
students, as a whole, were not entering 
the competition voluntarily but bcCSUM 
of some other reason. The Roister 
Doisters do not, therefore, wish to run 
the contest unless it is desired by the 
students themselves. 



The scholastic standings of the four 
classes for the fall term contains much 
that is of interest to the student body as 
a whole. Kxact standings have not beta) 
completed at the present time ami there- 
fore the following statistics are onlv 
approximate, but they show the number 
of students with their relative standing 
in each of the four classes. These figures 
are as follows: 

Averages '26 '27 '28 '29 

90 or above 2 3 4 2 

85-90 19 14 8 8 

80-85 21 20 12 H 

75-80 33 26 34 M 

70-75 20 19 38 47 

65-70 8 11 27 M 

60-05 1 8 15 

Below 60 10 

104 93 132 165 
The percentage of each class in the 
various groups is: 

Averages '26 '27 '28 '29 

90 1.94 3 23 3.03 1.20 

85-90 18.29 15.05 6.06 4.85 

80-85 20.15 21.51 9.09 13.94 

75-80 31.73 27.96 25.76 21.82 

70-75 19.23 20 43 28.80 28 49 

65-70 7 70 11.82 20.44 20 60 

60-65 0.96 0. 6 08 9 10 

Below 60 0. 0. 76 0. 

It is also interesting to note that the 
(lass of '26 has the greatest |>ercentage of 
its members above the grade of 70, having 
D1.34£ of its enrollment in that classifi- 
cation. The class of '27 ranks next with 
KK. 18£ and is followed by the (lasses of 
L'S and '29 in the named order with 
72.74£ and 70.302 respectively. 

The average standing of each member 
in the four (lasses is of still more interest. 
The class of '20 again ranks first with an 
average of 78.70$. The other (lasses rank 
as before with 78*331 74.(11', and 73.980 
respectively. A comparison between the 
average of the class ol '28 and class of '!".» 
is scry noteworthy. The former leads by 
a margin of .(Xi%. 



Cavalry Stable 



is Completed 



Concrete Structure is Much Superior 
to Old Building. 



The new cavalry stable, which has been 
built to replace the one which burned last 
September, is now being occupied. 'Un- 
stable is constructed of concrete blocks 
and is practically fireproof throughout. It 
was built by the college at a cost of $10,- 
oOO. The establishment consists of three 
buildings, the stable proper, a feed 
storage building, and a blacksmith shop. 

The stable is built to accommodate 
sixty-six horses. This building contains a 
saddle room, officer's saddle room, saddlers 
shop, and the office. The stalls are large, 
and well built with concrete floors. The 
aisles between the stalls are wide and are 
well layed out. The building is well 
ventilated and well lighted. 

Ample fire protection is provided. Not 
only are fire hoses supplied, but also the 
office is lined with fireproof wall board. 
The division of the stables into three 
buildings is also a protection against fire. 

The new stable is much better than the 
old one, and the opinion among the 
officers is that there is no better stable in 
the Fast. 



LANDSCAPE CLUB 

On Friday evening, February 5, at 7 
p. m., Mr Herbert Wallace Handle, 
landscape architect of Springfield, will 

■peak to the Landscape Clnb in Wilder 

Hall. His subject will be "Playground 
Design and Construction." 

Mr. Ileadlc, a graduate of the College, 
was one of the founders of the l.ands< apt 
Club. All who are interested are invited 
to attend the meeting. 



INTERCLASS HOCKEY 

At present only two games of the inter- 
daSS hockey Serial have been played. 
These are as follows: 

Jan. 12—1928 1, IM60 

Jan. 13— 1927 8, 2yr. 



Agates Score 20-13 



Over N. H 7ive 



Griffin Cages Four Floor Baskets in Fiery Fray, as Home Team 
Smashes Record of Granite Staters 



MANAGERS ASK NEW 

ELECTION SYSTEM 



Want Aspirants Selected by Com- 
mittee of Four, and Favor Junior 
Managerships. 



The present system of electing athletic 
managers at M.A.C. was declared to Im- a 
poor one by the managers at a meeting 
last Thursday afternoon. The chief diffi- 
culty occurs in the final decision which 
is at present in the hands of the student 
body. All agreed to one remedy for this 
situation, namely, that the assistant 
managers be appointed by a committee 
of four, consisting of the Graduate 
Manager, the coach, the captain, and the 
manager. In this way fraternity politics 
will be almost entirely eliminated. More- 
over, those who know most about the 
ability of the candidates will be the ones 
to pick the managers. 

The next question to be discussed was 
that all competition for managerships l>e 
unified, that all candidates enter the 
competition at a fixed time each year and 
work in all sports for a year and than 
that the five managerships U- filled from 
the candidates who survive. The group 
could come to no definite decision on this 
|M>int but they did agree on one |x>int 
that was brought up in the discussion. 
They voted unanimously to submit to 
the student forum, in addition to the new 
■ystmi Ol election, that all managerships 
except football l>c junior managerships. 
Another meeting will Im- (ailed in t lie mar 
future to try to arrive at some con- 
clusion regarding the question of ton 

solid. tied competition. 



The Mass. Aggie basket I >.dl team 
■ t o pp e d the New Hampshire five in the 
Drill Hall last Friday night 21) to l.{, in 
a heated tilt, featuring clever dcfeiw 
woik and whirlwind lloor work. The 
Agates took the lead first but the visitors 
(apt tired it when the count was 4 to .'I, 
the only part of the game in which they 
wete ahead. The New Hampshire team 
(.ime to Amherst with the reputation of 
befog a hard team to beat and they 
proved not unworthy of this name, al- 
though outscored by the Agates, whose 
team work was of high class from the first 
whistle to the final gun. 

Temple scored the first point, capital- 
izing a free try. With the advantage of 
getting the tap every time the Agates 
kept the Granite Staters on their toes 
every minute but they succeeded in tak- 
ing the sphere for themselves several 
times in the next few minutes only to 
lose it to the Goreman again. After a 
fast session of futile play Temple tried a 
long shot and Partenheimer tallied on the 
follow-in. Craig, New Hampshire's licet y 
little forward, scored from an angle. 
Temple and Smiley battered the back- 
board from outside the New Hampshire 
defense without avail and the next score 
put New Hampshire in the lead. Temple 
tallied next as a climax to a rapid triple 
|>ass but Kelsea tied the score with a foul 
shot. Temple again crashed through 
although well covered, and ( irifufl brought 
the score to Q to 5 from outside the foul 
line. Kelsea and Craig tied the score 
again before the |MTiod ended, however, 
both from the corner of the court. The 
■OOriag in this BSfiod was spasmodic. 
Hoth team put in everything they had 
(Continued on Pas* 2) 



Relay Team 

Loses to B. U. 



Yeteran Hub Quartet Leads Aggie 
Runners all the Way. 



The Aggie relay team, faced by a 
veteran Boston University quartet, was 
forced to drop its first race of the season 
at the K. of C. meet in boston on Jan. 
SO, The II. U. runners left no doubt 
about the outcome by the end of the 
second lap, and finished alwut a third of 
a lap ahead of the Aggie anchor man. 
The time of three minutes and twelve 
seconds was very creditable, about two 
seconds faster than that made last year 
when the teams met. 

This Saturday the squad will Oppose 
Bates and Amherst in a triangular race 
at the B.A.A. Meet. The summary: 
M.A.C— N. Schappelle, T. V. Hum 
berry, J. S. Hall, U F. SnifTen; B.U.— 
J. F. Outhank, Leon Campbell, T. M. 
Hearn, G. W. Mastaglio. Time — 3 min. 
12 seconds. 



Freshmen Outclass 

Turners Falls H. S. 

Yearlings Break Through in Second 
Half and Win by 31—11 Score. 



E. M. Whitney Reads 

"The Fortune Hunter' 



Interpreter of Plays Presents Comedy 
by Winchell Smith in Social Union 
Series. 



Do you want a good rule for being 
worth a million dollars without much 
trouble, within a year? B. J. Bartlett, a 
successful business man in the comedy 
entitled, "The Fortune Hunter" says, 
"The way to \*i worth a million is to marry 
a girl worth a million dollars." This 
comedy by Winchell Smith, the author of 
"l.ightnin' " was given by Kdwin M. 
Whitney, an interpreter of plays, last 
Friday evening in Bowker Auditorium. 

The play has thirteen characters in all, 

each of which calls for ■ distinct interpre- 
tation by Mr. Whitney. So skillfully did 
be c t out each part that it was hard to 

believe that he wis the same man through 

out. Mr. Whitney is well known through- 
out New l.ngland and this is not the first 

time that the Social I'nion has presented 
him it M A A 

"The Fortune Hunter" is the story of 
Nat Duncan who is Unsuccessful in every 
(Continued on Pafle 3) 



The freshmen outclassed the Turners 
I ills High School quintet liy a score of 
.'{I to II last Wednesday. Play was (.■-,! 
and guarding was (lose the first two 
p eri o ds , but the yearlings were leading at 
half time, '.i to (i. The remainder of the 
game was marked by the su|K-rior con- 
dition of the freshmen and their ability 
to penetrate the visitor's five-man de 
tense. Robertson broke through and 
tossed in several timely shots. 

Saturday afternoon the freshmen are 
anxious to pin a defeat on Greenfield in 
revenge for the loss of a football game 
last fall. This contest will follow the 
varsity encounter with I Icily Cross. 

The summary: 

M.A.C. '29 Turners Falls 

B.I I'. B.F.P. 

\Vcbl>er,rf 4 1 i> Shea.lg 1 2 

K, Mey.lf 2 1 S Stotz.rg.c 2 1 5 

(oukos.i I 1 .'{ Waraksa.rg 

KolM-rtson.lg 7 014 Prandcc ki,c Q 
Cox.rg Martineau.rf 2 4 

Escott.lf 

J.Waraksa.lf 



Totafa l » SSI Totals 6 ill 

Referee Ball. Time — 10-min. quarters. 



Two Years Break 

Even in Two Games 



Win from Amherst High, 20-1.), and 
Lose to St. Josephs by 20-18 Score. 



The Two Years took a slow game from 
Amherst High School and lost a hard 

battle to St. Josephs at Pittsfteld. Coat* 

ing from behind in the second half the 

Two Years gained an ample lend, the 

final BCOK being Two Years 20, Amherst 
13. Holland played I good game for his 
team and (oy was high s< orer for Amherst. 
The game with St. Josephs \v.t^ lost 
ifter a hard struggle which ran into an 
Overtime period. The Two Years were 

ahead si the end of the first half and 

were tied with their opponents at the end 
of the SCC Ond . The overtime period de- 
rid d the game in favor of St. Josephs 
with a score of 30 to lx. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 3, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 3, 1926 



TIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Oftcial newspaper of the MasaachinetU 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the studenti. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Mart T. Bovd '26 Editor-in-Chief 

John F. Lambert '26 



Managing Editor 



Editorial 
Cider PreM 
Atklstlcs 



Campus Newt 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Mart T. Bovd '28 

Mary T. Boyd '26 

William L. Dole '27 

Harold L. Clark '28 

L. Rockwell Smith. Jr. *M 

Ernest L. Spencer '28 

Ellsworth Barnard '28 

Edward H. Nichols, '29 

William R. Phinnev, '29 

Frances C. Bruce '27 

Josephine Paniica "28 

W. Gordon Hunter '29 



Co-Ed New* 
Alumni 
Faculty Newt 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Alvin C. Stevens '2« Business Manager 

Charles P. Reed '26 Advertising M anager 

Lawn H. Whitakkk '27 Circulation Manager 

' John E. White '27 

Douglas W. Loring '28 

Charles F. Clagg '27 

Edwin A. Wilder '28 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



time the Philippines have taken rapid 
strides toward modern civilization. The 
arc of the islands is equal to the areas of 
Now England and New York, but the 
ana under cultivation is only equal to 
the combined areas of Massachusetts 
and Khode Island, the same area which 
was under cultivation one hundred years 
ago. Christianity has made slow ad- 
vancement. Under the Spanish, only the 
roast towns were touched at all, and only 
the workman and dependents of tin- 
Spaniards were Christianized. No attempt 
was made to convert the natives in the 
mountains. 

From 1898 until 1916, the Philippines 
were governed by a military governor- 
general from the United States. In 1916, 
under the Jones Rill, the power of making 
laws was given to the native Philippines. 
Since that time the Philippine Islands 
have been governed by a legislature, 
called by many, the "Philippine Debating 
Society". The governor-general still has 
the power of veto. 

The Philippine Islands have always 
been a point of interest to the people of 
the United States, not only because we 
took them from Spain, but also because 
the Philippine Islands is the only Chris- 
tian country in the orient. An important 
part of the trade of the United States is 
with the Philippine Islands. 




Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for maihng at spec at raU 
of postage provided for in scct.on 1103 Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



This Explains It 

The Weather Man's on his vacation; a 
Lady has taken his place, and we sadly 
find she changes her mind at a most 
alarming pace. One day the earth is 
frozen stiff, the next we're slipping in 
mire, while snow hits the ground and then 
blows around, and the mercury wavers to 
higher. 

Our skiis are stacked in the cellar, our 
snowshoes hang on the wall, for the 
Lady never controls the weather, and real 
snow refuses to fall. And "What would 
you use, — yes or no, overshoes?" is the 
biggest question of all. 



VISITORS APPRECIATE 

OUR HOSPITALITY 



All We Need Now is a New Gymnasium 
to Play Them In. 



-CP- 



CHAPEL SPEAKER 

HITS CHILD LABOR 



Scholarship 

Published on the first psfl is the record 
of class scholarship compiled by tin 
Dean's Office. It is interesting, even 
though it is not as yet conclusive, in 
that it brings out several unexpected 
relationships between ability and college 
experience. Kxpci ience in itself is a drug 
on the market; every old person has 
ditCUnive quantities of it. Experience in 
its personal application, however, is 
extremely valuable. The class standings 
demonstrate this to an unexpected degree. 
Sophomore year is notoriously a hard 
year, botany, Physics, Zoology and the 
like are a formidable group. Freshman 
subjects, on the other hand, are com- 
pai.itively easy. And yet the scholarship 
standings in the Freshmrn and Sopho- 
more s.ars diffir hardly at all. The 
Obvious explanation is that the Freshman 
training, which is experience, give our 
minds the ability to handle Sophomore 
subjects. This ability should increase 
proportionally with the years spent in 
colli gt— which, as you will see by ex 
amining the record, is just what it docs. 
At prcstnt the great debate in the 
scholastic world is the relationship of 
teachers' marks to actual scholarship — 
using the term "scholarship" to denote 
true knowledge, and not the glib catch- 
phrases used in exam books. Our marking 
systim is far from satisfactory; the per- 
sonal factor of necessity plays far too 
large a part, and the system tends to 
discourage thought and encourage super- 
ficiality. No one. of course, can go very 
deeply into the subject, because the 
courses are only designed to give outlines 
of the subject, and research has but a 
very slight examination value. "Parrot 
your professor, and pass your course" is 
a sadly true slogan. 

However, marks are at present our only- 
gauge of scholastic ability. They give at 
least an indication of general ability, and 
form a basis for intercollegiate compari- 
sons. 

M.A.C. can be proud of the marks 
given in this record— a large majority of 
the students, at any rate among the two 
upper classes, are over 80. Many colleges 
require each student to pass a certain 
number of courses with a C, or better. 
On this basis, our college would rank 
with the best in the country. 



AGATES SCORE 20-13 
(Continued from Page 1) 

and the feature was the way in which 
the defenses worked. To the observer it 
seemed as though the entire New Hamp- 
shire team concentrated their attention 
on Temple and Partnheimer with some 
left over for the rest. On the other hand, 
Partenheimer seemed to be a veritable 
windmill and Ciriffin a whirlwind, while 
Smiley, Jones, and Temple were in their 
usual form. 

The second half opened like the first 
one, (iriffin scored two points, and 
Partenheimer two more, then Nicora 
tossed the ball neatly through the hoop 
from the middle of the floor and Kelsea 
counted from the corner, the count now 
being l.'J-13. Another session without 
store, and then the M.A.C. organiza- 
tion proved too much for the New Hamp- 
shire team. They l>ccame dcs|>eratc antl 
threw aside care thus paving the way for 
a ratty which the home team soon staged. 
Smiley calmly dropped two fouls through 
the basket antl (iriffin tossed a twin-coun- 
ter from the foul line. No further score 
came for several minutes but the ball was 
in the Agates' possession most of the time, 
(iriffin broke the spell, however, with a 
free try, closely followed by his fourth 
floor basket. 

It would be hartl to pick best men for 
we should have to say something about 
ten men. Perhaps the most spectacuUn 

players were Oriffin antl Craig. Every 
man passed well but perhaps the laurels 
should be given to New Hampshire in 
this re sp ect. The defensive work of 
both teams was excellent as shown by 
the score. 

The summary: 

Mass. Aggies N. 

B.F.P. 

2 1 5 

2 4 



Don Q— rious 

It occurred at a showing of the gallop- 
ing daguerreotypes. The Q — riosity con- 
sisted mainly in: 

1. The touching fidelity to realism 
displayed by the steam pipes, which burst 
into loud hisses just as the worthy hero 
plunged headlong into the foaming 
torrent — thereby giving a Q — rious il- 
lusion of rushing waters. 

2. The still more touching fidelity of 
the Aggie student to Eng. 79, as evinced 
by loud whispers of "I can place that 
line" and 'We hat! that in English, re- 
member?" and '"At's from 'Romeo and 
Juliet'," and from the exceptionally 
erudite even "See Act Thus-and-Thus, 
Scene This, Line That", when the quo- 
tation "With love's light wings I did 
o'er p er c h these walls," flickered into view. 

CP 



He Will — Not 

If a student has a whole weekend 

With not a thing to do 
Hut read a play of Shakespeare 

And write a theme or two: 
And do some reference reading, 

Make up a three hour lab, 
Work out some Physics problems 

And at Ag. Ed. make a stab: 
Then write some French or Spanish 

And study for a test — 
DO you think he'll like that silly song 

"In this college life there's rest." 



A communication was recently received 
at the office of Prof. Curry S Hicks 
which is of general interest to the student 
body as well as to the athletic department 
since it gives concrete evidence of the 
good will which can be directed towartls 
M.A.C. by our treatment of visiting 
athletic teams. 

This letter, from the Attleboro High 
School basketball team and its directing 
officials, expressed a desire to thank the 
students of M.A.C. for the courteous 
treatment which was accorded the visitors 
when they came here and played the 
freshmen on January 8. They mentioned 
especially the member of the student 
committee (Maroon Key) who conducted 
them to the different fraternity houses, 
officers of the fraternities which housed 
them, and the waiter at their table in the 
dining hall. This testimonial was signed 
by the Coach, the Faculty Manager, and 
the Captain of the basketball team. 

A reception which so impresses a 
visiting team is not only a credit to the 
Maroon Key, but also reflects the de- 
sirability of inviting high school teams to 
come here for a week-end to play against 
the freshmen. It is the best possible ad- 
vertisement to attract boys to enter here 
when they graduate from whatever school 
they are attending. 

If Aggie only had a respectable gym- 
nasium, a place where teams could be 
asked to play without apology, an oppor- 
tunity would be provided for more fre- 
quent contact with high schools, especially 
those in the eastern part of the state. 
Many other colleges hold annual basket- 
ball tournaments for secondary schools 
which bring together a large number of 
high school students from all over the 
state, but the best that M.A.C. can do at 
present is to make those few who do 
come here feel that this college is a 
highly desirable one to enter. 



Wiley H. Swift of National Child 
Labor Committee Addresses Student 
Body. 



"I have come to raise two question-, i n 
your minds." Such was the statement of 
Mr. Wiley H. Swift of the National Child 
Labor Committee, who was the speaker 
at Chapel last Sunday. The speaktf 
continued, "I shall not attempt to 
answer these questions. They must be 
answered, not by any one man or group 
of men, but by the whole people." The 
first question asked by Mr. Swift vta, 
"Should the employment of children be 
regulated by law?" In developing this, 
he stated that government exists primarily 
for the protection of the helpless, and 
unless a government does this, it will 
hardly continue. Children are Ikelplesa, 
in that they lack the wisdom of maturity 
and experience and they can make no 
protest. Moreover, a child will try any 
kind of labor which he has seen a man 
perform, and can be injured by certain 
kinds of labor: work that is too heavy or 
too prolonged or that has in it atemeatl 
of danger. It is a fact that many parent! 
allow their children to work harder thai 
they should, and it is also true that then 
are many employers who will hire children 
for any kind of work, if they can get them. 
The second tpiestion, which Mr. Swift 
mentioned briefly at the conclusion of hi* 
talk was, "If you are going to have lawi 
governing child labor, what is the ageacy 
through which these laws should Ik 
enforced." 



Floriculture Team 

Loses at Boston 



-CP- 



Hampshire 

H.F.P. 



Temple, If 
P't'h'mer.rf 
Jones.c 
Smiley, lb 
( iriffin, rb 
Thomas, rb 



Nicora, rb 
Davis.rb 
Kelsea.lb 
2 2 Taylor,*- 
4 1 9 Cotton.rf 
Craig.lf 



1 2 



1 2 


2 1 5| 
2 4 



The Contributor's Corner 

(A clipping from The Boston Herald pre- 
sented to the grateful C. P.) 

An unnamed college had a football 
marvel who fumbled his classes. The 
coach went to the dean and said . . . well, 
he meant that something just had to be 
done. So the dean summoned the pro- 
fessor of chemistry antl suggested that if 
he wanted to bet on the team next season 
it would be well to give the big Swede 
another exam. In time the professor 
reported: "Considering 50 a passing grade, 
he got through all right. I asked him two 
questions — first, what is the color of blue 
vitriol, and he answered 'yellow,' which 
was wrong, antl second, what does the 
formula H20 represent, and he answered, 
'I don't know,' which was right. So I 
gave him 50 percent." 



Connecticut Aggie Winner at Con- 
vention of American Carnation 
Society. 



The M.A.C. carnation judging team 
lost out to the Conn. Aggie antl Rhode 
Island State teams at the Intercollegiate 
Carnation Judging Contest held in Hoston 
last week, at the Annual Convention antl 
Exhibition of the American Carnation 
Society. Th^ Conn. Aggie team took first 
plat'e and V. M. Doolittle, a member of 
that team, carried off the individual 
honors. Rhode Island State College took 
second place, leaving M.A.C. in third. 
The M.A.C. team consisted of R. E. Smith 
who took fifth place G. H. Thurlow who 
(Continued on Page 4) 




THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

The only place in town where you can 
buy Columbia and Rrunswick Phono- 
graphs and Records. Something new 
every week, 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



WRIGLEYS . . . .. 

NEW HANDY PACK 

Fits hand *» 
pocket and purse 

Mora for your money 
and the best Peppermlat 
Chewing Sweet for any money 

Look for Wrigley's P. K. Handy Pack 
on your Dealer'* Counter or f 



Totals 8 420 Totals 6 113 

Score at half time — Mass. Aggie 9, New 
Hampshire 9. Referee — Shea. Time — 
20-minute halves. 



-CP- 



New Commandant 

Speaks at Assembly 



Major Briscoe Traces 
Philippine Islands. 



History of 



m 



At assembly, January 27, Major N. 
Butler Briscoe, Cavalry, (D.O.L.), U.S. 
A., who recently arrived from the Philip- 
pine Islands to take charge of the post at 
M.A.C, traced the history and develop- 
ment of the Philippines. • 

The first foreign nation to colonize the 
Philippine Islands was China, then came 
Japan, the Hindus, the Saracens, the 
Portuguese, antl then the Spaniards. In 
189X the United States took the Philip- 
pine Islands from Spain, antl since that 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Beaumont of Amherst, directed the con- 
cert, the program of which was entirely 
in the hands of the Glee Club. The pro- 
gram was a well chosen one, from the 
light dance air of La Spagnoia to the 
soft soothing lullabye of the Summer 
Wind. Miriam Huss and Lora Batchelder, 
the pianists, played several duet pieces 
and Faith Packard played a solo. The 
double trio did some remarkably fine 
work with its songs especially with the 
pianissimo of Schubert's Slumber Song. 
The girls who make up the double trio 
are - Marion Cassidy and Josephine 
Panzica, sopranos; Evelyn Davis antl 
Ruth balk, second-sopranos; and Miriam 
Huss and F ranees Thompson, altos. 
Miss Thompson also sang a solo. 

Ruth Davison, the manager, has 
arranged another program for next 
Tuesday evening, when the (ilee Club 
will appear in Cushman, Evelyn Davis 
will lead the singing. 

Quoting Professor Rant), "the (dee 
Club has entirely justified its appearance." 



By the Way- 
Mr. Hanna said in chapel: "A blood- 
hound's idea of a perfect day is one full 
of smells." 

And ours is: One without any at all. 
We prefer perfumes. 



It Happened at Aggie 

(Introducing those well known inmates 
at this institution, MAC and Aggie.) 

They meet at the old church door— 
pardon us, at the door of Stockbridge 
Hall.) 

MAC — Hey, where'ya going? 

Aggie — Cross campus — got a rare class. 

MAC — Whad'dye mean, rare? 

Aggie — Oh, not well prepared, and only 
half done. 



-CP- 



Aren't You Right! 

Professor — Now chlorophyll may be de- 
veloped in many other organs besides 
leaves. For example, here is a green 
potato — 

The Hack Row— Irish? 

CP 



And that's that' 



IN EVERY RESPECT 
EVERYBODY'S NEWSPAPER, but 

Because of its thorough 
treatment of amateur sports 
and excellence of its school 
and college news, the 

jBoaton Stinting SrauBrnpt 

Is pre-eminently the 
newspaper for the student 

CLEAN COMPLETE DEPENDABLE 



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. FINELY TAILORED 

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The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
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College orders receive prompt 
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13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



NORTHAMPTON 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 

Paul Hansell, Mftr. 



The Morthampton Repertory Company 

NOW 
PLAYING 

"LOYALTIES" 

By JOHN GALSWORTHY 



NEXT WEEK 
'The Importance of Being Earnest 
By Oscar Wilde 

Evenings at 8.15 Sat. Mat. at 2.15 

Prices: 50c. to $1.10. (including tax) 

Phone 435 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best In Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 

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TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

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PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all Af A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



E. M. WHITNEY READS 

(Continued from Page I) 

think; that he attempts and finally rsadkM 
the point where he is ready to do anythinn 
for money. His college chum, who has 
made a great success in business, proitoses 
that Nat should marry some rich country 
girl and he tells him how to do it. Nat 
seizes the chance and goes to a small 
town. After many interesting and amus- 
ing experiences he wins his fortune, but 
not exactly in the way in which he is 
supposed to. 



FACULTY NOTE 

Professor Frank A. Waugh left Tuesday 
Feb. 2, for Michigan where he intends to 
visit President Butterficld former presi- 
dent of M.A.C. and Dean Phelan, former 
Short Course Director here. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

San Tox Shaving Cream San Tox Shaving Lotion 

San Tox After Shave Talcum 

Will make your shaving a pleasure 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co, 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST & DEACON. Prop.. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 





/-#~A 



The General Electric Com- 
pany, as of December 3, 1924, 
had 37,716 stockholders, of 
whom 45 per cent were 
women. The average num- 
ber of common shares held 
by stockholders was 55. In 
ownership, policies, past and 
present activities, G-E is un- 
selfishly dedicated to the 
cause of electrical p ro gres s. 

A new scries of G-E adver- 
tisements showing what elec- 
tricity is doing in many 
fields will be sent on request. 
Ask for booklet GEK-1. 




This rf/snr hydro-electric unit weight 750 ton* and con mitt a of a vertical shaft 
hydraulic turbine attached to an electric generator delivering 52.000 kilowatt* 
at 13,000 volte. 

Bigger Generators — 
Cheaper Electricity 

A 70,000 horsepower hyclro-tlectric unit recently installed at 
Niagara Falls utilizes the same amount of water as seven 
former 5,000-horsepower units, yet does the work of fourteen 
such units. And it saves 700,000 tons of coal yearly for the 
nation. 

As more and still more uses are found for electricity, larger 
and more economical generators are installed. At the power 
plant, as well as at the consumer's end, important changes and 
startling developments have steadily reduced the cost of 
electricity for light, power, and heat. 

And wherever electricity has blazed its trail— in towns, cities, 
industrial centers, and rural communities — comfort and progress 
have come to stay. 

Generating and distributing electricity concern the technical 
student. But electricity's application in the betterment of 
industry, the professions, and home life concerns every edu- 
cated person. Cheap electricity means many startling achieve- 
ments today, but countless and unbelievable possibilities 
tomorrow. 



GENERAL ELECTRIC 

GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, SCHENECTADY, NEW YORK 



FREE 
CRANK CASE 

SERVICE for 
FOUNTAIN PENS 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

(SUPPLY LIMITED) 

The New College Store 



M BUILDING 



SPECIAL THINGS 

for 
Special Students 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mas* 

Our Laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guarantee* 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OP 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite Post OflBc* 



ALL SET? 

Initiation banquets are here. For the formal banquet we have TUXEDOS, and furnishings. For the informal banquet we have a fine line 

of suits that will please you. Drop in and look our offerings over before Feb. 6. 

EXETER CARL H. BOLTER HYANNIS 

AMHERST 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 3, 1926 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thura. 

7.3t 



The one and only 
"THE IU)N<:ilB.M-K OF 
NOTKK IIAMK" 
Victor Hugo'. Maulernlete, 
with l.on <:huney, Patsy 
Kuth Miller and Norman 
Kerrey. _ . 

News Fable* Comedy 

"The Iron Nag" 1 reel Mack 
Sennett. Admission 

Matinee Children . 2Sc 
Adults • 40c 
Evening Floor . . 40c 
Balcony . 50c 



ALUMNI' We will be very glad to renew acquaintances.—Meals, Lunches, Cigars, Cigarettes, Pipes, etc. 

Drinks to soothe those throats after the basket ball and hockey games. 

YE AGGIE INN — 




Friday 

3.00 
6.4S. 8.30 



Churl en (Buck) Jones, Madge 
Hellamy. 7-axu Pltu & Jane 

Novak In 

"LAZY BONKS" 
Owen Davis* New York stage 
success, Hodge Podge 2 reel 
Craves Comedy. 



Saturday 

3.00 
0.45 8.30 



Mon. 

3.00 
0.45 8.30 



You will And an eicellant 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP . . . 
equipped with the most up-to-date Goodyear 
Machinery and a modern 
SHOE SHINING ?A R LOR 
at U] , Amity St.. - Labrovlt. Block 

Wt understand your requirements and are pre- 
pared to meet your needs. ... 
All work guaranteed. Shoes shxned and dyed. 
VINCENT GRANDONICO. Prop. 



A sequel to "Riders of the 
Purple Sage." 
Tom Mil and iony In 

"THE RAINBOW TRAIL 
Thrill follows thrill In this 
Mood - tingling Zane Orey 

News 2 reel Educational 

Comedy. 



Norma Shearer. Lew Cody 
and Mary Carr In 
"A SLAVE OF FASHION" 
Pathe Review Glenn Tryon 
2 reel Comedy. 




Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We" carry the best in everything 

VALENTINES 

Come and see them 



Evening Slippers — 

Many Styles 
and Materials 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

i PLEASANT STREET, (up one. flight) 



FLORICULTURE TEAM LOSES 
(Continued from Page 2) 

took seventh, and L. F. Sniff en who took 
ninth. It is a singular fact that all three 
teams were coached by MAC. graduates; 
the Connecticut team being coached by 
k. H. Patch '11, the Rhode Island team 
by C. E. Wildon '10, and the MAC. 
team by C. L. Thayer '13. The prizes, 
consisting of a silver cup for the winning 
team and another for the individual with 
the highest score, were bought with funds 
furnished by the three coaches. 

At the Convention, Professor Thayer, 
head of the Floriculture Department, 
read a paper on "The Value of Inter- 
collegiate Flower Judging Contests." Im- 
mediately after the close of his recital, 
the firm of Baur, Steinkamp & Co.. 
offered a silver cup to the winning team 
in a carnation judging contest to be 
staged in connection with the annual 
exhibition of the Society to be held at 
Columbus, Ohio, in 1927. 

Several of the Floriculture students 
attended the exhibition, and afterward 
visited the greenhouses of several carna- 
tion growers in the neighborhood of 
Boston. 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUNS1NGWEAR and MEDALIA 
SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $U9 $1.75 

G. Edward Fisher 



COLLEGE SHOES 



AT — 



TOWN PRICES 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



We have just received another large 
assortment of OVERSHOES at different 
prices. Avoid being too late. 

Hosiery a Specialty 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



JAMES A. L OWELL, BOOKSELLE R 

Whose little girl am I? MY MOTHER'S! 
Whose little girl will I be? ANOTHER'S! 
Unless You want me for your Valentine. 

Unless YOU come early the best VALENTINES and 
NOVELTIES will be gone. 

Give her one of ROBERT FROSTS AUTOGRAPHED POEMS 

and she'll never forget you! 






THOMAS S. CHILDS 

I NCOR POR ATE D 



275 High St. 



Holyoke 



Oculist. Preoption. Filled. Broken len.e. 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCXS mm! other 

reliable make. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Wait 

NEW PRICES 
Men 1 . Whole Sole.. Rubber Heel. - - - ■*•» 
Men'. Half Soles. Rubber Heel. - - - Vn 
Mens Rubber Soles. Rubber Heel. - • *•« 

Men'. Half Sole. um 

Work Guaranteed-AMHERST HOUSE 
Open till 8 P. M. 





Seasonable Suggestions— 

Overcoats, Sheeplined Coats and Mackinaws 

at 20 per cent discount from our usual 
low prices. We also are showing a fine 
line of windbreakers in leather and 
heavy wool priced - - $5 to $1 Z. 
Heavy wool sox fifty cts. to one dollar 
Corduroy Breeches - - $5 



F. M. Thompson & Son 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



Decorate 

yourself 'with 

the degree 

of P. A. 




FINAL CLEARANCE 
PRICES 

.-ON ALL-- 

BOSTONIAN" 

WINTER WEIGHT OXFORDS 

Step in and look them over 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 



L 



MAIN STREET 



AMHERST 



THAT means "Pipa Amoroso" in the Latin, or 
"pipe-lover" in plain campus English. P. A. 
has certainly endeared a pipe to more men than 
any other letters in the smoke-alphabet. Because 
Prince Albert lets a fellow smoke all he wants 
to — and makes him want to! 

Cool as the stare of a marble Venus. Sweet 
as the approach of vacation. Fragrant as spring 
blossoms. Think up your own similes, Fellows. 
You will when you pick P. A. and a jimmy-pipe 
for permanent roommates. Prince Albert is 
great tobacco, and that's not blah. 

Get yourself a tidy red tin of Prince Albert 
today. Fill the bowl of that old jimmy-pipe to 
the brim and borrow a match. Then you're set 
for some great smoke-sessions, as sure as you're 
a foot high. 

FRINGE ALBERT 

— no other tobacco is like it! 



P. A. it told everywhere iji 
tidy rtd lint. Pound end half, 
pound tin hnmtdort, end 
pound erytet-gleif humidort 
with sponge • moittener top. 
And always with ertry bit of 
bile end pereh removed by 
the trince Albert protest. 




© 19 «6. R. J. lUmol.lsTob.feo 
Compiny. Winston-Salem. N. C. 




A FINE ARRAY FROM WHICH TO CHOOSE- JOMpk m*«- n««- —* 

SOUTH WICK BROS. & GAUL' 



Att'» c 



>76 
tural 



SrffJIaaaarhua^ttfi (Ml^ti'fif 



Vol. xxxvi. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEB. 10, 1926 



o. 16 



Few Alumni Return 

For Celebration 



Storm Keeps Many Away. Mid-Winter Alumni Day Program 

Provides Much Activity. 



\ comparatively small number of 
..winini were present at the 1926 Mid- 
xVm ter Alumni Day. which was held 
Imt Saturday. Probably owing to the 
l^avy snowstorm of a day or two pre- 
muus, there were only about ninety 
,lumni on the campus, as compared with 
marly 150 last year. Those who did 
return, however, spent a very enjoyable 
day. Following the program of games 
and sports in the forenoon, there was a 
business meeting of the Associate Alumni. 
\ report was made on collecting the 
pkdfM for the Memorial Building. It 
was also reported that a portrait of the 
late Mr. Mills has been completed and 
will soon be hung in the Memorial Build- 
ing. Following this, plans were presented 
for the Alumni class reunions, and there 
was also a discussion of means of finan- 
cing class activities after graduation. 
Acting- President Lewis then discussed 
the present legislative situation. 

Following the business meeting, lunch 
was served at Draper Hall. In the after- 
noon the alumni were entertained by an 
Inter-Fraternity Sing in Stockbridge Hall. 
Tiny then adjourned to the Drill Hall 
and watched the Aggie team win a fast 
basketball game from Holy Cross. The 
evening was given over to the Initiation 
Banquets of the various fraternities. 

BANQUETSCOMPLETE 
ALUMNI DAY PROGRAM 

Three Fraternities Go to Hotel 
Nonotuck and Two to Draper Hall. 



The Initiation Banquets of the different 
fraternities were held last Saturday eve- 
ning following the Alumni Day cele- 
bratioa. The Q.T.V. banquet was held 
at the house, with torty-one present, in- 
cluding nine alumni. Phi Sigma Kappa 
was entertained at The Davenport, fifteen 
of the sixty-four present being alumni. 
Sigma Phi Epsilon journeyed to the 
Hotel Nonotuck in Holyoke. The party 
(.insisted of twenty-eight members of the 
active chapter, twelve alumni, and six 
(Continued on Page 4) 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



A Rood man is like a tennis ball 
the harder you hit him, the higher 
he bounces. — Anon. 



Wednesday — 

Vanity Basketball: Williams at 

Williamstown. 
Varsity Hockey: West Point at 

West Point. 
Freshman Basketball: Deerfield at 

Deerfield. 
Thursday — 

Intcrclass Hockey: '28 vs. '29 

(Numeral game), 
lnterfraternity Basketball: Kappa 

Sigma vs. Lambda Chi Alpha; 

Non-Fraternity vs Kappa Fpsilon. 
8 p. m. Varsity Debating: M.A.C. 

vs. Univ. of Oklahoma at the 

Memorial Building. 
Friday — 
7 |). m. Social Union Concert: Jugo- 
slav Tamburica Orchestra. 
Varsity Basketball: Wesleyan, here. 
• .lee Club Concert at Bernardston. 
Saturday — 
Vanity Hockey: Univ. of New 

Hampshire. 
Varsity Basketball: Middlebury. 
lnterfraternity Basketball: Kolony 
Klul) vs. Theta Chi; Alpha Gamma 

Rho vs. Kappa Gamma Phi. 
Kappa Sigma House Dance. 
Sunday— 
9.10», m. Chapel. Sermon by Rev. 

Daniel C. Evans, Harvard Univ., 

Cambridge. 

Monday— 

lnterfraternity Basketball: Alpha 
Sigma Phi vs. Q. T. V.; Sigma 
I 'hi Epsilon vs. Kappa Epsilon. 
Tuesday — 
Vanity Hockey: Williams at 
Williamstown. 



PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

WINS INTERFRAT SING 

Lambda Chi Alpha Is Second and 
Kappa Epsilon Third in Spirited 
Contest. 

Phi Sigma Kappa won the first Inter- 
Fraternity Singing contest, held at the 
college as a part of Mid-Winter Alumni 
Day last Saturday, in Bowker Auditor- 
ium. Mr. Sidney B. Haskell, President of 
the Academic Activities Board, presided 
at the contest. In opening the program 
he explained that the purpose of the inter- 
fraternity sing was to replace the annual 
Class Sing which formerly was a big 
feature at Commencement but which was 
abolished last year by a vote of the stu- 
dent body. He also spoke about the silver 
cup which was donated by the Academic 
Activities Board. This cup is to be awar- 
ded annually to the winning fraternity 
and will be given permanently to the 
fraternity which wins the cup for three 
years. Mrs. Alexander B. Beaumont, Dr. 
William H. Davis, and Mr. Lewell S. 
Walker were the judges of the contest. 
In awarding the various places the judges 
considered the general appearance, the 
quality of tone and the singing as a whole. 

Phi Sigma Kappa, under the leadership 
of Neil C. Robinson '27 and accompanied 
by Douglas W. Loring '28 at the piano, 
received 87 points. Second place went to 
l.amlxla Chi Alpha with 85 points, and 
third to Kappa Epsilon with 78. 

The order in which the fraternities 
sang and their respective selections are 
as follows: 

1. Q. T. V. 

Q. T. V. 

Boost Old Aggie 

Edwin E. Marsh '28, leader and 
accompanist. 

2. Phi Sigma Kappa 

Cheer Old Massachusetts 

Phi Sigma Kappa Fair 

Neil C. Robinson '27, leader 
Douglas VV. Loring '28, accompanist 

3. Theta Chi 

Hymn to Evening 

Hymn to Theta Chi 
Emery S. Loud '26, leader 
Carl A. Eraser '26, accompanist 

4. Alpha Gamma Rho 

Cheer Old Massachusetts 
I Want to Back My Chapter 
Herbert F. Bartlett '26, leader 
Frank Stratton '28, accompanist 

5. Kappa Sigma 

Boost Old Aggie 

Come, Gather All Ye Merry Men 
Alvin G. Stevens '26, leader 
Harry E. Eraser '20, accompanist 

6. Kappa Epsilon 

When Twilight Shadows Deepen 
Here's to You, Our Alma Mater 
Elmer E. Barber '26, leader 
James Bower, Jr. '26, accompanist 

7. Lambda Chi Alpha 

Here's to You, Our Alma Mater 
Lambda Chi, Here's to You 
Roy E. Norcross '26, leader 
John F. Lambert '26, accompanist 



Alumnus to Head 

Board of Trustees 



William Wheeler '71 Elected Pre- 
siding Officer of M.A.C. Solons. 



The Trustees of the College, at their 
annual meeting elected William Wheeler 
of the class of 1871 as the Vice- President 
and presiding officer of their board. Mr. 
Wheeler succeeds Hon. Charles A. (Rea- 
son who died last September. He has been 
a trustee of the College for nearly forty 
years and has served as chairman of the 
Committee on Course of Study and 
Faculty. 

Mr. Atherton Clark '77 
chairman of the Finance 
Harcld L. Frost '95 will 
chairman of Committee on Horticulture, 
and Charles H. Preston as chairman of 
the Committee on Experiment Depart- 
ment. Thus all four of the alumni who 
are appointive members of the Board of 
Trustees are serving in important positions. 



was chosen 

Committee. 

continue as 



Informal is 

Called 



Off 



Student Volunteer Convention 
Causes Conflict on March 6. 



The informal scheduled for March 6 
has been cancelled, and in view of the fact 
that there are no other open dates, there 
will be no informal this term. 

On March 6 the college will be host to 
about 200 representatives from twenty 
colleges who represent the Student Volun- 
teer Convention. Undoubtedly many 
students will wish to take advantage of 
the opportunity to attend some of these 
meetings and to hear the truly great 
speakers who will be present. 

This college is host to these delegates 
once every seven years, hence, the com- 
mittee feels that anything that might 
detract from the spirit of the convention 
or hinder any students from attending 
the sessions should be avoided. 



FR0SH WIN FROM 

GREENFIELD HIGH 



Undefeated Yearling Quintet Breaks 
Away in Second Half. 



The Aggie freshmen kept their slate 
clean by defeating the strong Greenfield 
High School outfit, 27 to 17, after the 
varsity's encounter with Holy Cross. The 
guarding was close during the first half 
and the score was 9 to 5 at half-time, 
but the yearlings rapidly drew away from 
the visitors in the final session and won 
by a comfortable margin. 

Webber and Tompkins excelled for the 
yearlin -,j while Welcome, the rangy- 
Greenfield center, featured with several 
long shots. 

Conference Comes 

This Week-End 

S. F. R. L. to Meet at Unity Church 
on Saturday and Sunday. 

Hnal plans ha e lx*en completed for 
the Connecticut Valley Conference of tin- 
Student Federation of Religious Liberals, 
to be held at Unity Church, Amherst, 
on Feb. Hi and 14. Already over thirty 
Smith and Mt. Holyoke girls have regis 
tered, and this fact alone should prove a 
great drawing card for local students. 
The subject for the conference is "The 
Race Problem." 

The conference starts at 3 p. m. on 
Saturday with an address by Prof. Frank 
H. Hankins of Smith College on "The 
Nordic Doctrine", followed by a dis- 
cussion on "Race Prejudice in the United 
States", led by (ieorge B. King, Denison 
College '25. Prof. Phillips Bradley of 
Amherst will speak in the evening. On 
Sunday morning there will be a discussion 
on "The Race Problem in the Colleges", 
led by Mary Merwin, Mt. Holyoke '26. 
The closing address will be given by Pres. 
Lewie of this college, on the subject of 
"Tolerance". 

Registrations for this conference should 
be sent immediately to the Northampton 
office of the Federal JOB, as accommoda- 
tions are strictly limited. The registra- 
tion fee is $2, and this will cover all 
expenses of the conference, including 
meals and over-night accommodations. 



COLLEGIAN PRESENTED 

INTERESTING VOLUME 



Newton Shultis '96 Gives Board 
Biographical Sketch of Railroad 
President. 



The Collegian Board has recently- 
received from Mr. Newton Shultis '96, 
a copy of "A Biographical Sketch of 
Alexander Johnston Cassatt." Mr. Shultis 
an alumnus well known for his thoughtful 
and generous gifts to the college, states 
that this is to be "the foundation and 
cornerstone of a reference library on 
Steam Transportation for the Editors of 
the Massachusetts Collegian." * 

The volume is exceptionally interesting, 
presenting the life and work of Mr. 
Cassatt, who was for many years the 
president of the Pennsylvania Railroad. 
in a forcible and interesting manner. 
Such a library as Mr. Shultis propo s e! 
will l>e a valuable Med to the Hoard, 
and will contribute much to that fund of 
well-rounded information which is one ol 
the e haracteristics of the "Aggie man". 



Holy Cross Fails To 

Mar A ggie Slate 

Griffin Again High Scorer as Crusaders Succumb to Agate's 

Powerful Offense, 37—23 



MIDDLEBURY WINS 
OVERTIME GAME 



Vermont Sextet Triumphs at 2—1 
Score In Second Extra Period. 



The M.A.C. hockey sextet yielded to 
Middlebury before an enthusiastic cheer 
ing section on Mid- Winter Alumni Day, 
but not belore the game had gone into 
two 10 minute overtime periods, to be 
decided by a high shot by Whittemore 
which eluded Palmer in the Aggie cage. 
The M.A.C. team looked the best that 
they have since the Hamilton game. 
Their teamwork was good, their passing 
was good, and the players were all aggres- 
sive. In fact, they outplayed Middlebury 
most of the time. 

Middlebury 's first tally came in the 
opening minutes on a short shot by Whitte- 
more from a fracas in front of the cage. 
The Aggies rallied and carried the puck 
to the other end of the rink and slipped 
it into the net, but evidently the wrong 
entrance was used, for the referee ruled 
the goal invalid. In the second session 
the Maroon and White completely out- 
classed the Vermonters and kept the 
scene of action close to the Middlebury 
goal. Time after time the Aggies shot, 
but Connolly, the goalie, turned back 
everything with amazing coolness. The 
third period opened auspiciously for 
M.A.C, "Jos" Forest taking the puck 
around the left wing and making a 
iK-rfect shot to tie the count. From then 
on the home team tried hard to repeat, 
but the visitors had that honor destined 
for themselves and tallied in the second 
overtime session. 

Although Middlebury won, the Agates 
gave much better e\l ibition of hockey. 
"Ruddy" Moberg and "Joe" Forest 
dribbled past the op|xwing players re- 
peatedly, and "Abie" Abrahamson played 
an aggressive game. The summary: 



Mass. Aggies 

rw, Mol>erg 

c, Fre-sc 

Iw, Forest 

rd, Abrahamson, Swan 

Id, Potter 

g, Palmer 

Score — Middlebury 2, M.A.C. 1. (.oals, 
Whittemore 2, Forest. Referee — Dowd. 
Time — three 15-minute and two 10 
minute overtime periods. 



Middlebury 

Simmons, Hill, Iw 
Kelley, Bossert, c 
Whittemore, rw 
McLaughlin. Id 
Twitchell, rd 
Connolly, g 



Debating Season 

Starts Thursday 

University of Oklahoma Will be 
First Opponent for M. A. C. 



The first varsity home debate of the 
held with the University of Oklahoma 
next Thursday evening, February 11, at 
8 p. m. in the Memorial Building. The 
(piestion to be debated is "Resolved, that 
the States Should Re-consider the Child 
Labef Amendment." 

M.A.C. will uphold the affirmative 
side of the question. The college will be 
r ep r esen ted by Fliot P. Dodge '26 of 

Beverly, Ralph \V. Haskins '27 of (ire, n 
field, and Herman K. Pickens '27 of 
Stoneham. All of these three men have 
taken part in the varsity debate! last 
year and therefore are experienced in 
the art of debating. 

At present, the Univ. of Okalahoma 
debating team is making a tour through 
the Fast. It is opposing several college*, 
among which are Boston I niversitv, 
Bowdoin, and M.A.C. As soon as this 
tour is completed it will start on a tour 
through the West. 



The Annual Carnation Night of the 
Holyoke and Northampton Florists and 

Gaxdenera Club was held in French Hall, 

Tuesday evening, Feb. 2. Mr. James 
Wheeler of Natick, formerly president of 
the American Carnation Society, talked 
on the culture ol carnations 



Sore at half time— M.A.C. 22, llolv 
Cross (i. Referee — Whalen. Time — -two 
20-minutc periods. 



The Mass. Aggie quintet added another 
victory to its unmarred slate last Saturday 
afternoon, Mid-Winter Alumni Day, by 
taking Holy Cross 37 to 2.1. The Agates 
played the fastest basketball they have 
shown this year. In the first half, they 
established a sixteen point lead, the score 
at the end of the |>eriod being 22 to 6. 
But in the next period, with several sub- 
stitutions in the Aggie ranks, Holy Cross 
out scored the Agrarians by two points. 
Since Amherst was beaten by Springfield 
recently this leaves the M.A.C. club in 
sole possession of the title "An Undefeated 
Tea m" among the colleges of NewKngland. 

The distinguishing feature of the game 
was the aggressiveness displayed by l>oth 
teams. However, the success in the score 
was determined by the way in which this 
aggressiveness was manifested. Holy 
Cross played a five man defense but on 
only a slight provocation they would 
break this formation and play man to 
man. On the other hand the Agates' 
fight was shown in their superb passing 
and their usual cleverness in following the 
ball, without abandoning their organizat ion. 

"Uirry" Jones started the scoring with 
a cut and Partenheimer piled on two more 
points with a long shot In-fore the visitors 
could get oriented. However, when Jones 
was spilled, Shanahan scored for Holy 
Cross from underneath. Smiley flashed in 
his usual way with a cut and tallied, 
followed by a successful foul shot by 
Partenheimer and a dazzling exhibition 
of passing which was culminated by 
another s< ore by Smiley. This 9 to 2 
score all hap|*-ned in an incredibly short 
time and it was done so well that the 
Purple was completely taken off its feet. 
However, they rallied and kept the Aggies 
busier although the latter did not stop 
tallying. Smiley dr o p ped one through the 
hoop from twenty feet away, diiltin cut 
down the sideline and under like a Hash, 
and Partenheimer counted on a follow-in 
shot, which together with foul shots 
brought the count to 16 4. At this point 
the Holy Cross captain, Burt, was sent 
in for O'Neil and Kelso replaced Smiley. 
During tin- remainder of the half only 
two floor biskets were made, one by 
(iriffin and the other by Kelso, both as 
the result of cutting under the basket but 
each counted twice by free tries. 

The second half opened with Murdough 
playing in place of Jones, and Kelso in 
place of Smiley. Without their full 
power '" 'he back court, the Agates were 
heavily beaeiged by the Purple tossers 
and the period was not so overwhelmingly 
MAC. Reilly scored from under the 
basket ; Kelso heaved a long shot for the 
Maroon; Reilly dropixd another one 
through from an angle; and Kitteridge 
and Shanahan tallied from underneath 
diminishing the- lead to 21 to 18. Smiley 

replaced Kelso and then proceeded to 

make his presence felt again, although 
be did not score- again daring the game. 
Partenheimer and Temple wire the- next 
to tally, following which scoring came a 
series of free tries and a basket by Kitte-r- 
idge, from which M.A.C. emerged with 
only an eleven point leicl, the- score now 
iM-ing .'<l to 20. Griffin who had not been 
heard from in the- score booh since the 
first |>criod pr oc e e ded to acid four more 
l>oints to the Aggie count with a one- 
hand shot from close- quarters ane| an 
under the basket try. Re'lly and Temple 
added two apiece- more and the final tally 
came as the result of a foul shot by the 
Holy Cross captain. 

f iriffin was the- Aggie's high scorer anel 
he- was certainly one of the best men on 
the- fiVir although Smiley and Temple 
wen- also outstanding. For the Purple, 

Reilly was an able shooter and a valuable 
floor mift. The- summary: 

Mass. Aggie Holy Cross 





B.F.P. 


B.I-.P. 


Temple. II 


% 3 O'Neill, rg 


o 


PVhWr.rf 


1 3 1 Burt.rg 


2 2 


[eilsen.rf 


o Brady,!g 


1 1 


|ones,c 


1 2 Kitteridge-, c 


8 1 8 


Murdough ,c 


Shanahan, rf 


2 1 8 


Smiley, Ig 


8 8 Reilly, rf 


a 2 8 


Kelso.lg 


3 4 McK'r'g'n.rf.lf 


o 


Crifhn.rg 


1 210 Conncirs.lt 


2 2 


Thomas, rg 



1") 7.'i7 Totals 




Totals 


7 WSi 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY. FEB. 10, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 10, 1926 






Til MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 
Mart T. Boyd "2« Editor-in-Chief 

Jq*K F. Lambert 26 Managing Editor 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 



Editorial 
Cider PreM 
Athletic* 



Cempiii Newt 



Co-Ed Newt 
Alumni 
Faculty News 



Mary T. Boyd '26 

Mary T. Boyd '26 

William L. Dole "27 

Harold L. Clark "28 

Rockwell Smith. Jr. '2K 

Ernest L. Spencer 28 

Ellsworth Barnard '28 

Edward H. Nichols, '29 

William R. Phinney, '29 

Frances C. Bruce '27 

Josephine Panzica '28 

W. Gordon Hunter '29 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Altiw G. Stevens '26 Buiineaa Manager 

Charles P. Reed '26 Advertising Manager 

Lewis H. Whitaker '27 Circulation Manager 

! John E. White "27 

Douglas W. Loring '2k 

Charles F. Clagg '27 

Edwin A. Wilder '28 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered at tecond-clatt matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special rate 
of postage provided for in section 1103. Act ol Oc- 
tober. 1817 authorized August 20. 1918. 



Criticism's Turn-About 

"Turn-about is (air play." We pain- 
fully inscribed it in our copyliooks and 
pritfgishly used it as an alibi for taking 
away a cherished plaything from a little 
schoolmate, but however trite it is, it is 
also true. Turn-about M fair play. 

Our alleged current overemphasis of 
athletics has lately come in for a great 
deal of criticism and discussion. But 
how about the other activities? It is 
fair to consider athletics as the only 
over -emphasized part of college life? 
Emphatically not, and so the turn-about 
has come to the campus. 

Mr. Mollis of the Oxford Debate Team 
started it, when he came out in print with 
the bold statement that "the American 
campus is over-organized." "Activities," 
further, "arc popular beca u se the teachers 
are dull." Hardly, Mr. Mollis. Activities 
are popular, when and if they are, chiefly 
because they offer a means rj| self e\|>u ■■> 
sion. There are secondary reasons of 
credit-catching and politics, but at least 
they urc secondar,, and what more CM 
you *ay of any human activity? The 
campus is only a PM Cr oC OM n, after all. 

However, this statement bids fair to 

put activities on a par with athletic M 
far .t- .Hm ussion and criticism are con- 
cerned, The New student width reflects 

national student Sentiment, lias started a 

country wide poll of the colleges, asking 
such (motions as; 

•i> the theory true that small colleges 

are trying to form a parallel to every 
organization in big schools, and do they 
Ktffei Of not if this is true.-' 

"Are 'departmental club-' the rcMilt of 

a desire for more informal and interesting 

■tody? Or are they a means of faculty 

competition lor undergraduate popularity, 
and frequented l>> the grade-hounds? 

"Do activities leave the student with- 
out necessary time for privacy and 
meditations?" 

These questions are interesting, and 
certainly provocative <>t d kc us s ion. Ihe 
college today is under fire, but it is rc- 
freshing to realise that the fire will not 
necessarily be directed against one phase 
only of college life. Criticism apparently, 

will be laying down a general barrage, 
under which athletics and academics will 
sutler alike. 

As far as the last query goes, we believe 
that here at least it is betide the question 
— ami that not from a scholastic, but a 
humanistic. Standpoint. The average 
healthy human being- that being im»t of 
us — has neither the power of, or the desire 
for, continued meditation. We are too 
busy living to think. The Babbitry who 
support Rotary Clubs and read The 

American Msgmmne that means most of 

us undergraduates— are not strong on the 
"setting and thinking". We'd rather go 
to the movies. The occasional genius will 

of coarse desire "time for privacy and 

meditation," but the genius will not be 
overly concerned with activities anyway. 
"Tuin-about is fair play." Ihe activists 
have severely criticized the athletes. Now 
it is the turn of the "over emphasized 
athletes" to say what they think of the 
"over organized campus". 



Managerial Elections 

In order that the student Inxly will be 
ready for a question which will surely be 
submitted to the student forum, we feel 
that an editorial on this particular jioint 
is in order. At present, competitors for 
athletic managerships work through a 
season and then take an examination 
which eliminates all the candidates but 
two or three. These men are sent before 
the student body who elect one. 

At a recent meeting of the managers of 
athletics, a discussion of this subject was 
held and the group were unanimous in 
declaring that this system was a farce. 
Many are the examples that can be cited 
to show the inefficiency of student body 
elections. Mow much does a student 
body know about the relative managerial 
ability of the candidates? For example, 
in the case of a close election, the co-ed 
vote swings it. Co-eds know some men 
and not others and they generally know 
them in a way which has little bearing on 
managerial ability. In a case like th.it, 
one co-ed may pass the word along to 
vote for a certain man and the ones who 
have no particular reason for choosing 
either man vote for the fortunate one 
whose name has been thus passed around. 
Such a situation is not merely theoretical, 
it has o c cur red time and time again. 
Sometimes, so it is said, the l>cst looking 
man is elected, somewhat in the fashion 
as the first president of the freshman cfatfl 
is elected. 

Perhaps a more frequent occurence, 
however, is the case of a man who is 
elected because he belongs to I loyal 
fraternity in a strong group of fraterni- 
ties. Ticklish as is the subject, we believe 
in being frank; the existence and power of 
fraternity politics is not often denied. It 
is natural that a man without other con- 
victions on the abilities of the candidates 
for a managership, would vote for a 
fraternity brother with whom he lives 
and whom he knows best. Moreover it 
often happens that some of the facts of 
the competition are published, such as 
the amount of time that each competitor 
put in; and the students will still vote 
according to other prejudices. 

But so far no constructive criticism has 
been offered. The best soluti >n that has 
Come to light to date is to let the final 
choice rest in the hands of those who 
know more about the relative abilities of 
the candidates than anyone else. The 
managers have VOttd to sill mit to the 
student body a solution in v hi< h a com- 
mittee of four will make the final choice. 
The committee shall consist of Prof. 
Micks, the coach of the sport concerned, 
the retiring manager, and the captain 
Thus two I, unity members ami tWO 
undergraduates will vote with little social 

bias but based on actual observation. 

Possibly, this system may have some weak 
spots but the managers Inliive that it is 
the best solution available, and I take the 
liberty to add that the COLLBGIAN 
indorses this decision. W . L D. 




This Turn-About Idea 

Seems fair enough, although one won- 
ders just what will be left of our harmless 
diversions after the critics finish with us. 
This turn-about stuff reminds us of De 
Wolf Hopper's remark in his between the 
act speech in "The Student Prince". Me 
said: "They say 'The worm will turn'. 
Silly idea! Why should a worm turn? 
lie's the same on both sides." 

CP 



AT THE ABBEY 



The annual Wednesday afternoon Delta 
Phi tea was held last Thursday afternoon 
in the Abbey living room. Bridge was 
played and tea was served. 
M 

The S.C.S. took advantage of the snow 
and had a sleighing party last Saturday- 
evening. The party, chaperoned by Miss 
Hamlin, went to the foot of the Notch. 
On their return refreshments were served 
to revive them by those for whom there 
was no room. 

M 

Y.W. served coffee to the co-eds after 
dinner on Sunday. 



-M 



ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 

PURCHASES ICE PLANER 



New Machine Will Keep Surface of 
Pond Smooth All Winter. 



BANQUETS COMPLETE 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
delegates from other chapters, At the 
banquet <>i Kappa Gamma Phi, which 

was helil at the house, there were twenty- 
three members, ol whom lour were alumni. 
(Continued on Puii»- 4) 



Campus Improvements 

The campus looked like a location for 
the great storm scene in "Way Down 
East" last week, with the struggling stu- 
dents staggering sadly through the swirl- 
ing snows. (This is the only safe place 
in whiih to indulge in alliteration. They 
mark you down for it in English themes.) 
Fighting acrcss our all-too-extensive cam- 
pus in the teeth of a biting north-easter 
has started up interest again in the pro 
DOied Intercampus Subterranean Campus 
System. We sent the C. P.'s reporter 
aioand to one of the Subway's staunchest 
supporters, and here is what they 
proiK>se : 

There shall be constructed a series of 
e'eCiric-lighted steam-heated tunnels, at 
least four feet wide, connecting the 
opposite sides of the campus — with main 
lines between Chem and Math, Stock- 
bridge and Math, and French and Stock- 
bridge, with side lines to all other build- 
ings. 

It is conservatively estimated that 
such a system would save the college at 
least live thousand dollars a year. There 
would be no more shovelling of campus 
walks, no more candidates for thilnlirm- 
ary, and no one late to class. Wt- would 
all be on time, and we would be warm 
and well and wise. 

As to the (irounds Dept. and improve- 
ments, here's another idea. Why not have 
them extend their useful custom of fling- 
ing sand on the sidewalks a little further, 
and give them pails of tinting materials, 
so thai our eves will rest on restful ex- 
panses of, say, greenish snow, instead of 
the present crudely glaring reaches of 
white? 

CP 

Local Art 

Before any building, beside any walk, 
is a Stretch of snow, but not as the snows 

of yesteryear, broken only by incidental 

dog or student tracks. We now have 
Minic snow -decorated with huge initial 
ings, dass numeral! and five-foot "Rahs", 
fraternity symbols, and even with French 

mottoes. It makes walking interesting, 

and, ii you happen to Ik- walking the 

other way, intriguing when such Through- 
the-l.ooking-< nBSS words as "link! 6291" 
stream by. Art. like murder, will out. 



Please notice that the co-ed editor has 
suffered a relapse this week. 



When winter comes to Amherst ordin- 
arily the first sport that can be enjoyed 
is skating on the college pond. Thus. 
who enjoy skating know, much to their 
regret, however, that it is a very uncertain 
sport. If the pond isn't covered with 
snow the ice is frequently very poor. 
Consequently skating has been a neglected 
s|>ort in years gone by. Now, however, 
skating should come into its own at 
M.A.C. because the athletic department 
has recently purchased an ice planer. 
This machine will make it possible to 
keep the surface of the pond as smooth 
as glass. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 



-CP 




Renunciation 

We take great pleasure in publishing 
thU wail from the disillusioned pea of 
one of our f masculine, of course!) students. 

Very s ad did the lady, perhaps, powder 

her nose m public? As far as vanity goes, 
though, we've never noticed it was an 
exclusively feminine trait. In fact it is 
almost essentially masculine, and its most 
striking manifestation is in their assump- 
tion of freedom from it. However — 

Vanity, vanity ! ' 

Female inanity, 
Almost insanity — 

What can you do? 

It rates the profanity 
t )f male humanity — 
I lelpless nuindanitv : 
No more! I'm through! 

"Desperate Dick." 

CP 



NEW HANDY PACK 

Fits hand ** 
pocket and purs* 

Morn for your money 
and the best Peppermint 
Chewing Sweet for any money 

Lock (or Wrigley's P. K. Handy Pads 
ft on your Dealer's Counter 07 ~ 



The Week's Best Joke 

Dean Machmer hopefully saying in 
chapel: "Now about this little matter of 
lateness. I am sure this is just careless- 
ness on your part, due mostly to this very 
bad weather, and that from now on you 
will be (.ireful to be on time," while a 
do/en or more delinquents punctuated 
his remarks with clatter of feet and the 
rhythmic shifting over of the various 
rows in order to permit the late comers a 
convenient seat. 

CP 



IN EVERY RESPECT 
EVERYBODY'S NEWSPAPER, but 

Because of its thorough 



treatment of amateur sports 
and excellence of its school 
and college news, the 

ioaton iEttnung Srattarrtpt 

is pre-eminently the 
newspaper for the student 

CLEAN COMPLETE DEPENDABLE 




Dairy Cows and Beef Cattle 



And that's that! 



Every state fair and livestock show conducts a feeding 
contest. The premium list is the book of rules. Every 
contestant must pay an entry fee or stall rent and also 
buy his feed. 

Most of these fairs and shows are commercial enterprises and 
they arc expected to earn a profit. They arc supported by all 
agricultural colleges and livestock associations because they help the 
farmer and feeder. 

VVc thoroughly believe in rewarding feeders for their skill in 
getting the utmost out of their feeding materials. They should be 
encouraged in every way possible, therefore we have launched the 
greatest feeders" contest of all — 

122 Cash Prizes— $15,000.00 

14 Prizes for Cow Testing Associations $3,000.00 

14 Prizes for Individual Dairy Herds 2,100.00 

7 Prizes for Championship Cows 1,000.00 

14 Prizes for Beef Cattle Feeders 2,500.00 

12 Prizes for supervisors or verifiers 2,650.00 

24 Prizes for herd managers 1,250.00 

37 Prizes for co-operating feed dealers 2,500.00 

122 Prizes, totaling $15,000.00 

Every feeder of six or more dairy cows, or forty or more beef 
cattle is urged to enter this contest. You can feed anything you 
like just so the grain ration contains 25% or more of Com Gluten 
Feed— the protein feed that makes meat or milk at the lowest cost. 

You should enter vour college herds. The members of your animal husbandry 
classes should become certifying supervisors for other feeders. lnis will oe 
valuable experience in your college course and may earn the supervisors prizes. 

This contest starts April 1 and ends September jo. 1920. The simple rules 
and conditions are given in detail in our Bulletin No. 4 ..This bulletin ana 
our new book. "The Gospel of Good Feeding" will be mailed free. Write lor 
them Now. 

Associated Corn Products Manufacturers 

Feed Research Department 
Hugh C. Van felt, Director 

208 South La Salle St., Chicago, III. 




3 



[ICKEY-FREEMAN F1NE fabr,cs 

. FINELY TAILORED 

Customized Clothes 



READY TO WEAR XT 




The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
H..NRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



«u1 E— tait 



I The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 



IS AT 



DRURY'S 



I College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

IDRURY'S bakery 



TWO YEAR QUINTET LOSES 

TO SACRED HEART II. 



Stiff Battle Goes to llolyoke Team 
by 32—17 Score. 

The Two Year five lost a fast SJUSS to 
Sacred Heart on the Holyoke Ili^h School 
court last Tuesday night. Although they 
put up a stiff battle the Two Years were 
OUtplayad by the Holyoke team. West 
and Ryan played well for the Two Year 
men while Sheehan starred for Holyoke. 

Up to the present about ten men have 
turned out for freshman debating. Some 
of them show promise, and it is hoped that 
one or two of them will turn out well 
enough to help the varsity team, which 
has a hard schedule this year. A debate 
has been arranged with the B. U. fresh 
men, and it is hoped that another one 
can lie arranged with Salem lliu"- 



TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 3258 



WINCHESTER 

[porting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



;he Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



DNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



Junior Varsity 

Beats "Y" Quintet 

McEwen and Jensen Feature Fast 
Game. 



The M.A.C. Junior Vanity trounced 
the Northampton "Y" quintet in a t.iM 
game played last Thursday. Honors were 
about even in the first half, hut soon 
after the opening of the second the 
MAC. team forged ahead. M< Kwen and 
Jensen were high scorers for the evening. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

San Tox Shaving Cream San Tox ShavinglLotion 

San Tox After Shave Talcum 

Will make your shaving a pleasure 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST & DEACON. Props. 



A 30 year course 



feeding 



'pHE Purina Mills organization believes in continual 
x study. We've actually been studying livestock feeding 
for over a quarter of a century. 

We've been through our practical training too. We've 
tested hundreds of rations in the feed lot We've worked 
with thousands of farmers and dairymen. We've helped 
them weigh their milk and keep records of their feed 
costs. We've maintained our own chemical and research 
laboratories. At the present time we have over one 
hundred agricultural college graduates in our employ, 
and are continually hiring more. 

The other day a farmer was asked why he fed Purina 
Chows instead of mixing his own rations. Think his 
answer over. 

'When I feed Purina Chows, I start in at a point it 
has taken Purina Mills 30 long years to reach ! ' ' 

PURINA MILLS 



St. Louis 

Buffalo 
Fort Worth 
Kansas City 



Miss 



o u r i 




Nashville 
East St. Louis 
Minneapol is 



,l-*v I ■*-. 



i> 







Carrying Away the Screeningt 

S*vrral carina li of icrrenin*\ !■•■ 
PuriTvi Mi'N«»f,u/-rlr AB«»aM»«o* 

Partus Chrnm art carefully ■' 

the feeler i< aiiure.l the k'thtlt ftfib 
when he huy% fin fee. '» in ( ' ' ' m '• ' 



VW W WaVktS V b WVW 



FREE 
CRANK CASE 

SERVICE for 
FOUNTAIN PENS 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

(SUPPLY LIMITED) 

The New College Store 



M BUILDING 



SPECIAL THINGS 
for 

Special Students 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mass 

Our <-»undry First Claaa 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite Poat Ofllca 



BLOW YE WINDS HEIGH HO 

roving you may go but you'll not mind the wind if you are clothed in one of our sturdy, dependable OVERCOATS that are selling at a 

substantial discount of 20 per cent. 

EXETER CARL H. BOLTER HYANNIS 

AMHERST 



. - : 



inn 







THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 10, 1Q26 



Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thura. 

>.M. 

7.3S 



Kumon Novurro. Harriet 
Hammond & Wesley Barry 
in "THE MIDSHIPMAN" 
mud i- with the cooperation 
of the U. S. Navy! The Him 
play you've heard so much 
about! * reel Mer- 

News Pablea maid Comedy 
No advance In prices 



Friday 

3.M 

4.45, S.M 



Saturday 

l.M 
• 45 S.M 



dy. 

J tie 



Mae Buach. 
Creifthton Hale & Certru 
Olmatead In 

"TIME THE COMEDIAN" 
Sport light 2 reel Pmthe 

Comedy 



Mon. 

S.M 

• 45 8.J0 



Milton SHU In 
"THE KNOCKOUT" 
News 2 reel Comedy 



Matt Moore & Kathryn 
Perry In 

"THE PIRST YEAR" 
John Colden'i stage "ucceM, 
On the "battle front with 
a newly married couple. 
Pathe Review 2 reel Mack 
Sennett Comedy 



ALUMNI! We will be very glad to renew acquaintances.—Meals, Lunches, Cigars, Cigarettes, Pipes, etc. 

Drinks to soothe those throats after the basket ball and hockey games. 

==_ YE AGGIE INN — = 



You will find an eicellant 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP . . . 

equipped with the moet up-to-date Goodyear 

Machinery and a modern 

SHOE SHINING PARLOR 

at II) Amlty-St.. - Labrovltt Block 

Wt understand your requirements and or* prt- 

tared to nseet your needs. 

AH work guaranteed. Shoes shtned and dyed. 

VINCENT GRANDONICO. Prop. 



Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the beat in everything 

VALENTINES 

Come and see them 



Evening Slippers- 
Many Styles 
and Materials 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



BANQUETS COMPLETE 
(Continued from Page 2) 

A party of forty-two, including seventeen 
alumni, went to the Weldon Hotel in 
Greenfield. Alpha Sigma Phi and Lambda 
Chi Alpha held their banquets at Draper 
Hall. The former had forty-five members 
present, of whom ten were alumni, while 
the Lambda Chi Alpha group had eight 
alumni among the forty-eight who atten- 
ded. At Kappa Sigma's banquet, which 
was held at The Perry, there were fifty- 
five in attendance, ten being alumni. A 
party of forty-six from Alpha Gamma 
Rho, including ten alumni, two delegates 
from the Connecticut chapter, and Prof. 
Alexander from the Cornell Chapter, 
went to the Hotel Nonotuck in Holyoke. 
Kappa Epsilon held its banquet at the 
White House Inn, Northampton, ten 
alumni being among the thirty-one who 
were present. Delta Phi Alpha also held 
its banquet at the Nonotuck, with twelve 
members present. 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUHSINGWEAR and MEDALIA 
SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $U9 $1.75 

G. Edward Fisher 



COLLEGE SHOESI 

TOWN PRICES 



PAGE'S SHOE STOREl 

We have just received another Urpl 
assortment of OVERSHOES at different 
prices. Avoid being too late. 

Hosiery a Specialty 

JOHN POTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up on. M*ht) 

accurately replaced 
BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and oth« 

reliable make. 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

The only place in town where you can 
buy Columbia and Brunswick Phono- 
graphs and Records. Something new 
every week, 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



JAMES A- LOWELL, BOOKSELLER 

Whose little girl am I? MY MOTHER'S! 
Whose little girl will I be? ANOTHER'S! 
Unless You want me for your Valentine. 

Unless YOU come early the best VALENTINES and 
NOVELTIES will be gone. 

Give her ant of ROBERT FROSTS AUTOGRAPHED POEMS 
and she'll never forget you! 



275 High St. 



Holyoke 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Wait 

NEW PRICES 

■fast Whole Solee. Rubber Heels - - - »J» 

Men's Half Soles. Rubber Heels - • • »™ 

Mens Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels • - *•» 

Mens Half Soles ,aw 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOUSE 
Open till 8 P.M. 



Seasonable Suggestions— 

Overcoats, Sheeplined Coats and Maklnaws 

at 20 per cent discount from our usual 
low prices. We also are showing a fine 
line of windbreakers in leather and 
heavy wool priced - - $5 to $IZ. 
Heavy wool sox fifty cts. to one dollar 
Corduroy Breeches - - $-> 



When it's a rainy 
night— and with three crafty 
bridge players your luck 
is running wild 
—have a Camel! 






F. M, Thompson & Son 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes 






FINAL CLEARANCE 
PRICES 

.-ON ALL-- 

BOSTONIAN" 

WINTER WEIGHT OXFORDS 

Step in and look them over 




WHEN the dark skies are 
pouring rain outside. 
And fickle fate deals you 
hands at bridge that you 
play with consummate 
skill — have a Camel! 

For Camel is the silent 
partner that helps every 
deserving player win his 
game. Camels never hurt 
or tire the taste, never 
leave a trace of cigaretty 
after-taste. Regardless of 
the gold you spend, 
you'll never get choicer 
tobaccos than those 
rolled into Camels. 

So this evening as you 
ply your unerring skill, 
evoke then the mellow- 
est fragrance that ever 
came from a cigarette. 

Have a Camel! 




BOLLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 



Camels represent the utmost in cigarette quality, 
choicest of Turkish and Domestic tobaccos are blended into 
Camels by master blenders and the finest of French cigarette 
paper is made especially for them. Into this on! brand is 
concentrated all of the knowledge, all of the skill of the 
world's largest organization of expert tobacco men. 



©1926 




Our highest wish, •/ »«* 
do not yel know Cam" 
quality, it that you try 
them. f We inriteyou* 
compare Corneh ■"'» 
any cigarette made " 

any price. 
R. J. Reynold. Tobsc" 

Company 



A FINE ARRAY FROM WHICH TO CHOOSE 



Dohbs Hats and Caps, Parker Shirts, Robertson's Scotch golf hose and sweaters, McCurruch Neckwear, Joseph May and Dorward Foreign 
Top Coats, Fashion Park Clothes, and our own Custom Tailoring of distinction. What more could a man «.k. 



h uftfc t 
1 Lb i <j 1926 



She JHasBarintsrttfi (Eflllggftm 



Vol. xxxvi. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEB. 17, 1926 



No. 17 



Many Awards Made 

In Insignia Chapel 



Twenty-Six Football Letters Given Out. 

Well Rewarded 



Academic Activities 



Fifty-five Aggie students were awarded 
either athletic or academic honors at the 
insignia chapel last Friday morning when 
the athletic letters and academic certifi- 
cates and medals were given to those who 
| ulVl . during the past few months won 
recognition for their work in their chosen 
activities. Twenty-six men received foot- 
ball letters; four, cross-country letters; 
eight, gold track shoes; nine men and 
women were awarded academic medals; 
and twenty received certificates in the 
various judging teams. 

Awards in football were made as follows: 
captain's certificate to Lawrence L. Jones 
•j(, of Campello; player's certificates and 
nreateri to William G. Amstein '27 of 
South Deerfield, Frederic A. Baker '26 
of Springfield, Albert C. Cook '28 of 
\\ iverley, Richard W. Fessenden '26 of 
Middleboro. Edwin J. Haertl "27 of West 
Kuxbury, Chester W. Nichols '26 of 
Natick, Henry H. Richardson '26 of 
Millis, Myron N. Smith '26 of Millbury, 
and John Tulenko '26 of Sunderland. The 
following men who have previously re- 
ceived sweaters were awarded player's 
(Continued on Page 2) 



DEBATING TEAM 

DEFEATS OKLAHOMA 



HOCKEY TEAM 
WINS FROM ARMY 



Hucksters Carry Away 2—1 Victory 
in Speedy Game at West Point. 



Victorious Team Takes Affirmative 
Side of Child Labor Amendment 
Question. 



GLEE CLUB SINGS 

IN BERNARDSTON 

Much Snow Encountered in Fourth 
Trip of Aggie Songsters. 

The M.A.C. Musical Clubs gave their 
fourth concert of the term last Friday 
night in the Bernardston Town Hall. 
Because of the heavy snow only a com- 
paratively few people were present. The 
autos conveying the clubs were greatly 
hamiwrcd by the huge drifts encountered, 
and did not reach the hall until after the 
concert was scheduled to begin. 

A tew shifts were made in the program 
given in previous concerts. The quartet, 
consisting of Donald H. Campbell '27, 
Herbert F. Bartlett '26, Clarence Parsons 
'27 and James E. Burnham '26, gave its 
first public performance, taking the second 
place on the program. John E. White '27 
gave a trombone solo, which was very 
well received. Harold K. Ansell '29 was, 
as usual, the feature of the evening with 
his eccentric dancing. 

William I. Goodwin "20 was the faculty- 
representative on the trip. Several 
alumni were present at the concert, 
including Frank Root '24 and W. C. 

Grover '25. 

Three concerts have already been 
signed up for the Boston trip, and the 
management expects to locate one more. 
Performances are assured in Rutland, 
Stow and Auburndale. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



// it is not seemly, do it not; if 
it is not true, speak it not. 

— Marcus Aurelius. 



SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAUL" 



Wednesday — 

Varsity Basketball : Springfield, here 

Thursday — 
Varsity Hockey: Amherst, here. 

Friday — 

Freshman Basketball: Turners Falls 

there. 
Interfraternity BasketbaU: Kappa 
Sigma vs. Kolony Klub; Delta 
Phi Alpha vs. Non-Fraternity. 

Saturday — 

Varsity Basketball: Vermont, here. 
Freshman Basketball: Arlington, 
Vt., there. 
Monday — 
Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 
Varsity Basketball: C. A. C. at 

South Manchester, Conn. 
Varsity Track: Indoor meet with 
W. P. L, Worcester. 
Tuesday — 

Int. rfraternity Basketball: Phi Sigma 

Kappa vs. Alpha Sigma Phi; 

Alpha Gamma Rho vs. A. T. G. 

Wednesday— 

Assembly; Prof. Dallas Lore Sharp, 

Hingham. 



Before a fairly large audience the M.A. 
C. debating team defeated the I'niversity 
of Oklahoma team last Thursday evening 
in Memorial Hall by a decision of 2 to 1. 
Although this was the first intercollegiate 
debate of the season for the home team, 
the speakers showed wonderful self- 
control and freedom of expression. 

The question in debate was "Resolved, 
that the states should ratify the Child 
Labor Amendment". The affirmative 
was taken by M.A.C, which was repre- 
sented by Eliot P. Dodge '26, Ralph W. 
Haskins '27 and Herman E. Pickens '27. 
The University of Oklahoma team con- 
sisted of Royce Savage, Jert Grubb, and 
John Brett. Each speaker had twelve 
minutes in which to deliver his presenta- 
tion speech and six minutes to make his 
rebuttal. The coaches were for M.A.C., 
Professor Walter E. Prince and for the 
Univ. of Oklahoma, Professor Horner. 

The decision was rendered by a com- 
mittee of three men. The judges were 
Mr. William C. Dreher of Amherst, 
Professor Herbert P. Gallinger of Amherst 
College, and Professor George R. Taylor 
of Amherst College. 



Jugo-Slavs Give 

Novel Program 

Tamburica Orchestra Plays Many 
Operatic Selections. 



Five young men, who composed the 
Jugo-Slav Tamburica Orchestra, from 
the province of Croatia, in Jugo-Slavia, 
gave one of the most unusual programs 
last Wednesday evening which the Social 
Union has yet presented. They made a 
colorful picture in their white trousers 
and shirts, black boots, vests, and flow- 
ing ties, all of which were set off by 
scarlet scarfs around their waists. 

One of John Philip Sousa's famous 
marches was at the head of the program. 
After this stirring number the leader of 
the orchestra, which was composed of 
stringed instruments, gave a brief sketch 
of the country from which he and his 
companions come. He said that the 
province of Croatia is one of the most 
beautiful scenic spots in the world. At 
one place in Croatia there are fifteen 
(Continued on Page 3) 



Two Fraternities 

Hold House Parties 



Kappa Sigma and Q. T.V. Give 
Dances Following Middlebury Game. 



Dances were held by Q.T.V. and Kappa 
Sigma at their respective houses following 
the basketball game with Middlebury 
last Saturday. Grayson's Orchestra fur- 
nished music for twenty couples at the 
Q.T.V. house. The local chaperon was 
Mrs. Ostrander, and from Mt. Holyoke, 
Mrs. Hubbard. Refreshments were served 
by the house. 

Thirteen couples were present at the 
Kappa Sigma dance, which was in the 
nature of a Valentine party, with appro- 
priate decorations and favors. The 
chaperon from Mt. Holyoke was Mrs. 
Wheeler, while Miss Christopher was the 
local chaperon. Music was furnished by 
Eddie Haertl's Orchestra, and the cater- 
ing was done by Harry Till of Northamp- 
ton. 



STUDENTS TO HAVE 

PRACTICAL FARM WORK 



Farm Department Will Give Oppor- 
tunity for Practical Farming. 



Arrangements are being made by the 
Farm Department, under the direction 
(Continued on Pag* 2) 



The M.A.C. hockey team defeated the 
Army in a fast game at West Point last 
Wednesday. In spite of the snowstorm 
both teams put up a hard game. The 
playing was aggressive and was featured 
by good passing and sterling defense by 
Aggie. 

Heidner scored first for the Army near 
the end of the first period, and "Red'' 
Potter tied the score at the beginning of 
the second. The play during this session 
was entirely in West Point territory, the 
Army being held constantly in check by 
the superior defense work of the Agates. 
The winning goal came when "Buddy" 
Moberg took a pass from Forest and 
turned it in for the count, with about four 
minutes to play. 

Molierg and Forest starred on the 
offense for Aggie, their clever stickwork 
being a constant menace to the Army 
net. Abrahamson featured the defense, 
and stopped many West Point attempts 
to get into Aggie territory. Palmer 
played his usual good game at goal and 
made several clever stops. Some of the 
best ice encountered this season made 
the game much livelier. 

The summary: 

M.A.C. ARMY 

!-'■>■ t-.-it . lw rw, Moscatelli 

Moberg, c c, He iclntr 

Alir.ili.inisiiii. rw lw, Muutlt- 

Potter, 1<I rd, Daly 

Kreae, rd Id, Rain I 

r.iliuer. g g. Lewi* 

Sure MAC. 2. Army 1. Goals- -Potter. 

Motors, Heidner. Time — three l. r >-min. periods. 
Referee — M archand . 



Williams Defeat f d 

on ' s Own Floor 

Temple's Phenomenal Playing I ures 34—31 Victory of In- 
vincible Agrarians. Williams Ahead at Half Time. 



N. H. SEXTET BOWS 

TO AGGIE ICE TEAM 



M.A.C. to Have 
A Rifle Team 



R. O. T. C. Members will be Eligible 
for Squad. 



Plans are under way whereby M.A.C. 
as in previous years, is to be represented 
by a rifle team. The shooting gallery in 
the Drill Hall, which has been used for 
storing saddles during this winter, has 
been put in condition, so that practice 
is now possible, and a rifle team is being 
organized to compete next Spring in the 
contest for the William Randolph Hearst 
Trophy. Any member of the R.O.T.C. 
Unit is eligible for the team. Tryout will 
be held this week. 

Besides the contest mentioned above, 
it is hoped that other matches will be 
arranged with teams from different 
colleges. The local R.O.T.C. is also to 
be represented by a pistol team. A match 
has already been arranged with Norwich 
University, and other matches are pend- 
ing. Both the rifle and pistol teams will 
be coached by Sergeant Cronk. 



Mountain Scenes 

on Exhibition 



Collection of Photographs by Sella 
Shown in Memorial Building. 



Among the most majestic things in this 
world in which we live are the mountains 
that break the monotony of the landscape. 
Thanks to the work of one, Yittorio Sella, 
of Riella, Italy, some of the most beauti- 
ful mountain scenes in the Himalyas and 
the Caucasus have been preserved for 
posterity in the form of photographs. A 
collection of 38 of these remarkable 
photographs has been obtained by Prof. 
Frank A. Waugh, head of the Division of 
Horticulture, and is now on exhibition in 
the Memorial Building. These p ictures 
are "contact prints", i.e., made direct 
from large glass negatives, instead of 

being enlarged in the modern way. Some 
(Continued on Page 2) 



NOTICE 

The Pickwick C'ub will hold a 
meeting on Tuesday, February 
2.3, at 7 p. m., in (he Christian 
Association room in Norlli College. 
Dinny Ladas will talk on "Spirit- 
ualism." Everybody will be wel- 
come. 



Maroon and White Entertains Car- 
nival Guests by Beating Granite 
Staters, 3—1. 



Coach "Red" Ball's hockey team came 
through with their second victory of the 
week by defeating the University of New 
Hampshire sextet last Saturday by a 
score of 3 to 1. The game was played 
on the new rink at Durham In-fore | 
large crowd of Carnival guests. 

New Hampshire scored first on I shot 
by Percival, star center of the Granite 
Suite team, when the first period was 
about half over. "Joe" Forest W il d 
matters by stroking in a long shot from 
the side before the session ended. Capt. 
"Buddy" Moberg put Aggie in the lead 
with a goal on his own rebound in the 
next period, and Frese added another 
point in the final after taking a |>ass 
from Forest. "Dinty" Palmer made 
several good stops which saved the 
Agates more worry, but the playing in 
general was not up to the standard of 
the West Point game. 

This week will see the completion of 
the season if King Winter does not 
interfere. Tuesday the sextet meets the 
strong Williams team at Williamstown, 
(Continued on Page 2) 



AGATES TAKE FAST 
GAME FROM WESLEYAN 

Score Twelve Points Before Visitors 
Tally. Final Count is 34 — 16. 



The eighth consecutive victory for the 
Agates was made at the expense of the 
Wesleyan five in the Drill Hall last Fri- 
day evening, the score being 34 to 16, 
the highest score run up by the unbeaten 
Agrarians this year. Speed was the 
Agates greatest asset. With a bunch of 
Murchisons like those making up the 
M.A.C. quintet, it deserves to be un- 
beatable. 

Thomas started the scoring. A 12 to 
score was run up before Wesleyan could 
get into the scoring column at all. This 
lead was increased to fifteen before the 
period ended. In the second half, a large 
number of substitutes was used and the 
score was not increased as much in pro- 
portion, but the seconds proved a match 
for the Wesleyan team even so. The 
score between the halves was 20 to 5 
and the final count was 34 to 16. 

Temple again proved to be worthy 
material for honorable mention. His 
shooting was of high calibre, position 
and distance counting little in his ability 
to score. Griffin played in his customary 
flashy manner and Thomas filled Partcn- 
heimer's berth well. Partcnheimer was 
unable to play because of an ankle 
injury in the Williams game. 

The summary: 

M. A. C. WESLEYAN 

B. F. V. B. F. P. 

Temple If 6 12 PhiliiM.ru 

Thomas.rf 4 1 9 WooUton.lg 1 1 3 

Jvnm-n.rt O Lee.Jg 

Jones c Bradnhaw.c 2 4 

Smiley lit 113 Travin.c 

Kelso Ig O 1 1 Umplehy.rf 2 4 

Thompson.lg Vancott.rf I 

Griftin.rg I * « Jat k.lf 2 1 6 

Kane.rg J) 

Totals 14 6 34 Totals 7 2 16 

Referee— Tom Shea. Time — 20-min. halves. 



Freshmen Given 

Initial Set-Back 



Yearlings Lose to Deerfield in First 
Game Played Abroad. 



The Frosh lost a well played game to 
Deerfield Academy last Wednesday night 
at Deerfield. The Freshman quintel were 
at a disadvantage as it was the first 
away from home game. Despite this fact 
they outplayed their oppOBOttt who won 
only on their ability to sink long shots. 
The game was featured by the teamwork 
of both sides. Coffee and sandwiches were 
served the team after the game. The 
score was Deerfield 34, M.A.C. Freshmen 
26. 



The imlH-aten Agrarians cut another 
notch in their gun last Wednesday night, 
when they out scored a desperate Williams 
quintet, 34 to 31, at Williamstown. Tin- 
it. mi certainly played marvelous basket- 
ball and showed light enough to maintain 
their imstaitctl record even in the lace of 
a much stricter referee than usual, a 
much smaller court, and I team, roused 
Ix-yond its customary powers and deter- 
mined to l>eat the Agates, who have now 
taken three games out of four starts 
against the Koyal Purple. 

The team work of everyone who wore 
the Maroon and While, the Aggie light, 
and the phenomenal playing of Temple 
were all big factors that brought the 
Agates out on top. Coach (.ore said after 
the game, "Johnny won a place for him- 
self on the All- New England five ten 
times last night if he ever did before." 
His passing, his floor-work, his shooting, 
in fact, his every move helped to make 
him outstanding. His shooting was of 
such a calibre that the audience groaned 
whenever 'he got his hands on the ball. 
He scored on five out of six foul shots. 

The first half was characterized by 
continuous shooting and frequent fouls. 
The referee's whistle was blowing almost 
constantly, but so heated was the battle 
that the game seemed to be speeded up 
rather than the op|>ositc. Twelve |ht- 
sonal fouls wen- called against the Agates 
in the first |>ciiod which made them play 
in a state of siis|>ense that tan hardly lie 
imagined by one who did not teel it hint- 
sell. This situation should Ik- ascribed to 
a strict official rather than lo any unneces- 
sary roughness of the players. The 
Agates' defense was air-tight, however, for 
not a Williams basket was made from 
less than fifteen feet in the first period. 
Williams started with a 1 to I) lead but 
I'artenheimer scored on a cit and the 
(Continued on Pag* 2) 



MIDDLEBURY FIVE 
BEATEN, 16-14 

Long Shot by "Larry" Jones Gives 
Agates Margin of Victory In Closing 
Minutes. 



The Mass. Aggie quintet extended its 
unbroken string of victories to nine on 
Saturday afternoon by nosing out Middle- 
bury in the closest game of the season, 
the final score reading 16 to 14. "Larry" 
Jones played the stellar role in this 
triumph, for his long, one-handed shot 
came just one-minute and five seconds 
before the gun ended the game and broke 
the tie score of 14-all which was then 
existing. This victory enabled the Agates 
to equal the record of successive wins 
made by the Aggie All- Valley five b.itk 
in 1«>22. 

Moth teams showed the effects of a 
busy week, each having played two 
games, and the guarding was exception- 
ally close with considerable fouling and 
bodily contact. The ability of the M.A.C. 
team to capitalize the larger number of 
foul tries awarded them s|xlled the 
difference between victory and defeat. 
At no time did the floor-work of the 
Agates approach the rare perfection 
which characterized the game with 
Wesleyan the night before. During the 
first half the passing was erratic, and the 
players seemed too eager to score. Time 
after time an Aggie man would cut for 
the basket and take a short pass from a 
team-mate only to find himself past the 
hoop before he could shoot. 

"Blondie" Thomas opened the scoring 
with a follow-in shot, and those two 
(Continued on Page 2) 



OPPONENTS' SCORES 



Tufts 25, Middlebury 20 
1$. I. a, Middlebury 28 
Conn. Aggie 31, Maine 26 
Springfield 43, Norwich 10 
Holy Cross 42, li I M 
Springfield 32, Vermont 29 
W. P. I. 21, Brown 18 
Harvard 40, Williams 29 



1 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 17, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 17. 1926 



Til MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Oftci»l newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Mast T. Boyd '26 Editor-in-Chief 

Jqmx T. Lammst 26 Managing Editor 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial M*»» T " ^^ ™ 

Cldtr Press Ma.v T. Boyd 26 

Athletics William L. Dole 27 

Harold L. Clark 28 

L. Rockwell Smith. Jr. '2« 

Campus News Ernest L. Spencer 28 

Ellsworth Barnard 28 

Edward H. Nichols, '29 

William R. Phinnby, '29 

Co-Ed News Frances C. Bruce '27 

Alumni Josephine Paniica 28 

Faculty Newt W. Gordon Hunter 29 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

AiYiN G. Stevens '26 Business Manager 

Charles P. Reed '26 Advertising Manager 

Lewis H. Whitaeer '27 Circulation Manager 

■» John E. White '27 

Douglas W. Loring '28 

Charles F. Clagg "27 

Edwin A. Wilder '28 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Port Office Accepted for mailinn at special tate 
of"po.Uge provided for in section 1103 Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



Prussianized Journalism 

The campus today b. generally speak- 
ing, a place for the suppression, not tin- 
expression, of student individualism. This 
particularly applies to student editors, 
who are not permitted to voice student 
opinion, but obliged to echo the dicta of 
the college authorities. Free speaking, 
in at least ten colleges this past year, has 
been followed by enforced resignation of 
the editors. This makes for a curious 
situation with "the freedom of the press" 
reduced to an absurdity. 

The editor of the Daily Lariat of Baylor 
I'niversity is the latest victim— dispps- 
ptawd because he wrote an editorial con- 
demning play censorship by the local 
board of CCSaon. rk voiced student 
opinion, lie is no longer editor. 

In California a young man is dispos 
Mssed because an article is deemed "ir- 
reverant"; in Boston a girl is forced to 
resign because she "ridicules" the K.O. 
T.C.; in South Carolina an editor is mis 
pearled from college tor daring to critkiac 
a matter of college policy. There are 
many other instances which might be 
cited. Straws, if you will, but straws 
have an interesting habit of showing up 

the wind. 

If college authorities publicly plead for 
the (le\elopinent of individualism, the 
cultivation of the power of independent 
thought, and then promptly punish any 
manifestation of it— what's the answer? 
By all means think independently, say 
they in effect, as long as your thoughts 
are perfectly in accord with accepted 
conventionalities, and as long as you say 
nothing that might remotely be construed 
as harmful to your college. Tell t he- 
truth, but never the whole truth — only 
that politic portion of the truth approved 
for publication. 

The Sword of Damocles is no time-worn 
legend — it is a present actuality, swinging 
precariously over the head of he who 
writes, be he student, student editor, or 
faculty. As we said, a curious situation, 
but yet not too curious, considering the 
spirit of the times. A Western I'niversity 

recently prepared a q uesti o n naire for its 

some thousands of students, and asked 
them "Why do you think a college edu- 
cation is valuable?", and in the answer 
li.s the answer to most of the vexed 
campus questions of today, for almost 
invariably the students wrote down: 
"Because I'll be able to earn more money." 
There you have it. Money. Do as 
you are told, and you will be valuable — 
think for yourself and you will lose your 
job. Criticism costs money — therefore, 
let us have no criticism. "Money is the 
root of all evil" is an old saying; as far 
as the American campus of today is con- 
cerned, that is all too true, for with 
money comes fear, and with fear, sup- 
pression . 

Q. E. D. 



automatons with human capabilities. 
They are useful and industrious, the 
Robots, and if they had no |K>sitive 
human virtues, at least they had no 
human vices. For example, a Robot 
audience, if somewhat uninspiring, would 
at least remain in place until the con- 
clusion of an entertainment. While we — 
In the cities, of course, it is quite the 
thing to stroll out in the middle of an 
act — the |K-rformer may make some 
comment and cause some laughter (in 
New York the favorite is "Well, if you 
will live in Jersey"), but neverthless it is 
done, and often. Here an entertainment 
is, comparatively speaking, a rare event. 
We are not forced to go — we go presum- 
ably l>ecause we wish to. And we go in 
on our Activity tickets. Other people do 
not, and they at least would like their 
money's worth of show, unbroken by 
student parade up the aisles. 

Must we then display our urban sophis- 
tication quite so prominently? 

We gave a disgraceful exhibition at 
this last Social Union. The object, of 
COUrae, was to get good seats at the 
basketball game, following the good old 
American pastime of "Beat your neigh- 
bor to it," so well displayed at popular 
movies, baseball games, and bargain 
sales. Still, there are plenty of seats in 
the old Drill Hall, and it is questionable 
if the disturbance, the gross rudeness to 
both audience and performers, was at all 
justified by the motive. 

As to the performers — we offend | 
disheartening insult to them. To enter- 
tainers the realization that they cannot 
hold an audience cuts deep, and we forced 
such a realization on them. They came 
lure and gave us their best; and we 
rewarded them by clattering out to get 
I good seat for the next entertainment. 
Thoughtless, to say the least, and un- 
worthy of our Aggie traditions. Perhaps 
the entertainers, and certainly those 
enjoying the entertainment, would have 
preferred Robots to Agates. 

Not even a Robot would be so rude. 
He couldn't. We shouldn't. 




AT THE ABBEY 



3 



STUDENTS TO HAVE 

(Continued from I'ufte 1) 
of Mr. Enos J. Montague, the head of the 
department, to give an opportunity for 
pra ctical farm work, during the summer 
months, in the various branches of agri- 
culture. The plan calls for the student 
agreeing to give full service during cer- 
tain Spectfiad months, and to receive the 
same rate of pay as men of like ability 
receive. The college, on its part, agrees 
to give the student practice in handling 
animals and in operating machines of 
various kinds and in performing the more 
unusual and difficult farm operations. 

The number of students to Ik- accom- 
modated is limited. Students of low- 
scholarship grade will not be accepted. 
Applications should !»e submitted in the 
near future to Mr. Montague. 



Men's Rights! 

We quote from the New Student — 
"Professor Ira B. Cross of the Univ. 
of California may be long remembered 
as a champion of the rights of men. 
Annoyed at the feminine students who 
jxjwdered their noses in class, he invited 
the men of the class to do likewise. 
Consequently two men appeared in 
class armed with Gillettes, lather and 
brushes. After class had opened they 
lathered and shaved. Professor Cross 
promised to award both of the men A's 
for their term's work in recognition of 
their bravery in defense of the rights 
of man." 

CP 

About the Weather 
We hereby wish to make it known that 
we take back any and all requests for 
snow. In the future we are not respon- 
sible for what the weather man slings at 
us. 

Incidentally you may recall that we 
suggested that the Grounds Dept. might 
do something toward tinting the excessive- 
ly white wastes that encumber this garden 
spot in the Connecticut Valley. The 
weather man absorlied this one too, 
(The power of the Press — even the Cider 
Press?), and sent down a quarter inch of 
red-tinted snow. In Minneapolis, it's 
true, but what's a mere matter of locale 
compared to the principle of the thing? 
Meteorologists say that the red color 
is due to desert dusts suspended in the 
high air until driven down by the snow. 
We have decided not to do our touring 
by air in the vicinity of Minneapolis. 

CP 

Oy, Oy ! 
Aggie Ed-ucated Damsel (at the Hash 
House on the Day we had Oysters) — 1 
like them smocked, don't you? 

The Table— Do it over again. You like 
'em how? 

The Ag-Ed — Smocked. Fixed up with 
crumbs and things like this — 

A Home-Ec (very su|>erior) — Ah — you 
mean scalloped. 

The Ag-Ed — Oh, — well, I knew it 
had something to do with embroidery 
anyhow! 

Swift Curtain. 

CP 



CO-ED NOTES 

Another in the series of Delta Phi teas 
was held in the Abbey living room last 
Wednesday afternoon. As usual, it was 
converted to a bridge-tea by the bridge- 
enthusiasts. 

M 

Anne Hinchey ex'29 was visiting at the 
Abbey this last week-end. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



ROISTER DOISTERS 

A shake-up has occurred during the 
past week in the cast of the Prom 6how, 
"She Stoops to Conquer". Emery Loud 
'26 will be unable to take part because of 
ineligibility and Thomas Campion '28 
has withdrawn from college. Their parts 
will be filled by Maxwell H. Goldberg '28 
and James Sheridan '29. 



'24 Nandor Porges has accepted a 
|M>sition as assistant chemist with the 
Larrow Milling Co. at Rossford, aeai 
Toledo, Ohio. He is under head chemist, 
George K. Redding '20. 

'17 Richard L. Holden has bees 
appointed field representative of tin 
American Guernsey Cattle Club in the 
south central states. He has been mana K 
ing editor of the Guernsey Breeder,' 
Journal for nearly four years, during 
which time that publication has had u 
unprecedented period of prosperity. lb- 
leaves it with its highest circulation in 
its history. 



Those who are taking part in the 
annual Prom Show, "She Stoops to 
Conquer", went over to Northampton 
last week to see John Galsworthy's, 
"Loyalties" played by the Northampton 
Re|>ertory Company. Prof, and Mrs. 
Frank Prentice Rand were the guests of 
the evening. In connection with the 
Prom Show there has been a change in 
the cast. James Sheridan '29 will take 
the part which Thomas Campion '28 was 
to have filled. 



JUNIOR PROM PLANS 

NEARING COMPLETION 



MOUNTAIN SCENES 
(Continued from Page 1) 

thousands of these photographs were made 
in various parts of the world. The present 
collection is loaned by the Appalachian 
Mountain Club and forms a realistic and 
unusual representation of high mountain 
scenery. These pictures will remain on 
exhibition for another week. 



The 1927 Junior Prom Committee ii 
still engaged in arranging the program 
for what promises to be the best Prom 
ever held at the college. Music is si ill 
being held up, but bids are being con 
sidered from some of the leading ore In ~ 
tras in the East, among them the famous 
"Lehigh Six" from Lehigh University, 
Roy Stewajtsons' Russian Amber Room 
Orchestra of Boston, Worthy Hill's team 
of Hartford, and the Barbary Coast. 

As announced before, the Prom dun e 
will be held on a Friday night; Prom 
show and house dances being held on the 
first night, Thursday. Something in the 
way of ultra-novelty is being prootised 
to take the place of Prom Cabaret. 



N. H. SEXTET BOWS 
(Continued from Page 1) 

and Thursday they encounter Amherst 
on the Aggie rink in the deciding game 
of the town series, the first contest having 
resulted in a scoreless tie. The summary: 

M. A. C. N. H. 

Forest. Swan, lw rw, Dearimtton 

Frese, c c, Percival 

Moberg. rw hr. Irle 

Potter, Id rel. Vatter. Chandler 

Abrahamson, rd Id. Fud«<- 

Palmer, g 8. Blewett 

Score— MAC. :i. N.H. 1. Goals— Forest. 
Moberg, Frese. Percival. Referee—Murphy 
Goal umpires — Broderick. Rice. Tinier— Morrison. 
Time — three 15-min. periods. 



Not Even A Robot — 

Not even a Robot would do it. He 
couldn't. We shouldn't. 

Robots, you will remember, are the 
sublimated Frankenstein's monsters of 
the exotic play "R. U. R." They are 



MIDDLEBURY FIVE 

(Continued from Page I) 

points represented the largest interval 
which stood between the rivals during 
the entire contest. Two baskets by 
Knowles, one by R. Rice, and a foul shot 
by H. Rice comprised the total of Middle- 
bury's scoring in the first half. Griffin 
secured the remaining M.A.C. counters, 
his double-decker and three baskets from 
the free-throw line contributed enough to 
knot the score at 7-all as the first session 
ended. 

Middlebury tallied first in the second 
half on a floor-basket by R. Rice, and 
Captain "Johnny" Temple came back 
for Aggie with two perfect attempts from 
the foul line. Griffin and Partenheimer 
each added a single point, but Knowles 
sank a long one and placed the teams 
even again, "Ray" Smiley then found 
the ring after a rebound from the back- 
board, but Knowles counted again. With 
the election suspended , "Larry" proceeded 
to toss in his remarkable throw which won 
the game. 

"Larry's" activities were not confined 
to this single attempt, however, for his 
defensive play and interception of DM 
was the best shown by any member of 
the Aggie team. The Middlebury hoop- 
sters displayed an aggressive man-to- man 
defense which forced their opponents 
down the floor repeatedly in the second 
half. Knowles, who possessed an uncanny 
eye for the net, and R. Rice featured 
for the visitors. The score: 

M. A. C. MIDDLEBURY 

B. K P B. F. P. 

Temple.lf :i •'* R. Rice.ru 2 4 

Thomas. rf 1 2 Hasseltie'.lg 

Partenhcimer.rf 1 1 Knowles.c 4 8 

Jones c 1 2 Palmer ,rf 1 1 

Smiley .Is 1 8 W. Rice.lf 1 1 

Griftin.ru 1 4 6 Towne.lf 

Totals 4 S 16 Totals r, 2 14 

Referee— Johnson. Time — 20-min. halves. 



"Women are Distractions" 

If you've ever gone early to an Aggie 
basketball game, and found a scat with 
a — reasonably — good view, and watched 
the Noah's Ark Parade of the student 
and his girl, two by two, and two by two, 
and so on ad infinitum, you will appre- 
ciate the ruling of a certain western 
university where the sheep and the goats 
are inexorably divided, where there are 
severe penalties for sitting with a girl at 
a game (the reason given is that a 
"woman's only a woman", and a dis- 
traction at that, while a good game is 
a game.) 

Be that as it may, the rule is enforced, 
and publicly if necessary by duly appoin- 
ted monitors. How fortunate for the 
Agates that the "certain Valley" made up 
its glacial mind to locate itself in the 
Fast ! 

CP 



How to Stand 
For Happy Half Hours 
on the Aggie Campus 

1. Stand in front of the Chem. Lab. 
and watch our local dare-devils hang 
out the top floor windows and spear snow- 
off the roofs with old curtain poles and 
broom handles. The snow splashes on 
the stones below— and if you're lucky 
you'll see it hit an unsuspecting Frosh 
coming out of the front door at just the 
right time. 

2. Stand at the west entrance to Hash 
on a thawing night when the steps are 
coated with ice, and watch the students 
start wildly on their homeward ways. 

3. Stand in front of the Abbey and 
watch our winter sports come down the 
ski slide. There are always a few who 
snobbishly insist on coming down on their 
feet, but most of them stick to the good 
old Stagger-and-Fall method, coming 
down preferably on one ear and one 
shoulder, or worse. There are two main 
classes of these Ski-Sliders — those whose 
skiis perversely insist on toeing out, and 
those whose skiis invariably and dis- 
astrously toe in. The result is the same 
for either class. 

CP 

And that's that! 



WILLIAMS DEFEATED 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 
lead was increased to 5-1 before the 
Purple scored again. Three times the 
home team regained the advantage and 
twice the Agates fought to the top again, 
a foul shot immediately before the gun 
preventing the Agates from holding the 
upper hand lx>tween the halves. 

However, the Agrigation took the 
heavy end of the score at the outset of 
the second period when Temple scored 
twice. The Agates defense was not as 
tight in this period as in the first but they 
maintained the lead to the end of the 
game. In this period Thomas proved to 
be a dark horse by tossing jn three 
baskets in a row when he replaced Parten- 
heimer, the latter having turned his ankle 
severely. Later in the period he substi- 
tuted for Smiley another position to 
which he is unaccustomed and in this 
l>erth he continued to be an asset. The 
most dramatic moments of the game came 
in the final fifty seconds. With the count 
.i'2 to 31, Williams became fiendish. 
They cut fast and failed to score, Mur- 
dough recovered ami Griffin cut under the 
basket but so rapidly was he going that 
he failed. Aoother exchange in a similar 
manner and Thomas again cut under to 
meet a similar fate. With the seconds 
rapidly flying Williams launched another 
attack for the winning points and failed. 
Finally, with Partenheimer under the 
basket, the ball was passed through 
again and the tall forward looped it 
through just as the final gun went off. 

For Williams, Wirth was outstanding 
with three baskets from mid-court and 
four fouls out of five to his credit. He was 
in every play and displayed the attitude 
of the home team as much as any. 
The summary: 



M.A.C. 

B 

Temple.lf 5 

Partenheimer ,rf 3 
Thomas.rf 
Jones.c 
Murdough.lb 
G i itVin.lt) 
Smiley ,rb 
Thomas.rb 



F. P. 

4 14 



WILLIAMS 

B. F. 



1 
4 


1 





7 

S 











WriKht.rb 

Cook.lb 

Sterling.lb 

Zinn.c 

Wirth, rf 

Callahan.rf 

Bogary.lf 

Brown.lf 



1 
1 


I 
I 

i 

2 

i) 



Totals 13 8 34 Totals 9 ISM 

Score at half time— Williams 18. M.A.C. 17 
Referee— Sullivan. Time— 20-min. halves. 



MANY AWARDS MADE 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

certicates: Philip H. Couhig '26 ol 
Beverly, Linus A. Gavin '26 of Natick, 
Alton H. Gustafson '26 of Campcllo, 
Joseph R. Hilyard '27 of Beverly, Herbert 
E. Moberg '26 of Brockton, Donald C 
Sullivan '26 of Amherst, and George II. 
Thurlow '26 of West Newbury. A 
manager's certificate and sweater wen 
awarded to Francis W. Warren L' 
Stow. 

Certificates and gold track shoes \ 
given to the following members of the 
cross country team: Captain Herbert F. 
Bartlett '26 of West Springfield, Cl.n 
A. Crooks '27 of North Brooksfield. .ml 
Harry C. Nottebaert '27 of Lexington. 

Sweaters, certificates, and gold track 
shoes were awarded to Raphael A. Biros 
'27 of Amesbury, Frederick W. Swan '-' 
of Milton, and Ellsworth II. Wheeler '% 
of Bolton. Gold track shoes were reo 
by Llewellyn L. Derby, coach, James 1 
Greenaway '27 of Springfield, man 
and Charles P. Preston '2K of Danvc i> 

Gold medals for work in the various 
academic activities were given to Mary T. 
Boyd '26 of Ontega, Florida, for work on 
the Collegian and Index; to Harry 1 
Fraser '26 of Jamaica Plain, for work in 
the Musical Clubs and on the Index; 
to John F. Lambert '26 of Gleasondale, 
for work on the Collegian and /"<*« 
and in the Musical Clubs; to Roy E- 
Norcross '26 of Brimfield, for work in 
the Musical Clubs; to Charles P. Reed 
'26 of West Bridgewater, for work on the 
Collegian and Index; and to Alvin & 
Stevens '2ti of Needham, for work on the 
Collegian and in the Musical Clubs. 
Silver medals were awarded to Marguerite 
R. Bosworth '26 of Holyoke, for work in 
the Roister Doisters; to Duncall % 
Hollingworth '26 of Providence, R. I.. for 
work in the Roister Doisters and in * 
Musical Clubs; and to Veasey Peine > 
of Dorchester, for work on the Index- 

Certificates were given to the following 
men for work in the judging teams: fruit 
judging, Lewis M. Van Alstyne '-'' ■ 
Kinderhook, N. Y., Herbert r. BartW 
18 of West Springfield, Roy E. NorcrWj 
'26 of Brimfield, and Ray G. Smile) 
of Worcester; dairy products and cat* 
judging, William K. Budge '26 of Matt* 
pan, Preston J. Davenport '26 of 5k* 
burne Falls, Albert I. Mann '26 of Dak* 
and Donald R. Williams '26 of NorthW* 
live stock judging, Carl- A. Fraser *• 
Westborough, Elliot K. Greenwood ■ 
of Hubbardston, Cary D. Palmer '» 
Grafton, Vt., Edwin L. Tucker »• 
Baldwinville, and Francis W. Warren ■ 
of Stow; floriculture judging, Raymond t- 
Smith '26 of Salem, Loren F. SnittVn ■ 
of Westport, Conn., and GeoW 
Thurlow '26 of West Newbury; P» u,,r) 
judging, Robert C. Ames '27 of V'" 1 ^ 
Haven, Leonid A. Krassovsky -' 
Russia, William H. Perkins '27 of CIm» 
pee, and Montague White '26 of ^ e 
Hartford, Conn. 



jCKEY-FREEMAN Give you a new delight in the SS 
Clothes - - clothes you wear ww3. 



The Best In Drug Store Merchandise 
The Best in Drug Store Service 
HENRY ADAMS ft COMPANY 

Th* %e*aJ UL Storm 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 



IS AT 



DRURY'S 

College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



TWO YEARS WIN TWO 

OUT OF THREE GAMES 



Close Guarding Features Two 
Victories by Shorthorns. 



The Two Years won two out of the 
three games played last week winning 
from Northampton Commercial College 
and Clarke School and losing to Drury 
Academy. 

The game with Commercial was slow 
and was marked by the defensive work 
of both teams. Holland was high scorer 
for the Aggie men. The final score was 
24-18 in favor of the Two Years. 

Drury Academy was too fast for the 
Aggie quintet beating them 36-14. Hol- 
land was again high scorer for the Two 
Years. F. Senelly played a fast game 
for Drury. 

Clarke School was beaten after a close 
game. The game was featured by the 
good lloor work and defense of the M.A.C. 
team. Ryan was high scorer for the Two 
Years. 



WINCHESTER 

porting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



he Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



JUGO-SLAVS GIVE NOVEL 
(Continued from Page 1) 

lakes which are all joined together. On 
the edges of these lakes may Ik- found 
the palaces and cast Irs of nearly every 
emperor in the world. 

It would be hard to pick out any one 
number on the program which was more 
(popular than any other, because all were 
equally applauded. Several solos sung by 
the leader of the orchestra, accompanied 
by the orchestra, were vary popular. An 
unusual number was a dance by one of 
the musicians which looked even more 
strenuous and BOOM as intricate as the 
Charleston. The program was largely 
made up of selections from famous Operas 
and selections of native Croatian •OOgS 
and dances. Nearly all of the encores 

were popular pieces. 



NORTHAMPTON 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 



THIS WEEK 

Paul llansell presents 

The Hortbampton Repertory Company 

In 

"Outward Bound" 

SUTTON VANES ARRESTING FANTASY 
OK THE BEYOND 

"A ringing and startling play" 

Alexander Woolcott 

"Food for the Fundamentalists and food 
for the Modernists. It will be generously 
visited and bitterly debated." 

—N. Y. Evening World 

Evenings at 8.15 Sat. Mat. at 2.16 

Next Week -"THE DOCTOR'S DILEMMA" 

By Bernard Shaw 
■Special Matinee, Feb. 22. 



TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lsmhda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 3258 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

We still have a good assortment of skates, 
skis and Snow Shoes. Anyone purchasing 
a pair of skates at this store will receive 
one sharpening free. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 




WMGLEYS 



NEW HANDY PACK 

Fits hand •» 
pocket and purse 

More for your money 
end the best Peppermint 
Chewing Sweet for any money 

Lock for Wrigley's P. K. Handy Pack 
gf. on your Dealer's Counter at 



JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 

DAVID GRAYSON'S BOOKS 

Autographed 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

Daily Necessities— Hair Brushes and Combs, Toilet Soap, 
Tooth Brushes antl Paste. Tweezers, Nail Files. 

TOILET REQUISITES OF ALL KINDS 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST \ DEACON. Propi. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 



The Secret of How This Graduate 

Made a Five Figure Income 

In Five Years 




LIVED in Newark, Ohio. 

His folks wanted him to go into 
some business around home. 

Wasn't a thing in the town that he 
wanted to drudge along in. 

Figured that having spent four 
years at college, he didn't exactly 
cotton to tying himself down to 
"just a job." 

Neither did he want to go into his 
father's old business. 

So you see, it was the same old 
story so many of you college fellows 
have to have sooner or later. 

Being a red blooded, two fisted 
kind of a fellow, with lots of pep 
and go, he wanted to get into some- 
thing where he wouldn't have to keep 
all bottled up. 




Looked around a lot during his 
college days, and finally decided he 
would build some greenhouses and 
grow lettuce and tomatoes. 

From the very start he made money. 

That was 11 or so years ago. 

Now he and his Dad have a fine 
residence on top of a hill, and from 
their porch now look down on acres 
and acres of greenhouse -covered fields 
of lettuce and tomatoes. 

Both of them are having the time 
of their life. 

If Carl Wciant of Newark, Ohio 
can do all this, so can you. 

We'll build you the greenhouses 
and help you in every little detail of 
getting started. 

V.'rite us. Let's gt-t the idea work* 
ing and plans started. 



1/ interested untc to the Manager of our Service Department, Ulmer 
Building, Cleveland, Ohio; who will gn* it his personal attention. 



jot^&Jfognham^a 




FREE 
CRANK CASE 

SERVICE for 
FOUNTAIN PENS 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

(SUPPLY LIMITED) 

The New College Store 



M BUILDING 



SPECIAL THINGS 

for 
Special Students 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 

No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mann 

Our Laundry First <:!«•• 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OP 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite Poet Office 



HE DAILY DOZEN — 



"ep ^ up and meet tVenT One £en" Overcoat, tat. and they are ft o.n ft at half-price. They're no, Hke cold storage eg*,, they are fre.h 
Now Ia y„nr chance! CARL H. BOLTER HVANN1S 

AMHERST 



EXETER 



Town Hall, Amherst 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 17, 1926 



Wed. 

Thurs. 

l.ee. 

7.30 



May Murray and Francis X. 
Huiihman in 
"TIIK MASKKI) BRIM-:" 
A gorgeous, colorful screen 
play of Paris that will keep 
you thrilled to the end. 
New* Fable* Comedy 



YE AGGIE INN 



R D Sawyer, 1926 Manager. 4 or 5 students from freshman, sophomore and junior classes wanted 

y Steady Work. Apply before March 1 to R. D. Sawyer, 



Friday 



4.45. 8.M 



Saturday 

3.M 

• 45 8 3t 



Virginia 
A 



Valll, Eugene 
O'Brien In 

•S1RGE" 
from the novel by Samuel 
Hopkins Adams and ran as 
a serial In Collier's Mary 
Alden. Marc McDermott and 
Spottawoode Aiken In the 
cant. „ 

HiKlge Podge Comedy 



Hoot Gibson, Helen Fergu- 
son and Robert McKIm In 
"THE SPOOK RANCH" 
Replete with crashing action 
haunting mystery, thunder- 
ous riding »nd nerve- tickling 

thrill*. 

News Comedy 



Mon. 

3.00 
• 45 8.30 



WASHINGTON'S BIRTH- 
DAY 
Colleen Moore. Lloyd 
Hughe*. Leon Errol, Eva 
Novak and Myrtle Stedman 
in "SALLY" 

Flo Zlegfeld'* biggest Broad 
way hit. There may never be 
another Sally. Don't mis* It! 
Pathe Review Comedy 



n 

s 



You will And an excellant 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP . . . 
equipped with the most up-to-date Goodyear 
^ Machinery and a modern 

SHOE SHINING '\RLOR 

at Hi Amlty-St.. - Labrovltt Block 

We understand your requirements and are pr»- 

pared to meet your needs. 

A U work guaranteed. Shoes shined and dyed. 

VIN CENT GRANDONICO, Prop. 

Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the beat In everything 



FACULTY MEMBERS 

ENJOY NOVEL PARTY 



Folk Songs and Dances Feature 
Second Faculty Party. 




NEW 
HANDKERCHIEFS 

Sport or Dainty Ones 



All Academics Activities managers 
who have desks in Room 7 in the Mem- 
orial Building should see Professor Rand 
immediately if they desire to get desk 
keys. The desks will be locked after 
the end of this week. 



THE NEW IDEAS IN 

FOOTWEAR 

are now on display at 
Holyoke's largest Shoe Store 

THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



275 High St. 



Holyoke 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up on* flight) 

Oculists Prtscrlptlons FUUd. Broken Ihum 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCES and ©the* 

reliable makes 



Over one hundred people were present 
at a party held by the faculty in the 
Memorial Building Saturday evening, 
January 30. The program for the evening 
contained several interesting features. 
Mrs. Arthur B. Beaumont, dressed in 
colonial costume, sang several old-time 
songs. Professor A. A. Mackimmie in- 
troduced an unusual type of entertain- 
ment, spoken songs; that is, songs recited 
to musical accompaniment. The entire 
assembly joined in singing several folk 
songs. Two folk dances were given by 
Mrs. Curry S. Hicks and Dr. George E. 
Gage, and Mrs. Hicks also gave a clog 
dance. The party was in charge of Dr. 
and Mrs. Charles E. Marshall. Mrs. 
Marshall also acted as accompanist. The 
refreshment committee consisted of Mrs. 
Clarence E. Gordon, Miss Edna L. 
Skinner, and Miss Helen Knowlton. 

This was the second of a series of three 
faculty parties, the first of which was 
given during the fall term. 



W. N. Craig, President of the Boston 
Gardeners' and Florists* Club, will speak 
to the Floriculture students on Tuesday, 
Feb. 23, in French Hall at 2.45 p. m. His 
talk will be on "My Impressions of British 
Floriculture." 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

HDNS1NGWEAR and MEDALIA 
SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $1.39 $1.75 



FACULTY 

Dr. Henry T. Fernald, head of tht 
De|>artment of Entomology, has recast!) 
named and returned a collection of dig^ 
wasps sent to him by the Canada* 
government for classification. Dr. Fern- 
aid has studied these creatures for years 
and has what is probably the lar K <,. 
collection of them in the world. They are 
of economic importance as they have ar, 
interesting habit of paralizing souk- type, 
of destructive insects, and then burying 
them in the ground and laying an sag „ r 
top of them, so that the young wasp af 
have enough to eat when it is hatched 



COLLEGE SHOES 

— AT — 

TOWN PRICES 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Wait 

NEW PRICES 

Mens Whole Soles. Rubber Heels - - • SJ.9S 

Mens Half Soles. Rubber Heels - • • »•*» 

Mens Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels - • *•*» 

Mens Half Soles »•*• 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOUSE 

Open till 8 P. M. 



G. Edward Fisher 



We have just received another larp 
assortment of OVERSHOES at different | 
prices. Avoid being too late. 

Hosiery a Specialty 
JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 









Tuxedo Suits 

We are showing a very fine quality 

| hand tailored tuxedo that is going 

fast at $40 

We can show you the latest in dress ac- 
cessories of all kinds and save you money 
on them all. New arrivals in Suits and 
Topcoats that will look good to you. 



F. M. Thompson & Son 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



When thi 

straight-8 

blows 

a shoe 




44 



BOSTONIANS" 

STRICTLY 
COLLEGE SHOES 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET 



AMHERST 



BEFORE you even look for the jack or tire- 
tools, tuck a neat wad of Prince Albert into the 
muzzle of your jimmy-pipe. Light up • . . and 
get yourself in the frame of mind where a flat 
tire is "all in the day's work." Talk about a 
gloom-chaser! 

P. A. simply knocks troubles for a row of 
planished-steel mudguards. Its cool, soothing 
smoke percolates into your system, the sun 
crashes through the clouds, and everything is 
hotsy-totsy. Yes indeed, Fellows, Prince Albert 
is great tobacco. 

And paste this in the fly-leaf of your the- 
saurus: P. A. can't bite your tongue or parch 
your throat, no matter how hard you hit it up. 
The Prince Albert process flunked Bite and 
Parch on their first examination. Get a tidy red 
tin of P. A. now and see. 

>RINGE ALBERT 

— no other tobacco is like it! 



P. A. it told everywhere if 
tidy red tint, Pound and halt' 
pound tin humidors, ant 
pound crystal-glass humidors 
with sponge • moistener top. 
And always with every bit of 
bite and parch removed by 
the Prince Albert procett. 




© 1926, R. J. RwnoldsTobstcs 
Company. Winston-Salem, N. C. 



SPRING HEADQUARTERS— . ,„, ,. AtM 

Right here at your service you can find as exclusive an array of spring merchandise as the most fastidious could, des 
It is to your advantage to do your spring trading at 



SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAUL! 



usttt i 
)26 



Slfo jfflaHgarijitHgttg Qtalljrfmt 



Vol. xxxvi. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEB. 24, 1926 



No. 18 



Delta Phi Gamma Prom 

Whole Week-End 



Co-Eds Put on Biggest Affair of Its Kind 

Ever Attempted at M. A. C. 



The long looked for week-end MM 
Halted off MOfC than sun ess fully l>> a 

Valentine formal, given by Delta PM 

Gamma in the Memorial Building from 
tiw thirty to one, Friday, Feb. 19. The 

cbaperoaea, fcfhn Edna 1- Skinner, Miss 
Margaret Hamlin, Mrs. Carry Hicks, 

and Mrs. William Machmer wen- assisted 
in the receiving Una by Miss Marion 
( ,i-M(ly, chairman of the dance coat 
auttee, with Frederick Bartlett and Miee 

Margaret Shea, President of Delta Phi 
Gamma with Albert Mann. The music 
an tarnished by "Eddie" llaertl's Coq 
|l'ur orchestra. The sup|x>r was served 
|,v Mi>s Diet her in Draper Hall at eight 
o'clock. Red candles and flowers and vary 
clever ami original heart ahaped diehaa 
■atiaaed every poaaible whim for a 
Valentine occasion. There were a few 
mil -nf-town guests adding their enjoy- 
ment to that of the forty couples from 
the campus. The hall was decorated most 
originally with silhouettes of dancing 
figure* on the curtains. Rose lights and 
|io\ woods decorated with hearts carried 
out the Valentine theme. The loggia and 
three rooms down stairs were furnished 
for the use of the guests 

following the basketball game on 
Saturday. Delta PM ('.annua proceeded 
to Hill's Memorial Woman's Club House 
in Amherst where a Tea Dance was held 
until nine o'clock, cha|xroned by Mrs. 
Marie B. Marsh and Mrs Prank P. Rand 
Sunday night a sleighride, cha|H-roned by 
Mi-- Sadie Parley, enjoyed wattles and 
chicken at the Brick Oven in Hadley. 

The whole week-end was pronounced 

by all who attended as the beat affair 
ever pal on at Agg i e either by tan co-eds 

or by the school committee*. The com- 
mittee in charge was Marion Cassidy, 

ili.u, .in. Dorothy Chapman, Elisabeth 
Laanterand Dorothy Leonard. 



Musical Clubs Leave 

for Eastern Mass 



Four Concerts in Three Days Sched- 
uled for Musicians. 



The MAC Musical Clube lease 

Thursday morning OH their tour of 

(■stern Massachusetts, making the trip 

in two large busses. Their Brat stop will 

be at Rutland, Thursdav a fter no on , 

ehm they will ghfe a concert lor the 

it the sanatorium. Tint evening 

they will perform in Holden, and the 

owing day they will journey to Stow. 

lay night will find them in Aubtirn- 

and on Sunday afternoon they will 

n turn to Amherst. 

a her concerts have as yet been 
-1 for the Aggie musician-, but 
mi nts are being made lor several 
The men will probably not per- 
form in Amherst until High School Day. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



'Worry is as useless as it is In 

people not to worry" Anon. 



Univ. of Maine, 

fternoon; 



Thursday — 
\ sr-.it \- Debate 
there. 

Club: Rutland 
Holden. evening. 
Friday— 

ty Basketball: Maine, here, 
rstty Debate: Colby, there. 
lnterfraternity Basketball: Theta 
Chi vs. Q.T.V.; Sigma Phi Kpsilon 
vs. Delta Phi Alpha. 
Glee (Tub: Stow. 
Saturday — 
■* p. m. Varsity Debate in Memorial 

Kuilding: Bates College, 
lnterfraternity Basketball: La mbd a 
Chi Alpha vs. Kolony Klub; 
Kappa Kpsilon vs. A.T.C.. 
< 'lee Club: Auburndale. 
Sunday — 
!l i m. Chapel. Sermon by Pres. 
I'aul D. Moody, Middlebury 
College, Middlebury, Vt. 
^•dnesday — 
Varsity Basketball: Tufts, there. 



DEBATERS TO FACE 

THREE MAINE TEAMS 

Home Contest will be with Bates 
Next Saturday Afternoon. 



Having gained confidence in itself by- 
its victory over the I'niv. of Oklahoma 
debating team two weeks ago, the M.A.C. 

team will go against the distinguished 
aggregation from hates College next 
Saturday afternoon in the Memorial 

Building. In addition to this debate the 
team will make a trip to Maine during 
which it will face the I'nivcrsity of Maine 
at Orono, Thursday, Feb. 38, and Colby 
at Watcrville on Friday, Feb. 2»>. 

The q ue st ion which will Ik- in debate 
with the University of Maine and Colby 
is "Resolved, that CottgllM should pass 
uniform marriage and divorce laws." 
The M.A.C. team will take the affirmative. 

In these three debates the M.A.C. team 
will Ik- made up of Kliot P. Dodge '2t>, 
Ralph \V. Haskins '27 and Herman E. 
Pickens '27. This is the same team which 
deleated the l'niv. ol Oklahoma, the mid- 
western champions last year. The question 
in debate with Hates is "Resolved, that 
the I'nited States should enter I he World 
Court as established by the League of 
Nations." The negative will be taken by 
the home team. 

This debate with Hates College is con- 
sidered the most outstanding on the 
schedule this season. The team which 
will face the M.A.C. team is practically 
the same which r eprese nted Hates last 

year in its debate with Oxford. Ibis. 
team is also noteworthy because it is the 
first American team to take part in an 
international debate. In this country the 

Hates College team undoubtedly ranks 

above that of any other college. The 

time lor this i m port a nt contest has been 

Ml at 4 p. m. in order that all who an 
interested may attend. It is hoped that 
a large audience will turn out to hack the 

team becau-e the li.it - team lias attracted 
a very large gathering for all its debate- 
so far this season. 



STUDENTS FAVOR 

ELECTION CHANGE 



Much Discussion at Student Forum 
on Subject of Managerial Flections. 



At the Student Forum held last week 

Wednesday, practically all the discussion 
centered about the undergraduate mana- 
gerships in the various sports The first 
subject brought up was a proposal for a 
change in the method of selection. Under 
the present system the nanus of the tsro 
candidates having t be highest competitive 

rating are voted upon by the student 

body, one being elected assistant manager. 

It was argued that the result of such an 

election might Im- determined by frater- 
nity politics and social bias, rather than 
the merits of the candidates. By the 

pro po sed change, the assistant manager 
would be selected l>y a committee com* 
posed of the general manager of athletica 
and the captain and manager of the 

particular s|>ort, it teng urged that 

these men would be in an excellent 
position to pass judgment on the fitness 

of the candidates. A vote on this pro- 
posal showed that it was favored by a 
large majority of the students. A motion 
that the assistant manager be made one 
of the committee to choose his successor 
was voted down by a small margin. As 
another innovation, it was suggested that 
the manager of each sport receive his 
letter at the end of his year as assistant 
manager since he will already have 
earned it, and will thereby be given a 
chance to wear his letter before he 
graduates. This motion also was voted 
upon favorably. 



Sigma Phi Epsilon held an impromptu 
victrola party Monday night, with thir- 
teen couples present. Miss Mary Foley 
acted as chaperone 



NOTICE 

The prelims for the Junior 
Prom are on sale now and may 
Ik- obtained from any inembei ol 
the committee, which is com- 
posed ol the following: 

Everett Pylc, Chairman 

Eehvin Haertl 

Raymond < iriftin 

Edward Council 

Herbert \ erity 



PURPLE SEXTET 
AVENGES ITSELF 



Williams Team Shuts 
Ice Men by 7 — Score. 



Out Aggie 



Williams avenged itself on the Agates 

for the defeat sulTcrcd at M.A.C. last year 
by shutting out the Aggie puckstcrs, 7 to 
(I at Williamstown last Tuesday. The 

Purple p res en ted ■ strong, husky, speedy 

sextet which held the whip hand through- 
out the an Hie, although they could not 
score in the last period. The second 
session saw the Williams squad at its 
best when it tattled five times. 

The M.A.C. sextet fought namely 
against the heavier and more skillful 
Williams outfit, but were unable to score. 
Cary Palmer, overwhelmed with shots, 

displayed a g<x»d tight , and "Abie" 

Abrahamson and "Joe" Forest did notable 
work. Hlaney of Williams, with three 

goals to his credit, was the star p erform er 

of the afternoon. The sununarv: 



Williams 

Hanks. Popham.lw 
Mason, Wat kins, c 
I . Smith, Hlaney, rw 
E. Howe, F. Howe. Id 
Hellyer. Haker, rd 
( hapman, I luti inns, g 

Score Williams 7. M.A.C. (». ( ,oals by 
Hlanev .'I, W'atkills 2, F. Howe, Popham, 
Penalties— F. Howe, 2 minutes. Referee 
— Peacock. Time— three 20 min. periods. 



M.A.C. 
rw, Moberg 
c Prase 
■ . I i H est . Swnn 

id. Abrahamson 

M. R. Potter 

H, Palmer 



ARLINGTON LOSES TO 

TWO AGGIE TEAMS 



Freshman and Two Year Quintets 
Triumph over Leo Duffy's Men. 



The Arlington, \'t. High S ch ool quintet 
lost two «ames on successive days to the 
Two Years and to the freshmen. On 
Friday the Shorthorns were victorious by 
a SCOre of 86 to '•'. and on Saturday, the 
lie-hmen triumphed, 11 to H. Leo 
l>ullv ot Springfield, manager of the 

Flying Agrarians last year is coaching 
the Arlington team. 



Freshmen Win in 

Overtime Period 

Yearlings Break Tie and Score 2K-2S 
Victory. 



Connecticut Wir , As 

Agate Meets Agate 

Hotly Contested Battle Won by Nutmeg Warriors on Neutral 

Floor, 30-26. Smiley and Murdough Play Well for 

Bay State in Agricultural Feud 



The Aggie yearlings won their second 

victory over Turners Falls High Schools 
basketball team at Turners Falls last 

Friday by a score of 28 to 25, but only 
after a strenuous overtime period. The 
teams were tied at 2\ all as the {aim 
ended, and an extra session was neCSSSTj 
for the freshmen to win. 

Webber and Tompkins starred for the 
freshmen and Captain Swiecz featured 
for Turners Falls 



J. S. CORT SPEAKS AT 

AN. HUS. CLUB MEETING 



About twenty were p raasnl .it the 
meeting of the Animal Husbandry Club 
last Thursday evening and heard a very 
interesting talk by Mr. J. S. Cort of the 
Massachusetts Department . of Agricul- 
ture. Mr. Cort gave a very informal 
account of some of his e xperienc es as a 
homesteader in South Dakota, where he 
spent some time attempting to work a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres. 
According to Mr. Cort, conditions in that 
section are anything but favorable to 
agriculture. He then compared the 
opportunities in farming offered by 
South Dakota with those offered by New 
England, the result being rather en- 
couraging to the farmers of the latter 
region. 



Springfield First 
To Defeat Agates 

Most Thrilling Battle in Years 
Finally Won by Y.M.C.A. Basketeers 
in Closing Seconds, 23—21. 

In the lastcst basketball name that has 

been played on the Drill Hall loot in 

two years, the Aggie live was beaten, by 
the Springfield quintet, 21 to 231, break 
inn 'he string of victories which the 
Agates have amassed this winter. The 
game started 2 to 2 and nearly ended 
21 to 2|, The passing by both teams was 
almost perfect and both teams, fighting 
desperately, were checking to perfection 
although Springfield did find one weak 
s|Hit in the Aggie defense which they 
pilfered consistently 

James was the first scorer Brit* an 
eagil shot, but Temple soon tied tin- 
count with a shot from the center of the 
loor. I'artcnhcimcr added two more with 
the prettiest shot of the evening, a one 
hand Hip. James and Wagner, however, 
sun ceded in tying the score at ."> all. 
Temple, in rare lorm, contributed another 
long shot followed by a tut on the p.ut 
of James, and another by I'artenheiinet , 
which, in addition to a tool shot by 
Warner, brought the count to H» S. 
James, Springfield's salvation throughout 
the period, tied the count inst before 
Temple tallied again from the floor, hut 

a free try by Kerry and another BOOT 
basket put Springfield in the lead, !.'{ to 
12, at half time. 

The second half was a wild exhibition 
of team work. The score did not once 
show a margin of more than two points 
for either team. F.rickson, who had been 
substituted for Wagner at the end of the 
first |>eriod when the latter turned bis 
ankle, proved to be a veritable demon and 
it was he who was responsible for the 
Agates' downfall. However, it was a 
battle of teams and the SOOTC is a good 

indication of the relative merits of the 

tWO aggregations. Griffin scored first in 
this period with two foul shots ami 
Erichson tied the score at 1 Call by a Itee 

try. Griffin put MAC. two pointa ahead 

again but Springfield came back with two 
of the same kind, raising the count to 
18-18. Tempk evened the tall} again bv 

cutting and « Iriffin crashed through with a 
comer shot score, 90 to 18. Berry and 

( ,riliin each ((Minted from the foul line 
for one each and then Berry evened the 
count for the last time with ■ prettj 

coiner shot. J, imes. now a fighting 

machine, made good one ol his man) 

tries jn ! In last few minutes tor the 
Continued on I'.ifte 2) 

AGATES TAKE EASY 
GAME FROM VERMONT 

Aggie's Powerful Offense Proves Too 
Much for Visitors in .W-12 Victory. 

The v.usiiv quintet f>ok an easy game 
from the Univ, of Vermont nt the Drill 
Hail last Saturday afternoon. The Agati - 
took tie lead at the start an I outplayed 

their Opponents throughout the name. 

The Vermont team put up a game fight 
but were unable to break through Aggie's 
five man defense and couM not stop the 

bewildering offense led bv Temple, Smile) . 

and I'artenheimer. 

The first period started with a rush, 

I'artenluiiner tallying twice and Temple 
sinking one in after naJaainf two fret ti 
A moment Inter Temple scored again trom 

the fifteen foot mark. Vermont tallied 

for the first time when Prentice made a 
free try. Temple followed with another 
|>erfect shot. Vermont registered a foul 
shot arid Post sank in their tirst tltH>r 
basket. "R" CritTen made good on two 
foul shots and Vermont retaliated with a 
free try and a tally from the tloor I 
tenheimer sCOffd again and Temple 
dropjK'd a clean one from the twelve loot 
line. Jones made a foul shot and Temple 
missed two as the gun ended the half 
(Continued on rag* * 



Agate met Anale and AgatS beat 
Agate on the larne lloor surrounded by 
a large Crowd, estimated at 12(H), at 
South Mam luster, Conn., last Monday 
Right. Tin- Mass Angie live was beaten 
by the Conn. Aggie (m- .{() t,, jn. The 
Itav Slaters piled up a lead in the first 
twenty minutes which readied its |M-ak at 
hall time, the score board reading, Mass. 
2(1, Conn. 14. Hut the leaders were unable 
to hold up their end against the onslaught 
of their opponents in the second session 
and the latter came from behind with a 
brilliant show of basketball led bv the 
phenomenal marksman, Si hotield, and 
tied the count at 21 21, and piled up si\ 
more |>oints before the final gun 

The Mass. Angies led off with a foul 

shot ami the Ntttmeggera with a Boor 

basket, thus nivinn Connecticut the .i<\ 
VaatagS of the heavy end ol (he count at 
the start, but this position was soon to be 
disputed. The Hay Staters came back 
with three twin counters to their OpCNM 

rats' <nie and three loul shots, ft gain the 

Massachusetts team rallied this time 
allowing Connecticut no score against 
their basket and three tools. M\ this 
lime (he count stood II to 7. Ilowevei, 
both teams were warming up to the fight 
and they both squeezed out seven |kmiiIs 
in the next lew minutes. The final (ally 
in the |>eriod came just before the gun 
and increased the lead bv two, the count 
now reading- 20 to I I. 

The s eco n d hall found the Connecticut 
team eager to fight up to the top again 
and tin- Massachusetts live bewdih-ied 
bv this new showing of fight. Three fouls 
brought ixiints against the leaders and 
S, hotield showed his goods beloie t lie 
Bay Staters seored again. When tbev 
final!) did score, their lead was seriously 

threatened, lor the count stood 20 to 10, 

22 to IP. and 22 lo 21 in almost as many 
seconds. The N ill meggers weie aroused 
by (heir proximilv lo viciorv alter having 

bean so far in the rent and they rontsaawid 

to press the M.A.C. delense. Itoth te. 11114 

scored 21 to 22. Then Scacanan raw 

to the limelight again, lie execute.l ,1 
one hand shot , while closely guarded, Iroiil 
the comer, and the ball did not even 
tnuch the hoop but swished in the netting 
as it u bad been shot from a mathemati- 
cally regulated mortar, The s, an was 

tied, 21 to 21. Smilev made good a tree 

shot; C o nn e c ticut made good a free 

shot; then Schofield sunk one ol those 
prett) (oilier shols that bast kin. ks 1 he 

backboard; and finally three more |»oinis 
wen added lo the Connecticut end of 
the count before the final gun 

Murdough played 1 good game; had 
it not been for him the Connecticut 
would have had iii.inv more 
id, ones to shoot and to follow HI. but hi- 
did well in covering the ball under the 
basket. Smilev was 1 | lr high scorer, 
although closely fol l ow ed bv Rarten- 
lieiiiier. among the M.iss Agates. Smiley 

Was a lug factor in the Aggie defense and 

ionics show thai offensively he did his 
■tuff. Schofield without doubt kept the 

Nutnieggers in the running by hi- shot-; 
his teammates were good, but he mM 



1 he siimiii.irv : 




Conn. Aggie Mass Aggie 


I'. P.P. 


li 1 P. 


F.ddv.rf 2 (» 1 Smilev .lb 


a a '.» 


S hotield. If a 313 Cnllin.ib 


1 2 i 


M.ikofski.c 2 I .") Jone 


i) it 


Bitgood.rb '• 1 1 Murdough.c 


11 ti 


Allard.lb 1 B 7 Temple.lt 


3 <» 4 


I'.irt'h'mer.rf 


a 3 h 


Kelso, rf 


(i 


Thomas, rf 

Totals lOioatJ totals 


11 1 i 


8 M2C 


Continued on Pngt 2) 




OPPONENTS' SCORES 




Wesdeyan J4, Trinity S3. 


\mtu-rst .11, Williams 18. 




Dartmouth IS, Norwich 1J. 




Brown 41, Clark 14. 




Conn. Aggies 47, Vermont 41. 


Middlebury 27. Norwich 19. 





THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 24, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 24, 1926 



Til MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Oftcial newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 


Mast T. Boyd '26 


Editor-in-Chief 


Jqwm F. Lambert '2C 


Managing Editor 


DEPARTMENT EDITORS 


Editorial 


Mary T. Boyd '26 


Oder PreM 


Mary T. Boyd 26 


Athletics 


William L. Dols "27 




Harold L. Clark 28 


L. 


Rockwell Smith. Jr. '28 


Canput Newt 


Ernest L. Spencer "28 




Ellsworth Barnard '28 




Edward H. Nichols. "29 




William R. Phinnby. '29 


Ce-Fd New* 


Frances C. Bruce "27 


Alumni 


Josephine Paniica 28 


Faculty Newe 


W. Gordon Hunter 29 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Alvin C. Stevbns '26 Business Manager 

Charles P. Reed "26 Advertising M anager 

Lbwis H. Whitakbr '27 Circulation Manager 

■ John E. White '27 

Douglas W. Losing '28 

Charles F. Clagg '27 

Edwin A. Wilder "28 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered a* aecond-claM matter at the Amherit 
PoTt Office. Accepted for mailing ft ^cial 'ate 
of postage provided for in section 1 103. Act of Oc- 
tober! 1817 authorized August 20. 1918. 



Student Bore-'ems and Why 

"If you likea thing the first thing you 
want to do is change it. If you love the 
landscape, you go out and cut down a 
tree. If you love your garden, you make 
it over. If you love your country, you at 
once think up ways to change it. And if 
you love your college, there's a perfect 

uproar." 

Prof. Erskine told us that, in the first 
of his series of illuminating lectures now 
being given at Amherst College. Further- 
more, he said, "Change is rooted in dis- 
content," and then more obscurely, "You 
remember things by changing them." 

That relates to us very directly. For 
we have just sat through the term-re- 
current farce optimistically designated as 
"Student Forum." Student? Hardly. 
For the discussions are pre-decided, 
coached, and run according to schedule 
They are hardly ever spontaneous ex 
pressions of student feeling. And it is 
our own fault that they are not. We are 
too accustomed to think that our indi- 
vidual opinion has no weight. We sit in 
our Assembly scats and think: "This 
means nothing in my life. Wish they'd 
get it over. Hey, what are wc voting on? 
Sure, I'm Voting with the gang. There's 
another bird getting up— shut up, will 
y<m? SO <M am K'' 1 'his over and get out. 
Oh, Mt down.'' We think something like 
that, and we forget that our thinking, 
multiplied by tbt total of our fellow stu- 
dents, gives birth to that heavily oppres- 
sive, intangible, all-powerful thing, public 

feeling. We owsehres kill our own spon- 
taneity, and make Student Forum the 
Stupid thing it i>. 

And in the Student lorunis above all 
things we should be vitally interested, 
for they are our best — almost our only — 
means of expnssing our Will-to-Change, 
which, as Prof. Krskinc points out, is 
rooted in the very depths of our COOege 
feeling. If we realty loved our college, as 
we profess to do by song and cheer, we 
would be full of suggestions for changes. 
Forum would t>c a live meeting place of 
minds in action, instead of an endurance 
contest bet wet n us and the hands of the 
clock. 

It is very easy to say, "Well, if the 
remedy is SO simple, let's apply it. Why 

doesn't the student body come to and 

show its loyalty and its appreciation?" 
There you are! There is no student body, 
really — certainly not in the sense in which 
we are using the term. There is no Stu- 
dent body. There is you. and there is 
UK,— and there are both of us, multiplied 
to some odd hundreds, and that is all. 
What you think is what the student body 
thinks. What you think forms public 
opinion. What you think makes of our 
College a sin cess or a failure. What \ou 
think n akes Student Forum a cut and 
dried farce or a live value in our college 
life. What you think: that is all. So you 
can see that it is up to you to think 

straight. 



I or Washington has been pulled down 
from his narrow pedestal in the hearts of 
the patriotically pious, and shown to be 
not merely the icily superior "Father of 
His Country", but a very human man. 
Rupert Hughes started it, and now 
George's memory will be revered not only 
by the high-minded, but by the drinking, 
dancing, and swearing sets. It must be 
discounted that this memory has, of course 
always t>een revered by students— who 
would revere that of Kdgar the Ash-man 
if it gave them a yearly holiday. 

This cx|>osure of the humanity of the 
great Washington is particularly interest- 
ing to students, however, since it helps 
to remove to some degree the chief 
obstacle to understanding study of past 
men and events. It is almost impossible 
for us to realize that men of even a 
hundred years ago were men, not histori- 
cal characters only. We read of what 
they did, and what they said—and we 
look at their printed likenesses in their 
particularly virtuous-looking clothes, and 
they are as unreal to us as any image- 
that slips across the silver screen. We need 
to know them as men, and unfortunately, 
to realize that they were men at all, we 
need to know their faults. The summing 
up of a man's virtues gives him a funereal 
unreality— the summing up of his vices, 
humanity. Regrettable, but natural. 

Washington then is emerging as a 
human l>eing. This is well for us, if only 
Mr. Hughes will be merciful and not too 
insistant. Modern America— at any rate 
modern young America— is very Creek in 
its reactions. It wants its deities human, 
full of faults, comprehensible, but at the 
same time it wants them supernaturally, 
remotely, superior. The new Washington 
should fill the bill perfectly. 




AT THE ABBEY 



AGATES TAKE EASY 

(Continued from Page 1) 

with the score 17 to 7 in favor of Aggie. 
The second half started with Thomas 
playing right forward in place of Parten- 
heimer. Griffen started the scoring for 
M.A.C. by sinking in from under the 
basket and Temple connected on a pass 
from Smiley after the latter's quick inter- 
ception of a Vermont pass. "Larry" 
Jones then made good a free try and 
Kelso was sent in for Thomas. Kelso 
connected for a floor basket almost im- 
mediately and Griffen followed him up 
with a foul shot. Kelso scored another 
floor basket and Vermont got their first 
tally of the period with a long shot 
from Post. At this point Murdough was 
sent in for Jones, Partenheimer for Kelso, 
Kane for Temple, and Thomas for Smiley. 
Partenheimer tallied immediately with a 
floor basket and a foul shot. Vermont 
made the last score of the game with a 
dean long shot from Post again. Temple, 
Jones, and Smiley were sent in for Thomas, 
Kane, and Murdough, and started the 
old combination to working again when 
the final gun ended the game. Temple 
featured the |MM tor A KK'* - l*''nR high 
KOrer and fast and aggressive in his floor 
work. Post starred for Vermont getting 
all their floor baskets. The summary: 

M.A.C. Vermont 

B.F.P. B.I l\ 



Holiday Song, 

Little (ieorgie and his hatchet — 

Never was a lie to match it; 

(ieorgie always told the truth — 

Just exactly like Babe Ruth; 

(ieorgie was his country's father — 

Rupert Hughes says he was rather 

More a gambler and a dancer 

And a general high prancer: 

Be that right or be it way off, 

We thank (ieorgie for his Day-off! 

CP 

That Primrose Again 

Wordsworth's Perennial Platform Prim- 
rose has made its monthly-at-least ap- 
pearance among us — viewed from a 
slightly different angle this time. Hither- 
to, we have been gently egged into view- 
ing said Pet Primula in the infra-Words- 
worthian manner, which is rhapsodical 
and incomprehensible. Now we are 
urged to view the Primrose, per se, in a 
sort of "Take the cash and let the credit 
go" manner— which for the 20th Century 
may be freely translated as "Be rapturous 
and let Science slide." 

We wonder if we haven't been undent- 
ing Mr. W.'s intelligence all these years. 
He was not, if we remember correctly, 
particularly interested in the gentlemen 
to whom the Primrose was a Primrose 
"and nothing more". Possibly Words- 
worth knew that the Primrose, if too 
closely inspected, causes a distressing 
rash to appear on the inspectee's person. 
Hence the gentle hint that we should 
know "something more". Maybe, — 
maybe. 

CP 

The Month's Best Crack 

We read: "Co-eds know some men, 
and not others, and they generally know 
them in a way which has little bearing on 
their managerial ability." 

Really? 

CP 



COMMUNICATIONS 



Barbara Huke '26 is at her home 
re< separating f fom a recent operation for 
appendicitis. 

M 

"Pete" Perley was visiting on campus 
this last week-end. 

M 

On Sunday, February 14, Mrs. Marsh 
held a tea at the Women's Club, for 
for the Two Year co-eds. 
M 

The annual Delta Phi Valentine dance 
was held last Friday evening. Soft red 
lights, dancing silhouettes, and hearts of 
all sizes were the basis of the decorations. 
About forty couples attended, including 
alumnae and several out-of-town guests. 
Music was furnished by the Coq D'Or 
Orchestra. The formal began at five- 
thirty. At eight o'clock, supper was 
served at Draper Hall by Miss Diet her. 
After this, dancing continued until one 
o'clock. Miss Skinner, Miss Hamlin, 
Mrs. Hicks and Mrs. Machmer were the 
chaperones. 

M 

The colonial Women's Club house fur- 
nished a delightful background for the 
team dance given by Delta Phi on Satur- 
day afternoon. Thirty couples attended. 
Mrs. Marsh and Mrs. Rand were chaper- 
ones. Dancing was from five until nine 
o'clock. 



New Slang 
A Herbarium Specimen 

We found it in the dictionary. Now wc 
ask you, is that reasonable? A dictionary, 



CONNECTICUT WINS 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

Score at half time— M.A.C. 20, C.A.C. 
14. Referee — Young. Time — 20-minute 
periods. 



STUDENT LIBERALS HOLD 

MEETING AT AMHERST 



Aspects of the Race Problem Dis- 
cussed by Young People. 



A meeting of about fifty-five young 
men and women of the Student Federa- 
tion of Religious Liberals was held 
Saturday afternoon and Sunday, Feb. 
13 and 14. Those who attended the 
meeting enjoyed a dinner in Draper Hall 



The Collegian is at all timet glad to publUh 
any communications which may be sent to it, bui 
the Editors will assume no responsibility for the 
views expressed, and do not necessarily emiot* 
such views. 

To the Editor 

of the Collegian: 

The editorial in last week's Collegian 
has touched ujxrn an important state sj 
affairs. The article referred to was tfc 
tremely general in nature; but 1 wonder 
if it is not especially applicable to the 
case of our own Collegian? 

For some time past there has been, in 
the various editorials, an indefinable, but 
never-t he-less noticeable feeling of con- 
servatism; as if some censorial cloud were 
hanging over the editorial sanctum, pre- 
venting open statements of opinions u|x>n 
vital questions. One cannot but sense it, 
and in the editorial to which I am refer- 
ring it is unusually apparent. It is plain 
that the author of this article is intensely 
interested in the question upon which he 
writes; but it is also evident that he hsj 
been afraid to state openly his complete 
opinion. 

Has it come to this? Are we, the 
student body, to be denied the right to 
express our opinions without hedging, 
upon any subject we see fit to choose? b 
the paper for whose maintenance tM pay 
to be controlled, supervised and censored 
by some conservative person of the "old 
school"? 

College, as has been so excellently 
stated in the editorial referred to, is a 
hotbed of new ideas, many of them in- 
compatible with those of the older 
generation. It is more than this, it is the 
very point of a great wedge entering, by 
experiment, the great unknown. 

W'e shall np doubt commit indiscret- 
ions; but did not our censors do likewise, 
in the days of their youth? We, as they, 
must learn. And it is proverbially true 
that experience is the teacher nonpareil. 
Let us, then, have freedom of the press; 
for if it proves necessary one might always 
cause the paper to become independent 
of the guiding hand of our dear old alma 
mater! 

H. J. Harris '27 



aSK you, 19 Uldl icanunauivi * » .■•v.wv....*. j , nulling dlJCFJtcI a viiiiiivi •■■ *^.«|^-. • *••■- 

possibly by virtue of its academic associa- Sunday noon. The topic under discussion 
tions, always seems so staidly conserva- was "The Race Problem". The Federa- 



TempUxlf 6 010 Katz.rg 

Kane.lf Moody.rg 

Part h-mer.rf 4 1 Q Price.lg 

Thomas.rf Thompson.lg Q 



Kelso.rf 
J ones, c 
Murdough ,c 
Smiley, lg 
C.riffen.rg 



3 4 Marvin.c 

Q 2 2 Prentice,rf 

Q Post.lf 


i a s 



ooo 

4 4 
4 8 



Totals IS 690 Totals 4 412 

Referee — A. G. Johnson. Umpire — 
Tom Finn. Time — 20-minute halves. 



George and Rupert 



It has been lltfintrfl that Washington's 

Birthday this year must have been more 

"universally celebrated than ever before. 



SPRINGFIELD FIRST 

(Continued from Paftc 1) 

winning points. Seconds dragged into 
years as the battle raged and almost 
e ve ry o n e had forgotten that there would 
be an end when the gun rei>ort rever- 
berated t hro ugh o ut the rafters of the 
Drill Hall. 
The summary: 
Springfield Mass. Aggie 

B.F.P, B.F.P. 

:{ 1 7 C.rirrin.rb 2 3 7 

2 4 Smiley, lb 

1 1 S Jones.c 

2 1 1 I'art'h'tner.rf 
1 2 4 Thomas, rf 
Temple, If 



James, If 
Burr.rf 

Wagner ,c 

Friekson.c 
Berry. lh 
Crowley, rb 



1 1 

o o 

2 1 I 



4 8 



tive. Frivolous words? Of course, but all 
pro per ly labelled and exhibited, for t he- 
dictionary is the herbarium of the etymolo- 
gist. 

Slang exists in the herbarium— but its 
place is precarious, wavering from the 
terse security tinged with opprobrium of 
"Colloq" to the outer darknesses of 
language indicated by the still terser 
"Obs". Se that to find the dictionary 
actually quoting at full length a slang 
phrase — suggesting it, you see, instead of 
tacitly suppressing it, — was distinctly 
refreshing. 

The phrase? "Putting on scallops" 
which is another way of saying "Putting 
on airs." Don't you like it? Don't put 
on scallops— he's putting on scallops 
again — Don't scallop me! — the thing has 
infinite possibilities. And it is so old it 
is new. 

We found it. (Business of the Aggie- 
Anvil Chorus) "Well, don't put on scallops 
over it!" 

CP 

Some Local Diction 

Mistaken — I thought you were a mem- 
ber of the (ilee Club? 

Mistook— No, I don't gleek. 

CP 

"Mememto" 

This present era of hand-painted shirts 
and lavishly decorated leather jacket* 
and raincoats has brought to light some 
quaint examples of student art. The 
fraternity seal and the college letters are 
of course favorites — together with t he- 
roster of one's personal acquaintances 
drawn largely on one's back so that he 
who walks behind may read. 

There is even a copy of a much-dis- 
cussed Squib cover, but the prize — the 
beautiful crepe-dc-ehine milk pail — goes 
to the cautious soul who blazons to the 
world his motto: 

'Beware the Abbey!" 
CP 



tion is sponsored by the young people of 
the Unitarian Church, but consists of 
representatives from all denominations. 

Professor Frank H. Hawkins of Smith 
College spoke on "The Nordic Doctrine." 
Professor Philip Bradley of the Political 
Science Department of Amherst College- 
spoke about the "Political and Kconomic 
Aspects of the Race Problem." Prof. W. 
J. Newlin of Amherst College s|>okc 
Sunday afternoon on the subject of 
"Tolerance." A discussion was held after 
each speech. 

The students chose the topics and 
speakers and led the discussions. This 
Federation, because it is sponsored by 
the students themselves, is making great 
strides towards the ideal of toleration. 



'21 Richard B. Lambert is managing 
the Yankee Orchards at MM Fast St, 
Pittsfield, a fruit farm of about six 
thousand trees. 



TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lsmbda Chi Alpha House. Tel. 325* 



COLLEGE SHOLS 

TOWN PRICES 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



MILITARY NOTES 



Totals 9 691 Tot, ils 8 .")21 

Store at half time— Springfield 13, 

Mass. Aggie 12 Referee — Jackson. 

Time — 20-minute periods. 



To ?, Snowshoeing 

There was a little girl 
Who took a little whirl 

Cross the pond— but she won't any more 
She crashed right through the snow 
To the waters cold lielow 

While a Faculty laughed wildly on the 
shore! 

CP 

And that's that! 



The military exhibition on High School 
Day this year promises to be more 
interesting than usual. Since 1922 only 
the juniors and seniors have had an 
active part in the military exerciser 
This year the freshmen are to be present 
in the review and dismounted drill, 
which is to be staged at 9.30. From 9.45 
to 11.00, the sophomores are to put on 
an exhibition of mounted gymnastics. At 
11.00, the juniors and seniors are to 
occupy the show ring. 

The best drilled troop, in dismounted 
drill and in the review is to receive a silk 
guidon. The competition for this guidon 
will start as soon as the outside drill 
begins. This award has not been pre- 
sented since 1922, when Troop C won it. 
A board of officers from the War Depart- 
ment is to inspect the corps and the 
college, to ascertain whether or not we 
shall receive the "Distinguished College 
Rating." This special rating is given to 
only those colleges and universities which 
show especially good work in military 
science. If M.A.C. receives this rating, 
students who take the advanced course- 
in military training will be classed higher 
by the War Department than they now 
are. 




Professor Clark L. Thayer, head of the 
Department of Floriculture, spoke at the 
annual banquet of the Boston C.ardeners' 
and Florists' Club held in Boston on 
Thursday, Feb. 11. 



No well dressed college man is 
without one. It's the original, 
correct slicker and there's noth- 
ing as smart or sensible for rough 
weather and chilly days. 
Made of famoiM yellow waterproof 
oiled fabric. Hat all-'round «r«P on 
collar and elastic at wri»W»anda. 

Clasp -closing style 

Button-closing style 

Stamp the correct name In J°g* 
memory, and buy no other. l«J* 
"Standard Student" U made only 
by the Standard Oiled Clothins Co- 
New York. Slip one on 

AH Best Dealers 



HlCKEY-FREEMAN Give you a new delight in th< 

- - Clothes - - c,othe8 vou wear 




The Rest In Drug Store Merchandise 

The Best in Drug Store Service 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 



IS AT 



DRURY'S 



College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



NORTHAMPTON 



ACADEMY OF MUSIC 



Paul Hansell presents 

The Northampton Repertory Company 

— THIS WEEK — 

" The Doctor's Dilemma " 

A serious comedy of comic disputation by- 
Bernard Shaw. 

Which is most worth saving, transporting 
beauty or plodding usefulness? 



Next Week 

"The Truth About Blayds" 

Evenings at 8.15 Sat. Mat. at 2.15 

Pricea: 50c. to $1.10. (including tax) 

Phone 435 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

Your College work will greatly improve if 
you use a typewriter. Come in and let us 
show you a Corona or Remington Portable. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANE 



WINCHESTER 

Iporting and Athletic Goods 




The Flag 
at the Finish 

Performance at the finish is 
what counts — not the bril- 
liant start or the third mile 
spurt. 

In the biggest race of all. the 
Life Income Plan assures a 
strong finish. 

It guarantees $100 a month 
for life from age 65 on, prevent- 
ing old age dependence. In 
the early stages, too, it helps, 
paying an income to you or 
your family if you're disabled 
or die prematurely. Inquire. 

Connecticut General 
Life InsuranceCompany 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



he Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons" 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



ROY D. HARRIS 

P. O. Box 273 Tel. Greenfield 1873-M 
Greenfield, Mass. 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUMSIN6WEAR and NEDALIA 
SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $1.39 $1.75 

G. Edward Fisher 




JAMES A. LOWELL 

BOOKSELLER 



Dollar Day - February 27th 

— BARGAINS IN STATIONERY and BOOKS 

M. A. C. Die Stamped Letter Packets 
Die Stamped - 1929 Old Hampshire Vellum 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

At OUR FOUNTAIN; Waffles with maple syrup, fresh fruit Orange- 
ade, Orange Juice, Canada Dry and Clicquot Ginger Ale 
Soda Sundaes Shakes Smokes 
DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 
ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST & DEACON. Prop*. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 



The Secret of How This Graduate 

Made a Five Figure Income 

In Five Years 



Look 
it on the 

dealer's 
counter 



WRICLEYS 



More 

for your 

money 

and 

the best Peppermint 
Chewing Sweet for 
any money gij 



RK 




LIVED in Newark, Ohio. 

His folks wanted him to go into 
some business around home. 

Wasn't a thing in the town that he 
wanted to drudge along in. 

Figured that having spent four 
yc.irs at college, he didn't exactly 
cotton to tying himself down to 
just a job. 

Neither did be want to go into his 
father's old business. 

So you sec, it was the same old 
story so many of you college fellows 
have to have sooner or later. 

Being a red blooded, two fisted 
kind of a fellow, with lots of pep 
and gn, he wanted to get into some- 
thing where he wouldn't have to keep 
all bottled up. 



Looked around a lot during hia 
college days, and finally decided he 
would build some greenhouses and 
grow lettuce and tomatoes. 

I rom the very start he made money. 

That was 1 1 or so years ago. 

Now he and his Dad tiave a fine 
residence on top of a hill, and from 
their porch now look down on acres 
and acres of greenhouse -covered fields 
of lettuce and tomatoes. 

Both of them are having the time 
of their life. 

If Cirl Weunt of Newark, Ohio 
can do all this, so can you. 

We'll build you the greenhouses 
and help you in every little detail of 
getting started. 

Write us. Let's get the idea work* 
ing and plans started. 



We have just received another largf 
assortment of OVERSHOES at different 
prices. Avoid being too late. 

Hosiery a Specialty 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORK 



If interested u rite to the Manager of our Service Department. I'lmer 
Building, Cleveland, Ohio; who will gn* it hit perscmd attention. 



Jor^&Jjttrnham^Q, 



L 



FREE 

CRAjsiK CASE 

SERVICE for 

FOUNTAIN PENS 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

(SUPPLY LIMITED) 

The New College Store 



M BUILDING 



SPECIAL THINGS 

for 
Special Students 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mass 

Our Laundry First Claaa 

Our Policy Guaranteed 

REPAIRING AND AM. KINDS OF 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICKS. 

Opposite Post Offlc* 



[n Olden Days 

^ e welcome of a guest was in proportion to their personal appearance. How is your girl going to receive you at the house dances? Let us insure you against 
any possible misfortune by giving you the benefit of our experience. A new line of shoes, ties and shirts just in; look us over. 

EXETER CARL H. BOLTER HYANNIS 

AMHERST 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 24, 1926 



I Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thurs. 

3.00. 
7.30 



I 1m picture senv.it ion »f ,he 

■*•!- "THI PHANTOM OP 

TIIK oi'KK.V 
12 reels. with l.oii <:haney, 
Mary I'hllbln. Norman Kerry 
and m CMt Of over V»M>« TWO 
years In the making! I he 
most mailnlHcent hienesever 
In picture* In full color nat 
ural r.hoioiiraphy. l ; rom 
the Internationally famous 
st4>rv h> GtttM I erou*. 
News Fablet Comedy 

AdmUsion 40 cent* 



YE AGGIE INN 



Friday 



6.45, 8.30 



Saturday 

3.00 
4.45 S.30 



Laura l.al'lante, Pal <> Mal- 
ley. lied da Hopper and 
Wyndham Standing In 
• THK TKASKR" 
a brilliant comedy romance 
from Win. Brady's fumom 
Broadway succesr. 
Sporiimhi JreelUyde 

Omk Comedy 



Mon. 



Tom MU and Tony In 

•TIIK YANKKR SENIOR" 
a drama of conflict and ro- 
mance In old Mexico. IhU 
picture, hut never been thown 

In Amherst. 

News Bobby Vernon Corned y 



Town Meeting No movies 



You will find an excellant 

. . . SHOE REPAIRING SHOP ... 
equipped with the moil up-to-date Goodyear 
Machinery and a modern 
SHOE SHINING PARLOR 
at II! ,Amlty-Si.. - Labrovltx Block 

We understand your requirements and are pre- 
pared to meet your needs. ... 
All work guaranteed. Shoes shxned and dyed. 
V INCE NT GRANDONICO, Prop. 

Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the best in everything 



WMGLEYS 




David Grayson : Adventurer 
THE NEW PAMPHLET 

— BY— 

Walter Dyer 
10 CENTS 




AFTER 
EVERY 



MISS CUTLER'S 
..GIFT SHOP.. 



THE NEW IDEAS IN 

FOOTWEAR 

are now on display at 
Holyoke's largest Shoe Store 

THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 

Holyoke 



275 High St. 



S. S. HYDE 
Optician and Jeweler 

3 PLEASANT STREET, (up on* aiAbO 

OculUtu Prescription. Filled. Broken lentew 

accurately replaced 

BIG BEN ALARM CLOCKS and other 

reliable makes 



Probably one 
reason for the 
popularity of 
WRIGLEVS U that it lasts 
so long and return* such 
great dividends for so small 
an outlay. • It keeps teeth 
clean, breath sweet, appetite 
keen, digestion good. 

Fresh and full-flavored 
always in its wax. wrapped 
package* 



Plan to dress up for 

The Coming Vacation 

Real Bargains in - The Most Up-to-date Footwear 

CHARLIE REED 

LAMBDA CHI ALPHA HOUSE 



COLLEGE DIRECTORY 








Telephov 


Associate Alumni 


. William 1. .Goodwin, Ass't Sec'y 


. 175 J 


Memorial Hall . « 


. William I, Goodwin, Mgr. 


. 175-J 


M.A.C. Athletic Association . 


. C. S. Hicks, General Mgr. 


. 403-M 


Academic Activities . 


. Frank P. Rand, Mgr. 


• 1 19-X 


The College Senate . 


. Lawrence L. Jones, Pres. 


• 8314 


Track Association 


. J. E. Greenaway, Mgr. . 


. 8325 


Baseball Association . 


. William L. Dole, Mgr. . 


170 


Football Association . 


. Francis W. Warren, Mgr. 


. 666-M 


The Collegian 


. Mary T. Boyd, Editor 


. 547-M 


Hockey Association . 


. Donald R. Williams, Mgr. . 


. 59-M 


Basketball Association 


. Preston Davenport, Mgr. 


280 


Roister Doisters . 


. Philip N. Dow, Mgr. 


720 




. Harry E. Fraser, Mgr. 


170 




. Myron Smith, Mgr. . 


. 8314 


1927 Index .... 


. Kenneth W. Milligan, Mgr. . 


. 8325 


M.A.C. Christian Association 


. Roy E. Norcross, President 


. 8325 


Public Speaking and Debating 
* 


. Raymond Smith, Mgr. . 


300 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Walt 

NEW PRICES 
Mens Whole Soles. Rubber HeeU - - - SJ.jM 
Men's Half Soles Rubber Heel. - • - >•« 
Men's Rubber Soles, Rubber Heels - - *g 

Men's Half Soles law 

Work Guaranteed— AMHERST HOUSE 

Open till 8P.M. ^ 






Saturday, February 27th 
DOLLAR DAY 

If you want to Save Some Money come 
in and look over our values 



Shirts, 

Men's Aratex Collars, 4 for 
Mallory Hats, size 7 only, $5 to $8 

grades at 
Athletic Union Suits, 

MANY OTHER VALUES NOT LISTED HERE 



$1.00 
1.00 



4.50 
.79 



F. M. Thompson 8c Son 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



When silvery 

moonlight falls on town and 

field — and the long, joyous 

tour home is ready to begin 

— have a Camel! 



a 



BOSTONIANS" 



SHOES 



FOR 



MEN 



YOU WILL BE PROUD OF YOUR FEET 
IF THEY ARE IN BOSTONIANS 



B0LLES SHOE STORE 

MAIN STREET - - AMHERST 




WHEN moonlight washes 
woodland and hills with 
platinum light. And the 
tour home is ready to 
begin — have a Camel! 

For Camel makes 
every smooth tour 
smoother, adds of its 
own contentment to 
every delightful journey. 
Camels never tire your 
taste or leave a cigaretty 
after -taste. Pay what 
you will, you'll never get 
choicer tobaccos than 
those in Camels. 

So this night as the 
forest-topned hills race 
by in moonlit proces- 
sional. As the magic 
road curves through the 
colonnades of birches- 
have then the finest made, 
regardless of price. 

Have a Camel! 




Camels contain the very choicest tobaccos grown in all the 
world. Camels are blended by the world's most expert 
blenders. Nothing is too good for Camels. In the making 
of this one brand we concentrate the tobacco knowledge and 
skill of the largest organization of tobacco experts in the 
world. No other cigarette made is like Camels. They are 
the overwhelming choice of experienced smokers. 



01926 




Our hight,t wuh, 'fy^. 
do not yet know 0""" 
quality, h that you « 
,hem. { We inrite you "> 
compare Camel, •"'* 
any cigarette made *■ 

any price. 
R. J. Reynold. Tobscco 

Compsoy 



CLOTHES, CLOTHES, CLOTHES— 

AN OLD STORY BUT AN EVER PRESENT NEED A NECESSITY WHICH CAN BEST BE FILLED BY 

CONSULTING WITH 1 1 

SOUTHWICK BROS. & GAUL» 



V..\ ■ 19?6 
cultural 



R. D. Sawyer, 1 926 Manager. 4 or 5 students from freshman, sophomore and junior classes wanted ■ == 

' Steady Work. Apply before March 1 to R. D. Sawyet I Vg; * AAtl 



Xo\. XXXVI. AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 3, 1926 Nof*) 



Aggie Musical Clubs 

Give Four Concerts 

Songsters Attain Unprecedented Success on Trip East. Many 
Interesting Events on 200-Mile Journey. 



I (lU r concerts in three days sounds 
1|lv( . a difficult assignment, doesn't it:* 
Hut the M.A.I'. Musical Chilis thrived 
on it. and the long-awaited trip to eastern 
Ma^uhusetts turned out to be the most 
pKCCtdvA concert tour that Annie's song- 
Htrl have ever made. Performances 
Mft«VM hi Rutland, Holden, Stow and 
\uliurndale. Kach concert seemed to DC 
just ■ little better than the one before, 
an ,l at each place the men seemed to 
| iaV ,' just a little better time than before. 
It would have been practically impossible 
to have Improved on the concluding per- 
formance, from any standpoint whatso- 
ever. 

The trip was made in a large bus and 
two sedans, the personnel including 35 
nun. The musical nomads left campus 
Thursday morning, stopping at Ware 
for lunch. From there they took good, 
t, a ,l, indifferent and wrong roads, finally 
reaching Rutland just about in time for 
ihe concert, which was scheduled at 3 
o'clock. The performance was given at 
the K. of C. Hall at the U. S. Veterans 
Hospital, under the auspices of the 
American Red Cross. A microphone was 
Installed on the stage, and those of the 
veterans who were unable to leave their 
beds heard the music by radio. "Dutch" 
Ansell and the dance orchestra were en- 
ured repeatedly, although all the acts 
received their share of applause. Follow- 
ing the concert, the men were shown 
around the hospital, and were then 
given supper at the cafeteria. 

At 6.30 when the songsters set out for 
Holden, a steady rain was falling, making 
the already slippery roads even more 
treacherous. On the way out of the 
hospital grounds one of the cars skidded 
badly, and only by a matter of inches 
missed dropping over a forty-foot embank- 
ment. From then on, the progress of the 
cars reminded one of the proverbial "half 
an inch, half an inch, half an inch on- 
ward", for the ruts were so deep and 
slippery that two cars could not possibly 
pass each other. Each time another car 
was encountered, the strong-arm squad 
had to be sent ahead to carry it out of 
the way. At this rate, the bus and the 
car following it arrived at Holden at 9.15. 
Luckily, one car had been more fortunate, 
and the occupants kept the crowd amused 
until the bulk of the musicians could get 
there. "Dutch" Ansell did some of his 
(amy dancing, and Hans Baumgartner 
t in impromptu yodeling act. while 
"Bloody" Mills acted as interlocutor. 
Bruk of their tardiness, the men did 
not bother to change into tuxedoes, but 
went on the stage as they were. The 
oncerl sounded even better than the one 
in the afternoon, and the audience, which 
practically filled the hall, seemed to feel 
well repaid for having braved the storm. 
Dancing afterward lasted until midnight, 
and the men were parked for the night 
at the homes of members of the American 
Legion, under whose auspices the concert 
was given. Profits from this concert 
were devoted to the benefit of athletics 
at Holden High School. 
In the morning, the men started on 
(Continued on P*«« 2) 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



A cheerful comrade is better 
than a waterproof coat and a 
foot-warmer— Henry Van Dyke. 

Wednesday— 
Varsity basketball: Tufts at Med- 
ford. 
Thursday — 
"30 p. m. Floriculture Club dance 
and card party in French Hall. 
Friday — 
Student Missionary Conference. 
House Dance: Lambda Chi Alpha. 
Saturday — 
Student Missionary Conference. 
House Dances: Theta Chi. Alpha 
^Kina Phi, Sigma Phi Fpsilon, 
Alpha C.amma Rho. 
Sunday — 
"l"a. m. Chapel. 
Student Missionarv Conference. 



DEBATERS WIN TWICE 
BUT LOSE TO BATES 

Maine and Colby are Victims of 
Aggie Forensic Artists. 

Hates College, with its national cham- 
pion debating team, succeeded in uphold- 
ing the honor of Maine by giving the 
M.A.C. team its first defeat of the HMN 
here last Saturday afternoon, after M.A. 
C. had unanimously defeated two other 
Maine colleges on the two preceding 
(I ays. The first to fall was the 1'niversity 
of Maine at Orono on Thursday and the 
second was Colhy at W'aterville on Friday. 

Although Bates won a 3 to victory, 
the debate was far from being one-sided. 
Both teams had well-planned arguments 
u|>on which to base their reasoning but 
the Bates team had the superior delivery. 
The subject under discussion was "Re- 
solved, that the house favors the entrance 
of the United States into the World 
Court". M.A.C, with its veteran group 
of debaters, Eliot P. Dodge '26, Ralph 
W. Haskins '27, and Herman E. Pickens 
'27, upheld the negative. Bates was also 
represented by one senior and two 
juniors: Harold H. Walker '26, Fred T. 
(ioogins '27, and F'rederic H. Young '27. 
President Edward M. Lewis occupied the 
chair as the presiding officer. The judges 
were Professor S. L. Garrison, Professor 
Richard S. Meriam, and Professor George 
F. Whicher, all from Amherst College. 
The debate was conducted on the Ameri- 
can Plan, each speaker having 12 minutes 
in which to deliver his presentation speech 
and 6 minutes for his rebuttal. 

Represented by the same team, M.A.C. 
won its debates from the University of 
Maine and Colby both by a 3 to decision. 
The question in debate in which M.A.C. 
took the affirmative, was "Resolved, that 
Congress should pass uniform marriage 
and divorce laws." The debate with 
Colby was conducted on the American 
Plan but that with the University of 
Maine on the Oxford Plan. Under the 
Oxford system, each speaker uses extem- 
poraneous delivery and is allowed 16 
minutes for his rebuttal and constructive 
argument. 



PROMISING FUTURE 
FOR MUSICAL CLUBS 

Recent Successes May Mean Exten- 
sion of Season. Perform Here Next 
Week. 

The successful eastern tour of the 
Musical Clubs has resulted in a clamor 
for more concerts in places near Boston. 
At least five tentative offers have been 
made, and it seems probable that another 
week-end trip may be made next term. 
It has not been customary in recent 
years for the clubs to take the road after 
the winter term, but so great is the 
enthusiasm among the men this year, 
that only faculty approval will be neces- 
sary to insure an extended season. 

On Saturday, March 13, the clubs will 
give a combined concert with the Girls' 
Glee Club in Stockbridge Hall. There 
will be dancing afterward in the Memorial 
Building for members of the clubs and 
their guests. A combined concert with 
the Northfield Seminary (dee Club is 
also planned for next month. 



SHULTIS PRESENTS COLLEGIAN 
WITH ANOTHER GIFT 



Prominent Alumnus gives Subscrip- 
tion in Memory of Prof. Hasbbouck. 



Newton Shultis '96, has presented the 
Collegian with a ten year subscription 
to the Kingston Freeman, published at 
Kingston, N. Y. This is the second gift 
which the Board has received from Mr. 
Shultis, the other being a copy of "A 
Biographical Sketch of Alexander John- 
ston Cassatt", and is made in memory of 
the late Philip Bevier Hasbrouck. Mr. 
Shultis and Professor Hasbrouck were 
both natives of Ulster County, N. Y., 
and came to M.A.C. at alxnit the same 
time, Professor Hasbrouck as a teacher 
and Mr. Shultii as a student. 



BASEBALL NOTICE 



All candidates for Vanity DMC 
ball, report at the Drill Hall at 
4 o clock, Thursday, March 4. 

All freshmen who are coming 
out for manager of baseball should 
see Davis as soon as |>ossible and 
should Ik- at the Drill Hall alter 
Assembly today or at 4 o'clock 

Thursday. 



HOCKEY TEAM WILL 
LOSE THREE REGULARS 



Pucksters Conclude Season With 
Four Games Unplayed Because of 
Poor Ice. 



The hockey team met its last foe and 
emerged triumphant when they journcved 
to Amherst center and faced the photogra- 
pher last Tuesday. There were no serious 
injuries to the players although it was 
rumored that their opiKments did not fen 
as well. This trip concludes an otherwise- 
very creditable season, one in which 
handicaps have l>een encountered, but 
which has bean the most successful in 
recent years. Although four games of an 
excellent schedule were cancelled on 
account of warm weather and lack of ice, 
the team was able to play eight others, 
three of which resulted in victories, and 
one, a scoreless tie. 

The team loses three excellent men in 
Captain "Buddy" Moberg, "Red" Potter, 
and "Dinty" Palmer, whose work for the 
last two years have been of the highest 
order. "Buddy" has proved most elusive 
to all his opponents on the ice, and "Red" 
has developed into a clever defense man, 
a position to which he was shifted this 
year. Palmer, the ever-dependable goalie, 
leaves a gap which will l>e hard to fill, for 
his consistent work has saved the Agates 
a great deal of worry. There remains a 
promising nucleus of four candidates for 
next year, however, in "Ducky" Swan, 
"Joe" Forest, "Abie" Abrahamson, and 
(Continued on Pa** 2) 



Drawings by Farnum 

Shown in "M" Building 

Newspaper Sketches by Springfield 
Republican Artist Show Scenes in 
City of Homes. 



The current exhibit in the Memorial 
Building consists of 50 original drawings 
by Mr. John Farnum, staff artist of the 
Springfield Republican. These pictures 
have ban appearing regularly in the 
columns of the Republican where doubt- 
less many readers have remarked on their 
artistic excellence. They include the 
very interesting set of sketches entitled 
"About Town" specially drawn for the 
Sftnday issues. While they represent the 
swift work of a hurried newspaperman , 
they everywhere show clean lines, first 
class structural composition, and a vivid 
report of the scene. They are mainly 
charcoal sketches with some pen drawings. 
These pictures naturally have a strong 
local interest because of the proximity of 
Springfield to Amherst. 

This exhibition has been specially 
loaned to Prof. Frank A. Waugh, and 
will be in place for about two weeks. 



RESOLUTIONS 



Whereas, it is evident that the fresh- 
men are willfully abandoning the tradi- 
tions of the college, and, 

Whereas, the college Senate has been 
divested of all its power of action over 
the freshmen, and, 

Whereas, we feel that the freshmen 
should abide by these traditions, 

Be it resolved, that we, the Sophomore 
Secret Society for the Enforcement of 
Freshmen Rules, shall take into our own 
hands the punishment of freshmen who 
are guilty of infringement on the rules 
laid down by the sophomore class, 

Be it further resolved, that any 
freshmen who are repotted for disobeying 
the rules after March 8, 1MB, shall be 
treated in accordance with the rule-, 
established by this committee. 

By- 

The Sophomore Secret Society for 

the Enforcement of Freshmen 

Rtlle- 



Agates Score 20-12 

Over Mai. e 



Temple and Jones Star in Loose Game. 

Only Three Floor Baskets Made in First Half 



AGATES WIND UP 
SEASON TONIGHT 



Victory is Expected in Contest with 
Tufts at Medford. 



The Agates' last game will Ik- played 
tonight at Medford when they meet the 
Tufts five. Tufts should Ik- a victim for 
the Maroon and White, but Tufts teams 
have seemed to have a faculty for coming 
back after mediocre seasons and defeating, 
or at least pressing hard, Aggie teams in 
the last few years. With the slump in 
the Aggies' work recently there should lie 
no ovei confidence in the Aggie camp 
before this last contest. 

Records show, however, that Tufts has 
not shown up as well against the leading 
teams in the New England colleges as 
have the M.A.C. quintet. Tufts have 
outscored Northeastern twice, M.I.T., 
Wesleyan, Clark, Middlebury, and 
Lowell Textile; but they failed to defeat 
Holy Cross, B. 17., Worcester Tech, 
Brown, and New Hampshire. Their 
biggest feat was in holding Springfield 
to 29 to 27 with an overtime session. 
They started the season with a series of 
wins, but when they struck three hard 
teams in a row they came out with an 
average of .000 for the trio. Again they 
scored three straight wins over Clark and 
Middlebury, whom the Agates beat al- 
though in the throes of an off-day, and 
Lowell Textile. But after these contests, 
the Jumbonians suffered a relapse from 
which they have not yet emerged, al- 
though the last game, with New Hamp- 
shire, was only a 29 to 22 loss. The 
record of the Medford team in a nut sheel, 
including the games with non-collegiate 
rivals during the Christmas vacation 
shows eight wins and ten defeats to date. 
Captain Dowson and French are the 
outstanding scorers for the Brown and 
Blue this season. Dowson, although a 
back field man, is an accurate marksman, 
while F'rench plays basket ball as he plays 
every other sport, — he gets results. 



Fraternity League 

Season Nears Close 



Lambda Chi Alpha Meets Alpha 
Camma Rho to Decide Champion- 
ship. 



With only a few games left to play in 

the interfraternity basketball league, 

Lambda Chi Alpha and Alpha < .am ma 

Rho seem assured of leadership in their 
(Continued on Page 3) 



NEW AG. EC. COURSE TO 

BE GIVEN NEXT TERM 



Three-Credit Course will Deal with 
Economics of Consumption. 



Acting President Lewis has approved a 
course on the economics of consumption, 
which will be given in the spring term. 
This course, an elective for juniors and 
seniors, will be given by Dr. A. E. Cance 
and Miss M. J. Foley of the department 
of agricultural economics. The course 
will deal with the importance of the 
consumers in shaping modern business 
and industry; social welfare as it is 
related to rational consumption; the 
advantages and disadvantages of various 
types of saving; wise investments — in 
general, the management of income. The 
course, to be known as Agricultural 
Economics 54, will be given, for three 
credits, at eleven o'clock, Monday, 
Wednesday, and Friday. 



MISS KOCH TO SPEAK 



Miss Katharine Koch, landscape an hi 
tect, will address the Lands* ape ( 'bib on 
Thursday evening, March 11, at 7 p. m., 
in Room II, French Hall. 

Miss Koch will give a lantern slide 
lecture on the subject "Historic Italian 

Garden*." All who are Interested arc 
invited to attend. 



llu- Mass. \ K nie basket, ers, in their 

last punt on home territory, aoorad ■ 

win over the Maine c|uintet, L*0 to 12, in 
a loose game. In the hist halt only three 
baskets were made and the semi- stood 
."> to "{ at the end of the period. Both 
Hams had off-days, shooting and passing 
inaccurately. Then- was much clashing 
macllv around during the period but it 
seemed to Ik- without avail. 

Larry Jones scored the first |M>int with 
a free try. The Agates succeeded in 
taking the ball awav Irom tin- Pine Tree 
Staters frequently, but their passing and 
shooting was not indicative of their 
previous high calibre. Hanscom scored 
ncM from under the basket; but flashy 
passing enabled ( iritfin to recapture the 
lead for the- Maroon and White. Temple 
widened the margin by a pretty toss from 
the foul line. The Maine left forward 
added the other point by a foul shot 
before the half ended. 

The second half showed better offensive 
work on the part of the home team, and 
in the closing minutes the Aggies' five 
man offense functioned effectively. Tem- 
ple started the tallying with a one hand 
shot; Lake followed with another single 
bander; Smiley scored while cutting under 
the Iwsket; and Temple added another 
|K»int from the foul line. ( iriffin followed 
in successfully and an exchange of foul 
shots brought the count to 13-0. Temple 
cut under the basket for the fifteenth 
point and Branscom duplicated the act 
for Maine. Griffin figured again with 
another follow-in act and Branscom 
added three more to the visitors' end of 
the score, bringing the count to 18-10. 
Partenheimer contributed the last M.A.C. 
basket and l>oth teams added a single 
point before the finish. 

Temple, considering that he was feeling 
poorly, played an excellent game. Per- 
haps the man who contributed the most 
to the Aggies' success was the tall center, 
Larry Jones, who continued to outjump 
his opponent, and who played the bac k 
court to perfection. 

Olsson, who started for the first time 
this season, was outstanding for Maine, 
although Branscom figured prominently, 
offensively. 

The summary: 

Matt. A«al« H f. I' I' of Maine H. K. P 

Tt-miilr.iT '. I 7 HanKom.rli O 1 1 

Thomat.lf I) O Huu.ll.il. <l o O 

I'arK-nhrimrr.rf 1 2 Ota»n.!!i (I 1 ci 

K.U.ri O Bryant.ll> <) o o 

Jonra.c :j :» H.-.itt\.. n o o 

Seniley Jo I O 2 Branwom..- I () « 

< .UHaiicon.il> l_ikr.it 1 2 4 

Griffin. r I, I ft Kam'k'vitx.lf U 1 1 

Total 8 4 20 Total ~4 ~4 12 

Son- .it half time— Matt. Aggie .■>. Maine .'J. 
Referee — Whalen. Time — 20-ininiite halve*. 



TRACK TEAM RUNS 

AWAY FROM W. P. I. 



Sniffen is High Scorer in Annual 
Indoor Meet with Engineers. 



The Aggie track team decisively con- 
quered Worcester Tech by a score of 40 
to 2K in the annual indoor meet held at 
Worcester on February 27th. The M.A. 
C. squad came through with four first 
places and a tie for first as well as enough 
seconds and thirds to assure them a 
victory. In the high jump, the shotput, 
the quarter, and the half mile the Agates 
were particularly strong, placing at least 
one man besides taking a first. 

Captain Sniffen of M.A.C. and Thom- 
son of W. P.I., each high scorer for his 
team, were tied for first in the .'10 yard 
dash. Sniffen also came in ahead in the 
quarter mile event in which "Joe" 
Gttkfi of football fame had been expected 
to flash. "Dick" Foley barely missed 
getting a second in the half mile run, 
losing to Page- of Ted) by a scant foot. 

Coach Derby has sent la the entries of 
the relay squad, S< happellc, Hall, Henne- 
berry, Snyder, and Captain Sniffen for 
the 104th Regimental games at Spring- 
fn-lil this coming Sat urda) Tin- team will 
take part in the college' relay in which 

Springfield College and Williams arc also 
entered. 

The summary of the W.P.I, mec't : 

Mile run— Meigs <\\ . Sc ha ppe fle (If), 

(Continued on Page 3) 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY. MARCH 3, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH. 3. 1926 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Official newtpaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 
Mary T. Boyd '26 Editor-in-Chief 

Jqhn F. Lambert 26 Managing Editot 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 

Editorial Mary T. Boyd 26 

Oder Pr«M Ma" T. Boyd 26 

Athletics Will.am L. Dole 27 

Harold L. Clark 28 

L. Rockwkli. Smith. Jr. '28 

Campus Newi Ernest L. Spfncer 28 

Ellsworth Barnard '28 

Edward H. Nichols, '29 

William R. 1'wnney, 29 

Co-Ed News Frances C. Bruce '27 

Alumni Josephine Paniica '28 

Faculty Newi W. Gordon Hunter '29 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

*_»im G. Stevens '26 Buslneta Manager 

Charles P. Reed "26 Advertising Manager 

Lewis H. Whitaker '27 Circulation Manager 

' John E. White '27 

Douglas W. Lor in g '28 

Charles F. Clagg '27 

Edwin A. Wilder '28 



Subscription 12.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Pott Office. Accepted for mailing at ^Pec.al rate 
of postage provided for in sect.on 1103. Act of Oc- 
tober. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



No Chapels? 



Shall NikfC tli.'i-i'lh be compulsory? 
This is MM of the most diliatcd questions 
in the COlWge world today. All over the 
country straw votes arc being taken, even 
occasionally real votes, and the result is 
always the same; the students favor 
voluntary chapel, and the authorities 
insist that it continue to be compulsory. 
The reasons for the requiring of chapel 
attendance seem to be divided under two 
general heads. Some colleges require 
chapel because chapels were required by 
the pious gentlemen who founded the 
colleges and some colleges, the newer 
ones, require it because the requirement 
exists in the older colleges. The chief, 
point in its favor, according to the semi- | 
official statements of the authorities, — 
leaving aside the question of religion, 
which has very little to do with morning 
chapel exercises under the present condi- 
tions,— leaving aside this question of 
religion, char-el, it is argued, assembles 
the student body in a convenient place 
and at a convenient time, so that admoni- 
tory talks by the faculty may be given 
and so that notices may be read. 

It amounts to that, and it admits on 
the face of it defeat to the professed aims 
of a chapel exercise. Why even call it 
chapel? A once a week general assembly 
should give ample time for the reading 
of notices, and as to the admonitory 
talks! No one knows what they are all 
about ten minutes later anyway. 

Required chapel, however, like the well 
known brook, runs on forever in the 
colleges, in spite of student votes, resolu- 
tions, and petitions. Yale presents a 
striking example of this. So it is particu- 
larly interesting to know that one college 
has finally decided to try the experiment 
of voluntary chapel. Hiram College in 
Ohio, has turned over its chapels entirely 
to student managership. Attendance is 
not required. It is purely voluntary, it 
is truly religious, and the attendance is 
as large or larger than before. 

What students are objecting to, then, 
is the element of compulsion, which is 
in accord neither with the spirit of the 
times or the spirit of Christianity. If 
chapel is a true chapel, under student 
control so that the theological diet will 
be palatable to those who are to benefit 
by it, chapel will be supported. And the 
non-interested, who can never be legis- 
lated into interest or active participation, 
and who can certainly never be improved 
by the admonitory talks of the present 
regime are left free to sleep in peace. 
Hiram College has initiated an interesting 
experiment, in which all college students 
will be interested in wishing them luck. 



and the ostensible purposes of our atten- 
dance begin to function, either one of 
two things happens. Esther there is felt 
that compelling electrical force we call 
personality, or there is not. If there is, 
nothing need !«• said al>out tin- quality 
of our attention. We listen in silence, 
interest, and n < cpt iveness. If there is 
not, that the quality of attention is 
I strained is putting it mildly. 

There are only a few ways of relieving 
tedium while forming part of a Stock- 
bridge audience. Sleep, of course; the old 
ltaad-by. A very neat effect of disinterest 

may be secured by continued coughing, 

whispering, and a rhythmic semi con- 
verted shift -about to gaze incredulously 
at the dock. Or the cows' heads so 
appropriately framing the hall may bfl 
counted. Which, practically, exhausts 
the possibilities. After that, we frankly 
yawn, and when the s|xaker has con- 
cluded, over-applaud to prove that we 

are really very polite and attentive young 
people after all. If. of course, all this 
takes place at a Social Union, we will 
not 1r- present at this applauding stage. 
They tell us a good deal about the keen 
dean minds of youth; how youth instinc- 
tively searches out the Inst and makes ll 
its own. From observation, the fatuity 
of this seems obvious. Youth, apparently, 
has all the intellectual omnivority and 
the peculiarly delicate selectivity of a 
goat or an ostrich. Youth will swallow 
almost anything. Hut there are limits, 
and when it occasionally grows restless 
under some particularly unpalatable mor- 

m\ reproof is bom. 

The answer to all this is that we, the 
gnat ttUCkfl! body, are rapacious Imt 
not moronic. We respond to kind treat 
mint. Give us a man like Prof. Sharp, 
or a really good concert, and we will 
show ourselves appreciative of our privi- 
leges. Oive us less, and do not blame us 
for displayed impatience. Even a goat 
gets tired of tin cans after a time. 

It should be mentioned, however, that 
it is most discourteous to leave Social 
Unions in the obvious manner we do. 




A Senior's Lament 

I'm tired of sophomores 

Taking Zoo 
Who ask me things 

1 used to know: 
The double jointed words 

And things, 
The proper terms for 

Fins and wings; 
Do Hydras bud off 

( MM by one, 
And what's a 

l'aramoecium? 
And doe* a crawfish 

Bray or crow? 
Get out! Get out! 

1 used to know ! 
CP 



H27 INDEX PROGRESSING 

As a result of the work which was 
begun last spring the 1097 Index is 
rapidly assuming a tangible shape. Al- 
though the Index Hoard promises that 
the yearbook will be of a highly interest 
ing nature it will not give out any definite 
information as yet. The publication will 
contain fewer statistics and more artistic 
and literary material than heretofore. 
Pen and ink sketches by Angelo A. Merlini 
and A. Rodger Chamberlain will add a 
great deal to the year's Index. Articles 
of a semi-literary nature, concerning 
topics of class and college interest, have- 
also been included. 

Sophomore competition for the year- 
l>ook, which is being prepared under the 
supervision of Editor-in-Chief, Edward A. 
Connell, is still going on. Conditions for 
the Business Department will be called 
out very soon by Kenneth W. Milligan, 
Business Manager. 



Student Volunteers 

Meet This Week-End 



Busy Program Provided for Three- 
i_>ay Session of Future Missionaries. 



Attention ! 

We may quote airily, "The quality of 
mercy is not strained,'' and again, "It 
droppeth as the gentle dew from heaven," 
but what can be said for the quality of 
our attention?— for it is often heavily 
strained, and droppeth, possibly from 
heaven, in the manner of the gentle hail- 
stone, as a rule. 

When the student body gathers in the 
auditorium, from duty or from pleasure, 



The program for the Student Volunteer 
Convention this con ing week-end prom- 
ises to be especially interesting. For the 
sake of convenience, the first meeting is 
to be held Friday evening, March 5. in 
the First Congregational Church. These 
attending will register at this meeting. A 
supper will be served and will be followed 
by a short musical entertainment by three 
musicians from Amherst and M.A.C. 
Dr. Daniel J. Fleming of Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary will give the opening 
address, following the supper, on "Mis- 
sionary Enterprise Today". There will 
be delegation meetings of the different 
colleges after the address. 

All the activities for Saturday are to 
take place in Stockbridge Hall. At 9 
there will be devotional exercises. At 
9.15 Mrs. Frederick B. Bridgman will 
speak on "Missionary Work in Primitive 
Lands". Prof. Ralph Harlow of Smith 
College will give an address at 10 o'clock 
on "Missionary Work in Lands Where 
Christian Teaching is Proscribed". There 
will be an address from 10.10 to 12.15, 
the subject and speaker to be announced. 
Lunch will be served in the cafeteria 
from 12.20 to 1.00. 

In the afternoon there will be devotion- 
al exercises led by Dr. Robert Wilder at 
1.30. At 1.45 there will be brief addresses 
by the Church Board secretaries on 
"Qualifications for Missionary Woik'. 
Dr. Fleming at .'3 o'clock, will again 
address the delegation, his topic being, 
"Missionary Work in Lands of Indigenous 
Civilization". From 4.20 on will be a 
period of recreation. In the evening, at 
7 o'clock, a banquet will be served in 
Draper Hall, which will be followed by 
two addresses and by delegation meet- 
ings. 

On Sunday morning the conference is 
to attend Sunday Chapel. Charles Hum y 
will speak on "The Foreign Student and 
Ourselves" at 10.15. From 2.50 to 4.30, 
delegation meetings will be in order in 
Memorial Hall. A discussion will follow 
each address, in which anyone may take 
part. Each speech will be followed by a 
rest period. Anyone may attend these 
meetings, and it is hoped that many- 
students will take advantage of this 
privilege. 

There will be about ninety representa- 
tives from sixteen educational institutions 
of the Connecticut Valley at the conven- 



Sharp-Shooting 

We are so hardened to being desig- 
nated .is "the inmates", —no, that's 
wrong, pardon us,— as "The men and 
women students of this institution," that 
is something more than refreshing to have 
an addresser say to us, the addressees,: 
"In shaking before this— (pause)— this 
— " and then a huge wave of laughter 
drowned the rest. Exactly, Mr. Sharp, 
and "this" appreciated your candour! 

Also we liked the sentence, "When a 
man puts his hard-earned money into a 
book you needn't worry atxmt him, 
unless it's a textbook." Do copies of 
Elinor Cdyn count in that, maybe? Or 
collected editions of Kipling's verse? 
Anyway, here's something even nicer: 
"It's where you stand in college that 
counts— no matter how still you stand." 
We have a feeling that to have classes 
under the perpetrator of that would be 
slightly difficult, and that the usual 
"Sorry, sir, but l haven't my theme 
written. 1 was sick this week." or —what's 
that other one?— or "Not prepared. 
Someone must have taken my book," 
would call forth something more interest- 
ing than soothing. 

Did you turn and look at the co-eds 
when he pullefl thai one about "the 
ordinary squealing kind of female"? 
Maybe, maybe— but any member of the 
Hort. classes in garter snake season can 
tell you more about the typical feminine 

reaction. 

Mr. Sharp illustrated perfectly the old 
one about the sugar-coated pill slipping 
down easiest: in this case the pill being 
perfectly applicable suggestions, and tie 
sugar pure humor; and we're willing to 
wager ten quarts of cider fresh from the 
press that we'll be remembering Mr. 
Sharp's ideas when many assorted re- 
marks on How to be a Rotary Club 
Secretary and the like have sunk into well 
deserved oblivion. 

CP 

Extrn ! 
"Hoof and Mouth Disease Now Well in 
Hand."— Newspaper headline. 
Gosh, what next! 

CP 

Incidentally— 
Prof. Julian (in chapel, about our 
schedules):— The Schedule Room is un- 
avoidably a little behind in their work 
this term, so you'll have to make up the 
time for us. 

"Professor, how could you?" Don t 
give our instructors such ideas— sugges- 
tions are sometime as unpleasantly catch- 
ing as Springfield measles! 
CP 



HOCKEY TEAM WILL LOSE 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Paul Frese. The record of the team 
follows: 

M.A.C. Opp. 

M. I. T. : * 

Hamilton i 5 

R. P. I. 2 1 

Amherst 

Middlebury 1 



TRACK TEAM RUNS 

(Continued on Page 2) 
Pearson (W). Time, 4 min. 58 4 -."> mi 

3(1 yd. dash Thomson (W) and Sniffen 
(M) tied for first, Mahoney (Mi, third. 
Time. 4 sec. 

3") yard hurdles — Thomson (W), 
Thompson (hi), Hall (M), Time, 4 -:<:> 
sec. 

High jump— Tucker (M), Q«*ry (W), 
Hall (M). Height, oft. Sin. 

Shot put— Dresser (Mi, Thurlow M 
Dix (W). Distance. 34 ft. 10 5-8 in. 

440 yard run— Sniffen (hi), Hall \l 
Gttldi <Wi. Time, 60 l-osec. 

SKI) yard run — Schappelle (M , Pay 
(W), Foley (II). Time, 2 min. 17 2-8 

Relay race — Won by Tech (Carpenter, 
Millrum, Cuidi, Thomson), M.A.C. to 
ond (SchapiR-lle, Snyder, Hall, Sniffen. 
Time, 3 min. 14 1-5 sec. 



Army 2 

New Hampshire 3 

Williams 




What IS College Coming. To? 

Truro, N. S. — Co-eds at the provincial 
normal school must wear skirts that 
reach a point one quarter the distance 
from the kneecaps to the ankles. The 
faculty has delegated a woman to measure 
suspects. 

CP 

Famous Snows 

1. nice. 

2. use. 

;j. way to answer me. 

4. quiz today (rare) 

5. telling! 

6. fun working. 

7. trouble at all. 

8. place like home! 

CP 

And that's that! 



tion. The men students will be provided 
lodging in the fraternity houses. The 
girls will Ire distributed among the 
homes of the faculty. It is hoped that 
the stutlents of M.A.C. will show the 
uttermost courtesy toward the visitors. 



AGGIE MUSICAL CLUBS 

(Continued from Page 1) 
their way once more, spending the day 
in Worcester and reaching Stow in the 
afternoon. The concert there was given 
in the town hall, and was sponsored by 
the alumni of that district. After having 
supper in the hall, the men climbed into 
their uniforms and proceeded to "do their 
stuff" in as good fashion as ever before. 
Again they danced until midnight, and 
again they stayed at private homes for 
the night. It is interesting to note that 
Carlton T. Smith '18, writer of "Here's 
to Thee My Alma Mater", which the 
glee club is singing this year, is a native 
of Stow. 

The following morning saw the wander- 
ing musicians once more on the road. 
They reached Auburndale at noon, and 
spent the afternoon at theatres in Wal- 
tham. The concert was presented under 
the auspices of the Auburndale Club, at 
the club house, to a capacity audience. 
It had been advertised as "the biggeu 
event of the season", and Aggie's musical 
representatives saw to it that no one was 
disappointed. Every act was practically 
letter perfect. The glee club has never 
functioned better within the memory of 
those now in college. "Ted" Grant, 
performing before a familiar crowd, re- 
ceived a rousing ovation. "Dutch" 
Ansell was popular as ever, and "Jim" 
Bower's piano solo was a worthy addition 
to the program. The orchestra played 
for dancing afterward, and refreshments 
were served. A number of men were able 
to go to their homes after the concert, 
and the rest enjoyed the hospitality of 
members of the Auburndale Club — and 
when we say "enjoyed" we don't mean 
perhaps! 

The bus returned Sunday morning, the 
two cars following in the afternoon. No 
real accident had occurred on the trip, 
when the bus got within a mile of Amherst. 
Then a sedan, speeding on the narrow 
road, crashed into one side of the bus. 
The latter was uninjured, however, 
"Rocky" Smith's suit-case acting as a 
bumper. Hardly had Ed Sarazen pro- 
ceeded another hundred yards when a 
Ford coupe duplicated the action of the 
sedan, and Rocky 's suit-case was com- 
pletely demolished. But that wasn't all, 
—for while the owner of the Ford was 
discussing the high cost of suit-cases, a 
touring car of the same vintage came 
along, and succeeded in removing sone 
more paint from the coupe. The rest of 
the journey was quite uneventful. 

It is safe to say that Aggie's Musical 
Clubs have never in the history of the 
college had a more successful concert 
tour. And it is also highly probable that 
such a trip is as good advertising for the 
college as an athletic contest. 

Those making the trip were: glee club, 
Norcross, Bower, H. Bartlett, Lambert, 
Loud. Baumgartner, Campbell, Day, 
Owers, C. Parsons, Spooner. Stratton, 
Alberti. Estes. Fonseca, Mills, E. Richard- 
son, Dow, Burnham, Crant, Holling- 
worth. Lane, and Richter; orchestra. 
Ansell. Bray, Canney. L R. Smith. 
Ronton, White and Farwell; Whitaker. 
manager, and William I. Goodwin 18, 
faculty representative. 



rOO Yard Dash 
or Marathon? 

For some the race is long, for 
others short. But long or 
short, the Life Income Plan 
helps. 

If death comes and you drop 
out early, the Plan provides 
$10,000 for your family. 
Whenever you're disabled, it 
pays you $100 a month. 
\t you live to old age, it pays 
you $100 a month for life. 
Whatever the future, the Plan 
fits your needs. Inquire. 

Connecticut General 



Life I nsuran'.e Company 
ROY D. HARRIS 

P. O. Box 273 Tel. Greenfield 1873-M 
Greenfield, Mass. 




WRIGLEVS 

gannw jmm More 
Mm mm for 
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any money 




TUTORING 



Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated In blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda Chi Alpha House. Tel. .US* 




To serve the discriminating college trade many prominent authorities co-ordi- 
nate with Scheyer, year after year, in designing and creating new styles. 

SCHEYER TAILORED means the highest type of fine hand workmanship. 

New shipments every day. —WALSHIZATION PAYS 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

The Rest in Drug Store Service 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 

IS AT 

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College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



NORTHAMPTON 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 



Paul Hansell presents 

The Northampton Repertory Company 

— THIS WEEK — 

•The Truth About Blayds" 

By A. A. Milne A Good Play 

Next Week 

"JUST MARRIED" 

By Atlclainde Matthew* and Ann Nichols 
A Popular Farce Comedy 

Evenings at 8.15 Sat. Mat. at 2.15 

Trices: 50c. to $1.10. (including tax) 

l'hone 43.J 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

The only place in town where you DM 
buy Columbia and Brunswick Phono 
graphs and Records Sotnthing new every 
week. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHERST BANK 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



FRATERNITY LEAGUE SEASON 
(Continued from Page I) 

respective divisions, and will pn>lul>l\ 
play for the ohanipionship this week. 

There is a possibility thai n IV. ma) 

tie Lambda CM Alpha in one division. 
The Standings t«» dOte are as follows: 

Train II. /.. PC. 

L. C. A. .*> Q 1 (MM) 

A. (.. K. ti I) I (MM) 

S. P. K. 4 1 800 

Q. T. V. 4 1 800 

T. (". 8 2 000 

k. i;. 13 a mo 

1). P. A. I 8 400 

AT. G. 8 8 uhi 

A. S. P. 2 4 383 

I'. S. K. 8 4 333 

K. K. * 1 4 900 

K. S. 1 8 107 

K. G. P. 1 5 Hi7 

N. K. 1 8 167 



JAMES A. LOWELL 



BOOKSELLER 



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attractively bound - 90c each 



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EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



UNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



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On* of In* powtr amplifier «'«£«•• of In* 
world * firtt *up*r-pow*r tran*mitt*r 



Antenna of tup*r- power transmitter 




From the »tudio of WGY in 
Schenectady, six miles from the 
developmental station, there 
may be controlled a great 
number of transmitters, one of 
which is the first super-power 
transmitter in the world. 
WGY, together with its associ- 
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A new series of G-E advertise- 
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The World's 
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On the rolling plains of South Schenectady, in 
several scattered buildings, is a vast laboratory for 
studying radio broadcasting problems. Gathered 
here are many kinds and sizes of transmitters, from 
the short-wave and low-power sets to the giant 
super-power unit with a 50- to 250-kilowatt voice. 

Super-power and simultaneous broadcasting on 
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among the startling later-day developments in 
radio. And even with hundreds of broadcasting 
stations daily on the air throughout the land, these 
latest developments stand for still better service 
to millions of listeners. 

Only five years old, yet radio broadcasting has 
developed from a laboratory experiment into a 
mighty industry. And alert, keen young men have 
reaped the rewards. 

But history repeats itself. Other electrical develop- 
ments will continue to appear. And it will be the 
college man, with broad vision and trained mind, 
who will be ready to serve and succeed. 



GENERAL ELECTRIC 



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SCHENBCTADY 



NEW TOR 



FREE 
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SERVICE for 
FOUNTAIN PENS 



FRATERNITY STATIONERY 

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The New College Store 



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SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

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BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 

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SI. 00 SI .39 $1«'3 I Our new shoes have arrived and it would pay you to drop in and look them over 

^ V T ■ KNOX'S at . . $8.00 

exeter CARL H. BOLTER 

AMHERST 



SPECIAL THINGS 

for 
Special Students 



SING LEE HAND LAUNDRY 
No. 1 Main St., Amherst, Mass 

Our laundry First Class 

Our Policy Guaranteed) 

REPAIRING AND ALL KINDS OP 
WASHING DONE AT REASONABLE 
PRICES. 

Opposite Poet Office 



G.Edward Fisher 



NETTLETON'S 
HYANNIS 



from $12.50 up 



I 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH. 3, 1926 



Town Hall, Amherst 


Wed. 
Thurs. 

S.M. 

7.30 


Thomas Mflfth.ui and l.ols 
WIlHun In 

•IRISH LUCK." 
from the Sat. Kve. Poal story 
The bent picture Meifthun 
Iiiih made In many months. 
A blft heart-appeallntt story 
actually made In Ireland. 
New> Fables Mack Sennett 

Comedy 


Friday 

3.00 
6.45, 8.30 


Jacqueline login & Cullen 
l.andis In 

"PEACOCK FKATIIKRS" 
Temple Bailey's sensational 
novel llodtle I'odfte. 

Charles Chase Comedy 


Saturday 

3.00 
6.45 8.30 


Hoot Clh.-ion in 
"THE CALGARY STAM- 
PBDB" 

Including the thrills and 
stunts photographed at the 
Calttary rodeo champion- 
ship. Magntncent! Aston- 
ishing! Incomparable! 
News Comedy 


Mon. 

300 
6.45 8.30 


Reginald Denny. Pauline 
(.'.iron, Marlon Niion, 
Tyrone Power and Chester 
Conklln in 

"WI1ERK WAS 1 ?" 
Moves rapidly, with many 
funny situations. 
Path Review 2 reel Comedy 



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WHOLESOME FOOD! 
VISIT AND PERCEIVE 

YE AGGIE INN 



CLEANLINESS! 



You will find an excellant 

. . . SHOK REPAIRING SHOP ... 
equipped with the most up-to-date Goodyear 
Machinery and a modern 
SHOE SHINING PARLOR 
at Hi Amlty-St.. - Labrovlta Block 

We understand your requirements and are pre- 
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All work guaranteed. ShotM shtned and djti. 
VINCENT GRANDONICO. Prop. 



Worthy Hill Engaged 

To Play for Prom 

Seven-Piece Orchestra has Proved 
Popular In College*. 




Grange Grocery Store 

GOOD THINGS 
TO EAT 

We carry the best in everything 

David Grayson -.Adventurer 
THE NEW PAMPHLET 

— BY— 

Walter Dyer 
10 CENTS 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

San Tox Scientific Tooth Brush—small size, proper curve to handle. Bij 
pointed bristle tufts to clean between the teeth. Widely spaced tufts to 

insure quick drying. Sets to the hand to get at places. Constructed 
of selected bristles so firmly anchored, that perfect service is guaranteed. 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



The "AGGIE" 

A Spring Style in the new 

Black and Tan 

Leathers 

$5.00 to $10.00 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

INCORPORATED 

275 High St. Holyoke 



MISS CUTLER'S 
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Open till 8 P. M 



Worthy Hill and his 7-piece band will 
play for the I'romsters at the Junior Prom 
Dance on April 16. It is the quality of 
the music that makes for a good time, and 
therefore the committee has spared no 
expense in getting the best. 

In collegiate circles Worthy Hill has 
become very popular. A few weeks ago 
he played at the Mt. Holyoke College 
Prom where his music was highly applau- 
ded. This same 7-piece team is furnishing 
music for the Proms at Smith, Trinity, 
VYcsleyan, and Connecticut College. 

The prelims for the Prom which are 
now on sale will be limited because of 
floor space. They may be obtained from 
any member of the Junior Prom Com- 
mittee. 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 

for those who appreciate better Shoe Rebuilding 

ALSO HATS AND GLOVES CLEANED 

DAMERST & DEACON. Propi. 



Thursday evening, March 4, the Flori- 
culture Club will hold a card party and 
dance in French Hall. 



— JACKSON & CUTLER — 

DEALERS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

AMHERST. MASS. 



READY TO WEAR 



SHOES OF SERVICE 
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LAMBDA CHI ALPHA HOUSE 




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AMHERST 



TALK about "alliteration's artful aid" ... the 
printer certainly raided the "p" box that trip. 
But let that go! The advice is just as serious and 
sound as though it were couched in the careful 
diction of an English prof. 

Just get yourself a jimmy-pipe and fill the 
bowl to the brim with Prince Albert. Light up, 
and let the first fragrant whiff tell you that no 
other tobacco is like P. A. — or can be! Cool 
and sweet and fragrant, P. A. has everything a 
fellow ever wished for in a smoke. 

P. A. can't bite your tongue or parch your 
throat. The Prince Albert process settled that 
in P. A.'s freshman year. Get yourself a tidy 
red tin of Prince Albert today. The first load-up 
will tell you why pipes are so fashionable among 
young men today. 

>RINGE ALBERT 

—no other tobacco is like it! 




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$$t Aagaarlinartta dalUutatt 



Vol. xxxvi, 



AMHERST, MASS., FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 1926 



No. 20 



Missionary Conference 

Draws Large Delegation 

Fifteen Colleges Represented by 180 Delegates at Meeting 

Held Here Last Week-end. 



MAC. was the host this last wtek-end 
,,l . ,1.0111 180 students who attended the 

Connecticut Valley Intercollegiate Mis 

-luiiary Union Conference, held on this 
,.11111 us. The conference began Friday 
evening and ended Sunday afternoon. 
Smith College with '$7 delegate? had the 
latest delegation present, although Mt. 
Holyoke College was a dost- ■seen 1 arith 

•jegatee. Yale was well represented 

with 30 men. The other representative* 

(l nif from Amherst College, Ucrkely 

Divinity School, Connecticut College for 

Women, Hartford Theological Seminary, 

Harvard University, Middlebury Co ll eg e , 

Mt. Herman Seminary, Xorthfield Sem- 
inary, Springfield College, University of 
Vermont, Wesleyan College, qnd Williams 
College. 

On Friday night a hanquet was served 
ll the First Congregational Church which 
was followed by a social period. Dr. D. 
I, Fleming, professor of missions at I'nion 
Theological Seminary gave the opening 
address of the conference. He spoke on 
The Mission Enterprise Today." S. 
Ralph Harlow, Professor of Bible Study 
at Smith College, and Reverend VY. P. 
Shell. Home Secretary of the Presby- 
terian Church Board, were the speakers 
on Saturday morning Mr. Harlow's 
■object was "Mission Work in Lands 
Where Christian Teaching is Prosc rib ed." 
Reverend W. P. Schell gave an interest 
ing discussion of the problems facing 
students who are not planning on Chris- 
tian work as a life-work. 

Reverend Charles D. Hurrey. general 
vrrctary of the committee on friendly 
Relations among Foreign Students, gave 
the opening address on Saturday after- 
noon. His subject was. "Missionary 
Work in Countries Dominated by Catholi- 
,!-in." "Missionary Work in Lands of 
llinh Indiginous Civilization," was the 
■object of the second address Saturday 
Continued on Page 2; 



All House Dances 

Cancelled Last Week 



Phi Sift Escapes Ban by Holding 
Partv Week Before. 



In compliance with a request made b) 
President Lewis, those fraternities which 

■ere to have had house parties last week- 
end decided to cancel their dances. 

Lambda CW Alpha, Theta Chi. Alpha 

i Phi, Sigma Phi Epstkm, and Alpha 

Gamma Rho were the fraternitiee which 

had planned to hold their parties on that 
Phi Sigma Kappa held their house 

dance the week before last and cense 

OBeatly were more fortunate in their 
choice of a date. About twenty couplei 
•ere present. The girls came from 
Springfield, Sunderland, Mt. Holyoke. 
Smith, Amherst. South Hadlcy, and the 
Abbey. Miss Christopher war- the local 
chaperon and Miss Miller was the chaper- 
"i from Mt. Holyoke. "Kddie" Haertl 
"id his orchestra furnished the music. 
Refreshment! were served in Draper Hall. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



Crafty men condemn studies, 
simple men admire them, and 
uise men use them. 

— Francis Bacon 



Friday— 
'•00 p. m. Social I'nion Concert: 

Peerlesa Quintet. 
S-30 p. m. Maroon Key Society 
Dance. 
Saturday — 
'•00 p. m. Concert by combined 

Musical Clubs. 
Varsity Debate: I'niv. of Kansas, 
here. 
Sunday — 

a, m. Chapel. Sermon by Rev. 
I rank W. Padelford. Board of 

I duration of the N o r ther n Bap- 
tist Convention, N< w York City. 
Monday— Friday 
Final examinations, 



LL of N.H. Adopts 
Wildcat Mascot 



Students Vote to be Called Wildcats 
Instead of Bulls. 



The University of New Hampshire now 

boasta an authorized mascot, according 

to a recent account in The New Hampshire 
the student weekly, published at Durham. 
The ( iranite Staters will hereafter In- 
known as "I he Wildcats." 

Voting was inaugurated with a view to 
changing the old nickname of "Bull" to 
"Wildcat." The majority of the students 
were in favor of the adopted appellation, 
but decision was sus|>cnded by the 
Student Council until the Alumni gave 
their approval. One of the organizations 
whose sentiment swayed the sentiment of 
many was the N. H. Club, which is com 
posed solely of men who earned their 
letters in some form of athletics while at 
New Hampshire. 

The exact count of the balloting was as 
follows: Wildcats, .'{42; Bulls M8; Huskies 
81; Wolves 27; and Kagles 2.'f. Notes 
were cast for the Hawk, Caterpillar, Flea, 
and the Mustang. Strange as it may 
seem, one vote was polled for the favored 
Co-eds. Some of the students, 14 in 
number, were in favor of having no 
mascot chosen. 

New Hampshire now ranks with the 
"Black Panthers" of Middlebury, and 
the "Jumbos" of Tufts. On the whole, 
however, there seems to lie a shortage of 
appropriate fertxious animals among the 
smaller colleges of New England. A few 
years ago Aggie sported her "White 
Rata," but that term is not one likely to 
intimidate a doughty foe. How about a 
real mascot for Aggie.' 



Co-eds Have Good 

Influence at N. C. 



North Carolina Men Should Dress 
Better as Result of Many Co-eds. 



Became of its increasing number of 

nirls, the North Carolina State College 
RlSy have I" tM organized as .1 real 00 
educational institution. This movement 
is favored by several professors of the 
campus who are graduates ot co-edtica 
tional institutions. 

The Technician continues: "Doubtless 
an increase in m em bers <>l Ixith tests 
will have a good effect on each. This 

would tend to eliminate certain criticisms 
that have been made as to State student'- 

not always making a-- "smart" an appear- 
ance as men of other colleges. On the 
whole, the co-eds will have a good in- 
fluence, and it is believed that the co-eds 

will be beneficially influenced, too." 

— The New Hampshire. 



Principal Tells 
Story of Ashley 



Frank Boyden Gives Inspiring Ac- 
count of Bashful Boy who Became 
Hero. 



Principal Frank L. Boyden, of Deer- 
field Academy, at the Wednesday assem- 
bly, March I, told the inspiring story of 
Tom Ashley. Tom was an ordinary boy. 
a little bashful, and a hater of school. 
Through the whole of Tom's school life, 
he did not let social affairs become domi- 
nant with him. He was quiet. No one 
knew what he wanted to do. When Tom 
entered Amherst College, he immediately 
became a leader in sports. Although he 
was different than his classmates, he »a> 
loved by all who knew him. Tom left 
college very much the MUM as he came, 
outwardly. He was chosen to !*■ the 
principal of the most exclusive girl's 
school in America. When the war came, 
Tom wnt to do hi> bit. His company 
went OVer the top in one of the engage- 
(Contlnued on Page 3j 



Prof. Frandsen to 

Head Dairy Dept. 

Iowa Man is Editor of Journal of 
Dairy Science. 



Professor J. 11. Frandsen has been 

elected Head of the Departments of 

Dairying and Animal Husbandry at the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. 1'rof. 

Frandsen was reared on a farm in Iowa 

ami graduated from the Iowa State 
College, from which institution he has 
the degree <>f Master of Science, From 

1980 to 1904 he served as Assistant 

Chemist at the Iowa Experiment Station; 
from 1907-1911 he was associated with 

a commercial dairy at Portland, Oregon; 

from 1MI7-1911 he was in cha rge of the 

Dairy Department at the University ot 

Idaho; for ten years, from 1911, he 
served as Head of the 1 >cpartment of 
Dairy Husbandry at the I'niversity of 
Nebraska. In 1921 he became one of 
the editors of the Capper Farm Press 
and b ecame engaged in editorial work on 
many of the large and most influential 
farm papers of the middle west. In 1916 
he was influential in establishing the 
Journal of Dairy Science, the Inst periodi- 
cal of its kind published; of this he is 
still the editor. 

Professor Frandsen will assume the 
obligations of his new position approxi- 
mately April 1st. 



Debating Team Meets 

Fifth Opponant 

M.A.C. Will Debate University of 
Kansas on Child Labor Question. 



Tomorrow, March \'.i, the M.A.C. 
debating team will meet the I'niversity 
of Kansas in an intercollegiate debate, 
The Cniversily of Kansas team is making 
a tour of the Kastcrn part of the country 
during which it will debate with Boston 
I'niversity and Bates in addition to 
M.A.C. The debate will Ik- based on the 
Child Labor question M.A.C. which will 
U' represented by the same team as in 
the previous debates this season, will 
uphold the affirmative. 



Freshman Quintet 

Ends Good Season 



Yearlings Defeat Hopkins by Score 
of 23 — 9, While Losing to Cathedral 
by a Single Point. 



Final Contest of Aggie 

Quintet, 33 to 21 Win 

Abates End Season With Fourteenth Victory, Beating Tufts 

on Foreign Floor. 



Large Baseball 
Squad Reports 



Practice Held in Drill Hall. 
Divided Into Two Croups. 



Squad 



The freshman <|iiin(rt won a fast game 
from Hopkins Academy at tin Drill Hall 
last week and lost to Cathedral of Spring 
field l>\ one point. The Frosfa lx-.il ill" 

rladtey team 23-9 and lo>t to Cathedral 

liy a ! 7 is score. 

In the game with Hopkins good de- 
fence was shown by l>oth teams, the 
yearling guards holding their o p ponents 

to two basket-, from the lloor. The score 
at the end of the fitsl periixl was U I in 
favor of the frosh. 

Cathedral got the jump on the fresh 

men in the last game of the season by 
getting a 9 lead l.elore the M.A.C. team 
started scoring. At the end of the first 
half the score was 14-7 in favor of Cathe- 
dral. In the second half the frosh staged 
a game comeback and out scored their 
opponents 10-4. Tompkins was high 
scorer for the freshmen. 

Coach "Kd" Tumey's freshman basket- 
ball team has completed a very successful 
season, having won eight games and lost | 
only two. Both of the defeats were re- 
ceiver! on foreign floors, the first to 
Deerfield Academy by a score of 2d to :i2, 
and the second to Cathedral High School 
of Springfield by a score of 17 to 18. 
Victories were gained over Arms A c ade m y 
Northampton Commercial College, Hop 
kins Academy, and Attleboro, Turners 
Falls, Greenfield, and Arlington (Vt.) 
High Schools. 

The yearlings amassed a total of 297 
ixiints in comparison with 185 tallied by 
their opponents, but were especially pro- 
ficient in shooting floor goals, accounting 
for i:54 against the 72 looped by their 
enemies. 

Captain Webber led bis team in scoring 

by dropping in 41 double-deckers and <> 

foul shots for a total of 88 points. Cottkos 

was second with 63 counters, and OSS 

closely followed by Tompkins who securer] 

a total of 80. 

Continued on Page 2 



The Mass. Aggie baseball squad has 
been reporting in the Prill Hall for prac- 
tice for the past week. Most of the 

sessions have been devoted to batting 

practice and in ordci to handle the squad 

emcientry in the small quarters ofiered l>\ 
the Drill Hall the squad has bees divided 
into two groups. Each group has been 

reporting four times a week. In addition 

several pitchers have worked out in<li\ idti 

ally. There are about thirty men on the 
squad so far and more are expected as 
soon as the grippe has abated ami the 

basketball men recuperate. 

The first game is scheduled for the 
17th of April, so much of the ground work 
must be gone over indoors before the 

weather permits o utd oo r practice. The 

Agates are looking forward to a Mill 
schedule with some optimism. Although 
no team has been picked yet there is much 
gtxxl Material available. The Infield will 
probably Ik- picked from McVcy, Haertl, 
Moriarty, Cormier, ( aixuic, Kice, and 
Thompson. For the outfield |>ositions, 
there are Richards, Moberg, While, 
H.iinard. anil several others. 

The majority of the meetings this spring 
are on foreign territory. Then' are only 
five home games scheduled for the season 
and the game al I'ratt Field, Amherst, is 
the only near-by contest tebween May 0th 
and commencement. Among the trams 
which will lie met away are Dartmouth, 

Union, Middlebury, Vermont, and Men 

Hampshire. All of these teams will be 
among the liest in New Fngland. liase- 
ball has not the record to uphold that the 
football anrl basketball teams have had 
in the past two years but the nine should 
give a gr>od account of itself, from present 
i n< Ik at ions. 

TWO YEAR BASKETBALL 
TEAM WINS 8 GAMES 

Shorthorns Lose But Five (James 
Four of Which Were Away from 
Home. 

The Two year basketball team, com bed 

by "Kr-d" It.dl '21 . shows a very creditable 
record for the lansoa m-i completed, and 

indications |xiinl to even a more success- 
ful our- next year, for only two of the 

s ven regulars on the squad will g ra dua te 
in June. The Shorthorns won 8 out of 
13 games played, including a victory ovei 

Cathedral High School, one of the two 

teams to del. at t he freshmen. I our ot 
the losses receiver! were on Strange floors 
against some of the best rpiintets in 

western Massnchusetts Holyoke, Drury, 

St. Joseph's, Sacred Heart, and Hopkins 
Academy, were the teams able to turn 
bark the Two Years. Victories were 
registered over Turners Falls, Arms 
Academy, Amherst High, Northampton 
( ommerical College, Clarke School. Ar- 
lington (Vt.), Cathedral, anrl Gnsenfield. 

The t ot al number of [Mints scored was 
275, while their opiionents made 22r». 
Holland was high scorer with 127 counters 
to his credit, while Ryan harl 08 anrl 
West collected 54. Of the remainder of 
the squad consisting of V'iale, Parsons, 
Mass;!, anrl Tefft, only Parsons and 
Masea are seniors, so a strong team should 
represent the Two Years next winter. 



Student Pastor Urges 

Christian Propaganda 

Williams Minister Addresses Mem- 
bers of Student Volunteer Conven- 
tion. 



In his sermon at r hajxd last Sunday, to 
the student! rif tin- College and Un- 
delegates of t In- Student Volunteer Con- 
vention, Reverend J. H. Twkhell, student 

pastor of Williams College, spoke on 

"Christian Propaganda." Mr. Twtchell 

(Continued on Paga 2) 



The Mass. Aggie quintet, in their anal 
game of the season, against t In- Tufts 
five, came out on top .'t;t to 21. Without 
an\ qui tion, Temple «,h the outstanding 

player on the tl«>or. Ha accounted for 
nineteen points, shooting seven out of 
eight louls and six Boor baskets. How 
ever, mere points scored do not, l>\ on 
means, tell t he complete story of his 
game which should mark him as material 

for any tram in the 1 ast ami certainly 

should give him a place on all mythical 
teams in this part ot the country. 

Smile\' was another who played pht 
nomenal basketball.' In spite of the fact 
that be is not of the rangy type, bttl 
rpiite the opposite, he is a very effective 

back, m\. in. d>l\ taking the kill awav 
from his op|M>nciit; it is wiertl from the 
sidr lines, to notice how olten t he hall 
■rill disappear momenta! ilv in the midst 
of a group of lags ami amis, ami when it 

reappears, Smiles is calmly dribbling it 

down the floor. He is also DM of the 
fast est men on the floor and his cuts are 
beautiful. 

Ami since we have stalled to eulogize 
we must mention Jones, who is one of thr- 
ums! effective centers that Aggie has had 

for some time. In this game lie out juiii|m d 
Br o th ers almost every time anrl then 
dropping back under the basket he 
turned himself into a windmill which 
stationed itself in front of every Tufts 
marksman. 

The first half was a slow affair with the 
advantage always tor the Agates. Tufts 
•cored two single DOSBtS while the Agates 
sscrc piling up nine |x>ints. Moth teams 
tallied for three more anrl then the Agates 
BBOSmpohasd the scoring to the end of 
the half when the score read It to 5. 

In the second half the Agates tossed in 
three more double -counters liefore the 
Jumltonians could tally. Hut in the next 
few minutes the latter dropped in two 
foul shots anrl two llooi baskets, making 
the count 25 to II. Srx>n the count h.nl 
jumped to 2t"> to 15, whan thr- Agates 
rallied for five more |x>ints only to hase 
the Medloidites complete three additional 

lloor baskets The final points were mads 

by MAC., thus bringing the count to 

33-21 is the final whistle bless. In this 
period Tufts o uts cored the Agates by tern 

IHiints, sshiih is due, in pail at leant, to 
the fact that so many substitutions were 
made in the Aggie ranks. 

For lulls. French was the ahooting 
ace. Captain Donson was sns effective 

al t lines in holding up the Aggie onslaught. 
I In- slum 



,11 s : 

MASS. At.i.ll 

It I- P 



II IIS 



PSI U iili.iMi'-i.il o n u 

Thorn • 

I iiii|jI<-.Ii 

lone*/ 

Murdoush.c 

1 ,1'tlui.rli 
|>-n-«-n i h 

1 1, 
Smiley Jb 
Cuatafsoajb 

Total- 



I towaonjb 

O n II AIm.iIi.hm- il, 

ft 7 19 Brothr 

n »• Nlcho 

I I Krench.lt 

1 I !» Minsl,.,niii,tl 
n o Stank 







o n 
1L' B 



Totals 



I P. 

I i :t 

i) a 2 

O II II 

II (I 

a t ti 

'i i i 

a ii » 



i _'i 



Score at half Una M \< IB, fiitm 5 Refer** 



Lambda Chi Alpha 

Wins Hoop Series 

Alpha Camma Rho Defeated in 
Playoff for Title. 



Lambda (hi Alpha has been declared 
winner of the interfraternity basketball 
tournament by virtue of its victory over 

Alpha Gamma Rho, leader in the second 
rli vision. The game was extremely close, 
the score at half time In-ing 5 to 4 and the 
final count reading X to Ii. Other contests 
marking the conclusion of tin- season last 
week resulted as follows: Sigma I'hi 

Kpsilon ik, Delta I'hi Alpha 12; Lambda 
Chi Alpha IS, K. K. 5; O. T. V. 19, Theta 

(Continued on Page S) 



OPPONKNT'S SCORES 



Norwich 24, Vermont 20 
Harvard '{ti. Brown 24 
Conn. A fifties 51, Trinity SM 
Lowell Textile I". Norwich 13 
New Hampshire 26, Tufts 21 
Conn. Aftfties 4.L ft I State 89 
llai sard 33, Worcester 22 






• 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 1926 






THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Official newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



PERSONALS 



j 



BOARD OF EDITORS 
Mast T. Boyd '26 Editor-in-Chief 

Jqa* F. Lambert 26 Managing Editor 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 



Esltsrtsl 
Clatr Press 
Atklttics 



Campui Newt 



C«-Ed New. 
Alumni 
Faculty News 



Mary T. Boyd '2« 

Mary T. Boyd '26 

William L. Dole '! 

Harold L. Clark 

L. Rocewbll Smith. Jr. 

Ernest L. Spencer 

Ellsworth Barnard 

Edward H. Nichols. 

William R. Phinnby. 

Frances C. Bruce '27 

Josephine Paniica '28 

W. Gordon Hunter '29 



•28 
'28 
'28 
'28 
■29 
'29 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Alyin G. Stevens 26 Business Manager 

Charles P. Reed '26 Advertising Manager 

Lewis H. Whitaker '27 Circulation Manager 

» John E. White "27 

Douglas W. Losing '28 

Charles F. Clacg "27 

Edwin A. Wilder '28 



RURAL NEWSPAPERS 

Sime the advent of Agricultural English 
and Agricultural Engineering, the Collegian 
has decided to join the movement and 
become a worthy organ of the institution 
which it represents. In view of the fact 
that gossip COA*titUtM ■ large part of 
rural news sheets we have secured an 
unctnsored list of campus gossip. We 
hops, that no one will take offense at any 
of the remarks if they happen to fit too 
well. The Collegian Editors are not re- 
sponsible if they hear too much. Do not 
kick, patronize our advertisers. 

W. L. D. 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
gcribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
P^t Office "Accepted for «^»f.**«^L^ 

l«iWs3^ 

examinationIchedule 



Montague White '26, took advantage 
of his recent illness, which forced him to 
stay at home for a few nights, to write a 
thesis for Agronomy 77. The subject of 
his thesis was agricultural methods in 
China. 

Horace T. Brockway, Jr. '28, has been 
spending a few days at his home in South 
Madley, recuperating from the effects of 
I trip to see the basketball game with 
Tufts and also from too much studying. 

The staff of waiters at the Colonial Inn 
was sadly depleted by the flu epidemic 
last week. 

W. Gerald Anistein '27 s|>ent last 
Sunday at his summer residence in South 
1 )ei Tiicld 



Following the eoinbincd concert of the 
Musical Clubs and the ('.ids' < .lee Club 
on Saturday evening, March 13, there 
will be dancing in the Memorial Building 
for members of the clubs and their guests. 

Herbert J. Harris '27 of Springfield has 
been recently elector! editor and head of 

the literary department of the 1927 Index. 
He has been serving in this capacity dur- 
ing the past two terms and therefore is 
well fitted to take active charge of the 
department. 

Miriam H. Huss '29, of Newton Center, 
has been forced to give up her part in the 
Prom Show because of ineligibility. As a 
result o the tryouts held on January 20, 
Miss Huss was picked to play the part of 
"Miss Neville". 

Marguerite R. Bosworth '26, of Holyoke 
will take the part left vacant by the 
withdrawal of Miss Huss in the Prom 
Show. Miss Bosworth has been serving 
as the women's understudy prior to this 
change. 

Theodore J. (irant '2b\ has been assist- 
ing Lewis H. Whitaker '27, of Hadley, in 
his work as Manager of the Musical 
Clubs. It was largely through the efforts 
of (irant that the trip on the week-end 
of February 27-28 was made possible. 

The elimination rounds will Ik- fired 
during this week in order that the riHe 
team which will represent M.A.C. in the 
meet with Norwich may be picked. Much 
interest has been manifested by the 
cedetl throughout the trials and the 
individual places on the team have been 
Mejeriy sougjit. 



On Friday evening, March 12, the 
Maroon Key Society will hold a regular 
Friday night dance in the Memorial 
Building. It will begin at the close of the 
Social Union concert and will continue 
until eleven o'clock. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 12. 1926 



TUTORING 

Do your themes come back 
distastefully decorated in blue? 

See JOHN F. LAMBERT at the 

Lambda C hi Alpha House. Tel. &S* 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 
WITH EVERY PAIR OF 

MUNSINGWEAR and MEDAL1A 
SILK HOSE 

BIG ASSORTMENT OF THE 
LATEST SHADES AT 

$1.00 $U9 $1.75 

G. Edward Fisher 



STUDENT PASTOR URGES 
Continued from Page 1) 

emphasized the fact that the age we .in- 
living in is a great age of advertising 
Advertising is a great help to Christianity 
as well as to the commercial world, Imh 
underneath this veiu-er of propaganda 
there must Ik- truth, or we shall fail. VY, 
must not try to tell what w ■ believe. \VV 
must live Christian lives an 1 then use our 
propaganda. "The only man who spn.i |. 
Christianity is the man who lives | 
Christian life." 



MONDAY 
MARCH IS 

7.50-"».50 a. m. 
Frew* 9 Fll l) 

(Mr. Ilalli<l;«y) 
French 5 1*11 1 

(Mr. Ashley) 
French •"> 

i \li Ktllcii 
( ,< mi. m - 

(Mr. Julian) 
Ak Be -'«'. 
K. 11 Life 39 
An Ed •"•»'. 



G Anil 



An Hus "«1 
< hem 52 

Ei Stx ">1 
Imik M 
Miirn .".»> 
Ak Ec 7H 
Agron 77 
Und t.iu.l --II 



ill 

•Jl'J 

102 

;i!C 

( . 28 

KM K 

111 

M 28 

19 

lid 

Wll A 



Gn ii sin 98 

M.itli lit> 
\k !•> 69 
French 51 
Math .">1 
Micro 61 
Vet 50 
Ens 79 
Knt !M> 1 
Veg < isrd 76 
An Kuk 7K 



G 96 

Mil li 

:uti 

in i 

MBG 

M -'s 

VL B 

110 
KM K. 
Fll U 

!•_' 



Monday. 10-IJ *». m. 
Math 9 HBGJ&S 

Km .">i ' ' ' K 

Km 66 > '; l ' 

Und Gaid 51 WW £ 

II,, ti 7(1 ''" ' 



Wednesday 
10-12 a. in. 

\mi, 9 < ■ 96, 98, Aud 
Phytic* '-'<> KH P, II 
Kami MH 51. I. II 1«»-' 

ll,,it Mfga 76 l'l- M 
I .in,l Gard 81 Wll H 
V.t 7<» VI. ■ 

Wednesday 
2-4 p. m. 
Math i , , 

113, 111. 11". 1". KH 
Knt 62 (UK 

Pom ">i Wll H 

Poull 51 :{ '- 

An llu-7t') 1- 




M on day. 

-I. '-'ti 
i hem t'.L' 
l-l, ,n ">1 
Pots 61 
Agron 78 

l'i, in 7C> 



2-4 p 



m. 
Aud 

( . 26 
111 ( 

Wll K 
( » t t i. e 

Wll A 



Tlll'KSDA^ 
MARCH •« 

7. 50-1. Mi a. m. 



It I Sl)\V 
MARCH ll> 

7.50-«».M> .<• I"- 

German 5 
French 26 
French 29 
German 26 
Ag Ed ">l 
KllK •>•; 
( ,.,,.■ ,,, :.i I 

lli-t & Gov .",1 
Math 53 
Veg Gard 52 
llu Ec 78 
( hem 88 
Vet 76 
An Ed W 



G 2H 

lilt 

1 II II 

G 28 

102 

llt> 

G Aud 

II I P 

Mil B 

11 1 l> 
11 1 

G '-'ti 

VL H 

316 



Mil J 

Mil 26 
Ak Ed •'■•"> 
Kiik 5 I 
Mil .">1 
S],,itii -li ",l 
A Ed V.-, 
Eni '"> II 
Math 77 
Mil 78 



( II A 
EB 1) 

ill 
102 

Mil l> 
III II 

I HI 

EB K 

MB B 
MB (. 




Most Men 



WATCH OUR WINDOW DISPLAY 
for our new 

. . EASTER MODELS . . 

JOHN FOTOS 

SELF-SERVICE SHOE STORE 

COLLEGE SHOES 

TOWN PRICES 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



Di 



te on 



Third 



cr earlier. Only one in ten 
finally achieves financial in- 
dependence. 

But you can do so. if during 
your e-rlier years you provide 
for the later ones through the 
Life Income Plan. 
The Pbn includes first. 
$10,000 insurance and $100 
monthly when you're (Hsabled. 
Later, £ I CO monthly f -»r L.'e — 
certain income for you Ct the 
time when r. GCt people are 
: lipping back. Telephone tr 
write for descriptive booklet. 

Connecticut General 
Lifelnsuranc3 Company 




ROY D. HARRIS 

P.O. Box 273 Tel. Greenfield 1*73 M 

Greenfield, Mass. 



WRIGLEYS 

sjs|sskw ■■ ev More 

M \mW for your 

WsW L money 

■ • ■ m# 

the best Peppermint 

Chewing Sweet for 

any money 



TO A DOGFISH 



Tuesday. 10-12 a. B*. 
Math 2 MBG.D 



Am t.nvt 25 
Unit '-'H 

Dairy .">1 
Physics 51 
( hem SI 
Knt 77 
Kami Mftl 7S 



EB D 
KM F 

II \l 
l'L K 
( . 28 

EB K 
316 



Tuesday. 2-4 p. SB. 
French 5II1.V Mil' 
German 2 1\ , \ 1 

( , Aad 

An llu> 86 
( linn 26 
Forest i v r ' ( '< 
German 51 I 



Floii 7»> 
French 76 

Poult 7. 
Eni •"><; 
Zoo! 51 



102 

( . 26 
III II 

G 28 
HI C 
111 l> 
13 
EB K 
E K ( . 



WEDNESDAY 

MARCH 17 

7. 50-9. SO a. m. 

As Ed 2? »" 

Chetn 80 G 2* 



Thursday. 10-12 a.m. 

Eng 28 
Mi Jackson 1 13, 1 I I 
Mr. Patterson 102 
Mi Prince II" 

Mi. Rand i ' • 

Thursday. 2-4 p. m. 
Chem 2 G».» 

( hem .", G Aud 

Rur Kuk 33 1 !" 

KRIDAY 

MARCH l» 

7M)-«».S0 a. m. 

/,,,,i at bb "■ '■ 

Friday. 10-12 a. m. 
Ens 1 EH '•' 

Kuk 2 

Mr iacksoa <'■ 36. -" 

Mr. Patterson 

Mr Prince 110. m 

Mr. Rand W~ 

BY arranc;emkm 

A^ Ec81 

An 1' , v -' 

An Ed 80 

An Hu« Dairy M 

Bol 51, 7ti. 79 

Chem 90. 92, 94.96 

German 7 1 .^ 

Micro 51, 7.">. SO 
Mn>ii .">1 
Pom Bl 

K II 1-ilV 78.82 
Km Soc80 
Spanish 7(i 

ZoiiIokv 70 



Two-Year Examination Schedule 



MONDAY 
MARCH 15 
10-12 a. m. 



Dairy S.'i 
Hort SI 
Hon Mfx* SI 
Motor- SJ 
Pom S7 
Rur Sot SI 



II. M 
FH l- 
FL C 
113, 1H 
Wll K 
EB D 



Hint S3 
Micro SI 

Pom S2 
Poult SO 
Poult S4 

Y.-k Gard S3 



KH II 

M 38 

Wll K 

11-1 

lit! 

Fll I) 



Monday. 2-4 p. m 



An HusS2 

An Hus S6 
Klori St 
Poult S2 
Rur Ens S7 
Veg Gasrl S4 



102 

111 

FH K 

110 

u:i. in 
KH D 



TUESDAY 
MARCH lb 
10-12 a. m. 

An Hus S4 102 

Klori S2 FH C 



Tuesday, 2-4 p. m. 
Bus Law SI EB D 

Farm Mgt S2 113. 114 
Hort SO Wll B 

Pom 74 Wll A 

WEDNESDAY 

MARCH 17 
7.5O-».50 a. m. 

Hort SX FH F 

Rur Eng SI 102 

Rur Eng S4 111 

BY ARRANGEMENT 

Home Ec S2. SO s:> 



NOTE.— The hours scheduled ior examination 
aiay not be changed. (Rule book, sec. VII 1.) 
In case of a conflict between a repeat and an 
advanced courae, the advanced course examin- 
ation is to be taken as scheduled and arrangement 
made with the instructor in charge of the repeat 
course for the examination in that subject. 



To A Dogfish 
Dogfiaa 

Long p'' |X dogfish 
Sunken i-yr<l dogfish, 
Dogfish scaly and slimy, 
Dogfish \ iU- and stinking, 
To thee 1 sin^. 

Once thou wirt li\in«, free 

As the \ast deep where thou di<lst dwell, 

but now 
How art thou fallen; 
The victim, like us all, 
Of a college pro fe sso r . 
Who tries to teach Zoology to us. 

Alas! For thou art (load. 

Thou canst not know 

That thou art unto us 

A vile abomination, 

Subject for weary hours of weary work 

Antl spontaneous profanity. 

Because some person thinks 

I hat we can understand zoology 

By cutting. gOMghsg, tearing thee apart, 

And then trying 

To draw the features 

Of thy internal anatomy, to show 

Their morphological relations 
To — we do not know just what. 

Dogfish, 1 pity thee! 
For though thou art to us 
An instrument of torture. 
Vet we know- 
It is no fault of thine. 

We are both victims 

Of the zoology department. 

But thou art dead, and thy sufferings 

Are ended, and now 

It is 1 who suffer 

In a lost cause. And as I, 

With repugnance and abhorrence, 

Cut into thee, and view 

The grisly thing before me, 

I pity thee! 

Dogfish! 

Long gray dogfish, 

Sunken eyed dogfish, 

Dogfish scaly and slimy, 

Dogfish vile ami stinking! 



Dr. Leon A. Bradley, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Microbiology, has recently pur- 
chased a i'.'-Ti Essex coach. 



MISSIONARY CONFERENCE 

(Continued from Pafte 1) 

afternoon, given by l>r. D. J. Fleming. 

A banquet was held in Draper Hall which 
was followed by an interesting talk by 
Miss Jean Dickinson on "The Missionary 
As He Is." Miss Dickinson has recently 
returned from China. 

Sunday morning the meeting was held 
in conjunction with the college chapel 
exercises. The sermon was given by Dr. 
Joseph II. Twitchell, student pastor at 
William- College. The conference was 
concluded Sunday afternoon by a (lis 
cussion held in Memorial Hall on "The 
Missionary Call." The entire discussion 
was led by the student speakers from t In- 
different colleges represented. The dis 
CUesion was closed by a short talk by 

Reverend Fay R. Campbell, the V.M.C. 

A. Secretary at Vale. 

At this conference the following officers 
were elected for the coining year: presi- 
dent, Lincoln Hale, Yale Divinity School; 
vice-president. Miss Josephine Wool folk, 
Smith College; secretary, Miss Kleanor 
1'ssher, Mt. Holyoke College; treasurer, 
Harold Commons, Williams College; dele- 
gate to the National Council, James 
Stringham, Yale University; and alternate 
delegate, Miss Joanne Van Der Spek, 
Hartford Theological Seminary. Much 
credit is due to Miss Carmeta Sargent '29 
and Mr. John B. Ilanna for the success 
of the convention. 




This famous protein product of corn is composed 
wholly of the gluten and bran of sound, whole corn. 
There is lesj> than 8 pounds of bran in each 100 pounds. 
The Mass. Experiment Station says corn bran is 
equal to wheat bran. 

Corn Gluten Feed is safe in any quantity. Many feeders 
have fed it straight as a substitute for corn. One ton contains 
the protein, vitamines and mineral salts of nearly four tons of 
whole corn. 

Feed Corn Gluten Feed with vour corn, oats and barley. Y our 
leguminous roughages will supply all the protein •variety the 
animal wants or needs. This has been fully demonstrated by 
practical feed lot experience. 

Our $15,000.00 Prize Contest 

On April 1 our Prize Contest will start and the following prizes 
will be awarded and paid to good feeders: 



14 Prizes for Cow Testing Associations 
14 Prizes for Individual Dairy Herds 

7 Prizes for Championship Cows 
14 Prizes for Beef Cattle Feeders 
12 Prizes for supervisors or verifiers 
24 Prizes for herd managers 
37 Prises for co-operating feed dealers 



$ 3,000.00 
2,100.00 
1,000.00 
2,500.00 
2,650.00 
1,250.00 
2,500.00 



FRESHMAN QUINTET ENDS 
(Continued front Pafte 1) 

Baseball practice for the freshmen will 
start immediately after the spring vaca- 
tion, and it is hoped that a large number 
of candidates will appear. Aspirants for 
the battery positions are asked to report 
to "Red" Ball, varsity baseball coach. 



122 Prizes, totalinr $15,000.00 

Every feeder of six or more dairy cows, or forty or more beef 
cattle is invited to enter this contest. The rules are few and simple 
and no entry fee is charged. The contest will end September 30. 
1 0,16. 

This is a big educational program of a great basic industry. * 
will be conducted on the highest possible plane and is entitled to 
the same support given to state fairs and livestock shows. 

The rules and conditions are fully given in our Bulletin No. 4- 
Write for it today. 

Associated Corn Products Manufacturers) 

Feed Research Department 
Hugh C. Vmn Pe/f, Director 

209 South La Salle St., Chicago, III. 



No. 31 



DOt= 




To serve the discriminating college trade many prominent authorities co-ordi- 
nate with Scheyet, year after year, in designing and creating new styles. 

SCHEYER TAILORED means the highest type of fine hand workmanship. 

New shipments every day. —WA LSH1ZA TION l\ 1 1 N 



The Best in Drug Store Merchandise 

The Best in Drug Store Service 

HENRY ADAMS & COMPANY 



7**5 te*a£L 



The only place in town to buy 

strictly home made 
BREAD AND PASTRY 

IS AT 

DRURY'S 

College orders receive prompt 
attention 



13 Amity Street 
120 Pleasant Street 

DRURY'S BAKERY 



NORTHAMPTON 

ACADEMY OF MUSIC 



Paul Hansell presents 

The Mortbampton Repertory Company 

— THIS WEEK — 

"JUST MARRIED" 

By Adelaide Matthews and Ann Nichols 
A Joyous Farce-Comedy 

Next Week 
"The Cat and The Canary* 

By John Willard 
A Thrilling Mystery Melodrama 

Evenings at 8.16 Sat. Mat. at 2.15 

Prices: 50c. to $1.10. (including tax) 

Phone 435 



THOMPSON'S TIMELY TALKS 

It** about time to get out your old tennis 
racket and have it restrung. We do this and 
the work is guaranteed. We alto have on hand 
at all time* a complete line of tennis racket*. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP 

REAR AMHKRST BANK 



WINCHESTER 

Sporting and Athletic Goods 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE 

AND KITCHEN GOODS 
PLUMBING AND HEATING 



The Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co. 

THE WINCHESTER STORE 



DNITED STATES HOTEL 

LINCOLN, BEACH AND KINGSTON STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



Boston Headquarters for all M. A. C. and 
many other College Teams and Clubs 

EUROPEAN PLAN $2.00 UP 

Club Breakfast and Special Luncheons 

and Dinners 



JAMES G. HICKEY, 



Manager 



PRINCIPAL TELLS STORY 
(Continued from I'aite 1) 

meats of the war, tad w.is shot t<> pieces, 

Tom COUld not Ik- indtmd to leave tin- 

spot wlu re his i oinp.my was annihilated. 
The iHxt morniag hi- was found dead, 

Mr. Hoyden said that Tom was tie 

fraatasj man at had tvtf met. Through 

his whole lift- Tom maintained his indi- 
viduality. Tom's mind was COBCtatrated 

on his daily tasks. Because he did p.i\ 
so little attention to the social customs 
and manners of other Dtoptt, he was able 
to reach heights of character which are 

reached l>y few people. 



JAMES A. LOWELL 



BOOKSELLER 



M. A. C. SEAL 

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AMHERST 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 12, 1926 









Town Hall, Amherst 



Wed. 
Thurs. 

l.M. 

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LAMBDA CHI ALPHA WINS 

(Continued from Page 1) 

Chi i<); Kappa Epsilon 10. A. T. <•• 21. 

The past season has been more success- 
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played at least six names, k> v '"« ■ real 
indication of its merits, in contrast to the 
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final standing of the groups it aa follows- 




ST. PATRICK'S DAY 

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John B. Temple *26 is at his home in 
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<T> 1926 




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CLOTHES CLOTHES, CLOTHES— 

AN OLD STORY BUT AN EVER PRESENT NEED A NECESSITY WHICH CAN BEST BE FILLED BY 

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SOUTH WICK BROS. & GAUL* 



■ 



Vol. XXXVI. 



AMHERST, MASS., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 1926 



a- 
p 



No. 21 



FINAL PLANS FOR 
PROM COMPLETED 



Varsity Baseball Game will be Sub- 
stituted fur Cabaret on (Musing Day. 

Worthy Hill and his 7-piece band from 
Hartford wid furnish, without doubt, the 
beet dance static thai has ever been heard 
,it .my M.AC, dance. Thin team has 

already played for proms at Hamilton, 

\p. Holyoke, Trinity, and Wealeyan. At 
the Smith College Spring Dance several 
veekt ago. Worthy Hill was voted as the 

1,,-t orchestra p resen t at the Dance, and 

yaa applauded time and again. His 

pianist, Wilson Innet, has refuted teveral 
offer* to play with some of the larger 

teams in New York. There will be plenty 
Hi "hot" choruses by Duncan Kennedy 
anil Harry Aptcr on the clarinets and 
tfrsigbt sax. Worthy Hill himself gets a 

peal number of brilliant effects on the 
trumpet. Eddie Gray on the trombone 
and Nils Anderson on the banjo work 
well together on trick obligatot, and 
plenty of snap and rhythm from Ken 
(rosstield's drums runs through every 
danCC tO give an easy dance tempo. 

Worthy HuTs popularity in collegiate 
circles is shown clearly by his many 
engagements, and the Prom Committee, 
vi which Everett J. Pytt Ul chairman, is 
fortunate in engaging his orchestra for 
the Prom. 

After the Prom Show, "She Stoops to 
Conquer,' 1 which is to lx- given on Thurs- 
day night this year, several fraternities 
will hold their annual spring house dances. 
\XtU there seems to !«• vary little 
interest in afternoon dancing, the cabaret 
will bt omitted, and the Prom season will 
dote with the varsity baseball game on 

Saturday afternoon. 

The patrons and patronesses for the 
Pirom will Ik- President and \Ik Edward 
If, lewis. Dean and Mrs. William L. 
Machmer, and Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. 
Phillips. Miss Lttlu Diether, manager ot 

the Dining Hall, has prepared a very 

live menu for the Prom supper. 
The prelims have been gOtttg tast and 
indicate that the senior date will lx- well 

r ep r esente d along with the juniors. Any- 
one desiring to attend Prom should tee 
note member of the committee at toon 
ossible. 



DIRECTOR DANA 

LEAVES FOR EUROPE 



Will Represent This Country at 
World's Forestry Congress. 



Samuel T. Dana, Director of the 
Northeastern Forest Experiment Station 
a: MAC, has been designated by the 
Secretary of Agriculture as the official 
representative of the Department of 
Agriculture to the World's Forestr) 
1 ongrest in Rome from April 2B to May 
■">. The Congress is being held at the 
'i quest of the (iencral Assembly of the 
International Institute of Agriculture and 
■ under the auspices of that Institute and 
the Italian government. 

Forestry is becoming more and more a 
natter of world concern, and there is no 
I 1 "-! ion but that a solution of many 
problems involved in the production a^d 
'iistribution of adequate supplies oygff^st 
products will be greatly facilitated by 
ilaboration of experts in this field. 
the Co ngres s promises to be the largest 
international gathering of foresters ever 
Wd. Assurance has been received that 
official representatives of more than forty 
•^ernnients will attend the Congress, in 
addition to representatives of a large 
number of educational institutions and 
uther organizations. 

Immediately preceding the World's 
Forestry Congress, Director Dana will 
Ktead the General Assembly of the 
International Institute of Agriculture at 
Home as a representative of the United 
States Department of Agriculture. The 
General Assembly is the governing body 
w the Institute, and will consider among 
Knet things the collection of international 
>tatisti( ^ relating to forests and forest 
prodtt 

Director Dana sailed from New York, 
•W 7, on the President Harding of the 
Ln 'ted States Lines. Following his atten- 
' a nce at the two meetings in Rome, he 
*''l visit a number of forest experiment 
(Continued on Page 4; 



Extension Director 

Resigns From Staff 

Director \\ i I lard Accepts Position at 
Michigan State College. 



John D. Willard recently resigned his 
position as Director of the Extension 
Service in Massachusetts, ami hat accep- 
ted a position ai Michigan State College. 

Hie loss of Director Willard. who begin- 
his new work on September 1, will be 
keenly felt throughout the State. a> well 
as in the vicinity o! Amherst, where lu- 
ll, i- spent most of his lite. 

Mr. Willard received hi> b.A. from 

Amherst College in 1907, and his Ms. 

from M.A.C. in 1 ( .>U.">. He was pastor of 

teveral rural churches from 1907 to 1918; 
Secretary of the Franklin County Farm 
Bureau, I'.u.'i 16; Secretary of the Mnaas 

chusetts Food Administration and the 
Massachusetts lood Production Com- 
mittee, 1917 IS; l.\tcn»ion Professor of 

Economics and Marketing, 1919; Deputy 

On the Massachusetts Special Committee 
on the Necessities ol Life, 1919 80; and 
Director of the Extension Service, M.A.C., 
1980 80. 
While serving as Director of the 

Extension Service, he has brought about 

a close relationship between the State 

and County Fttrnsion Services; has 

deve lop ed extension work in home SCO 
nomics in Massachusetts to the high level 

which it has attained at present; and hat 

been able tO obtain and hold a COrpt ol 
extension specialists who have great l\ 
assisted in developing and placing (Men 
sion work in Massachusetts to the place 
where it is tod.n . 



Two Sophomores 
Elected Captain 

Hockey and Relay Captaincies go to 
Members of Class of '28. 



Two tophofnoret wen h on or ed last 
week bv el ec t io n to sport captaincies, 

Joseph II. Forest of Arlington and I. 

Stanley Hall of l.ynn. Forest was cfaoses 
to lend the i'.t27 bochej sextet, end Hall 

will bend the relay SOUnd next winter. 
It is rather an unusual occurrence to 

have two captains elected from the 

sophomore dass. 

Hall has been number three man on the 

\ggte relay team during the past season 

when he was one of the mainstays ol 
the team. His per for m ance at the loith 
Regimental Games al Springfield a/as also 
very creditable in the fastest qualifying 

heel for the 300 meter race, but he WBt 

deprived of ■ place in the finals i>y an 

unfortunate accident oa one of the turns. 

Forest has proven ■ versatile wing in 

his first year at collegiate hockey. He is 
a fast skater, a clever stick handler, and 

a good shot as is evidenced by the fact 

that he was tied with Captain "Buddy" 
Molterg for scoring honors last winter, 
lie is one of three sophomores who will 
form the nucleus for the PJ27 sextet. 



BASEBALL SQUAD HAS 
ASSURING CANDIDATES 



Begins Outdoor Practice After ? 
Week in Amherst Cage. 



A promising squad of aspirants for 
p»itions on the M.A.C. baseball nine 

have !>een reporting to Coach "Red" Ball 

since the opening of the spring term. On 
account of the vacation i>eriod at Amherst 
College, the Aggie nine was able to use 
the new Amherst cage last week. An 
informal game was staged on Saturday 
afternoon, and with the aid of a few 
special ground rules, an exciting contest 
ensued. There is room for an entire 
infield in the cage, but the outfield is 
handicapped by indoor practice. 

Captain Temple has been unable to 
play thus far because of illness, but will 
probably assume the catching burden 
when he reports. At present Malley and 
Briggs are doing most of the receiving. 
Nash and Davenport, two veteran hurlers, 
and Tufts, a sophomore, are the out- 
standing pitching candidates. In the 
infield, McYey and Haertl are back at 
first and second, while Moriarity and 
Thompson seem to have the call at short 
and third respectively. Other likely in- 
fielders are McGuire at first, Redgrave 
(Continued on Page 2) 



COLLEGIAN BOARD 
REORGANIZED 

Small Number of Juniors Make Task 
Difficult in Editorial Department. 

Election time has COmS and gone and 

the Collegian once more has a changed 

editorial Board. Considerable difficulty 

was experienced this veat bees use of the 

small number of juniois on the board 
eligible to till the positions ol Kditor-in- 
Chiel and Managing Editor. Mar) T. 
Boyd '30 of Outage, Florida, who has 
lutn the Editor-in-Chief for the past 

two t<i ins, has volunteered to serve in 
ih. n office during the spring term. 

A plan has been worked out whereby 
the present sophomores on the board will 

alternate on Managing Editor. Each 

sophomore will sei\e as Managing Editor 

i"i a definite number of issues, the exact 

division to be determined later. The 
lour sophomores eligible to hold this 

office are Ernest L spencer, Harold E. 

Clark, Ellsworth Barnard, and I.. Koi k 
well Smith, Jr., Kmest Spencer being 
elected to act in this position during the 
spring term. 

William I.. Dole '27 will continue to 
head the athletic department fur the 
Spring term, assisted by Harold E. 

(lark '38 and I-. R ock we l l Smith, Jr., "2X. 
Ernest I.. Spencer '38 heads the campus 
department again, assisted by Kllsworth 
Barnaul 'L\S, \V. Gordon Hunter U't, and 

William R. PbJnaey '2«>. The faculty 
depurtmeut will be headed by Edward H. 

Nit hols '2U and the to ed department by 
Josephine I'an/ita L'H. rranccs Bruce '87 
will serve as the feature writer during the 

coming year. 

The business department has also 
elet ted hs officer! for the coming year. 
Charles 1". ClufJ '27 was t let ted as 

Business Manager, Lewis H. Whitaker '27 

.is Advertising Manager, and John II. 
White '27 as Circulation Manager. 
Douglas W. Coring '88 and Kdwin A 
Wilder '2S will ,is^i>t in the various tlf 

pertinents, As t result of the freshman 
competition the following men were 
added t<> the stuff: Harold H. Ansel] '2D 
of t irantwood, N. J., Laurence A. Carruth 
'2'.t of Worcester, and William A. Egan 
'88 of Springfield. 



Letters For Winter 

Sports Announced 

Twenty-One Insignia to be Given 
in Three Major Sports. 



Letter awards tO basketball, hot key, 

and track men were announced last week 

by the Joint Committee on Intercollegiate 

Athletics, 

In basketball, Captain John Temple, 
Ray Smiley, Lawrence Jones, Merrill 

I'artenheimer, Raymond Griffin, Howard 

Thomas, G e o r g e Kelso, Harold Jensen, 
and Manager Preston Davenport were 
voted insignia. Of these, only I'arten- 
heimer. Griffin, and Thomas will be eligi 
I ile for next year's varsity. 

Seven hockey letters were awarded to 
the following men: Captain Herbert 

Moberg, Royal Potter, Cary Pahner, 
Joseph Forest, Howard Abrahamson, 

Paul I rise, and Manager Donald Williams 
forest, Frese, and Abrahamson are all 
sophomores who will form the nucleus for 
next winter's sextet. 

Four members of the relay stpjad, 
Captain Loren Sniffen, Thomas Heane- 

(Continued on Pate 4) 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



"The beginning of wisdom is the 
knowledge of one's faults." 

— Epicurus 



Wednesday — 

Assembly. Mr. Caylord W. Doug- 
last, Wilbraham Academy, Wil- 
braham. 

7.( M) p. m. ('.id's Clee Club Concert 
at Amherst. 
Thursday — 

7.«i5 p. m. Interfraternity Confer" 
ente. 

Friday— 

7.4o p. m. Maroon Key Dance. 
Sunday — 

9.10 a. m. Sunday Chapel. 



M.A.C Meets Kansas 
In No-Decision Debate 



Large Audience Attends Unique 
Debate on Child Labor Amendment. 

The Kansas Si.n. Agricultural College 

debating team met iii a no-tleicision con 

test with the M.AC, debaters in Bowker 
Auditorium, Sat unlay evening, March IS, 
before a large audience. 

The subject under discussion was "Re- 
solved, thai the states should ratifv the 

Child Labor Amendment." M.A.C up- 
held the affirmative side of the question 
and was represented by Herman E, 
Pickens ':>7 and I'.lliot P. Dodgs '88, 
Robert K. Hedbsrg 'J7 and Carl Taykx 

'27 Upheld the negative for Kansas. The 
CO S Ch at of the teams were, for M.A.C., 
Professor Waller R, Prince, ami for 
Kansas, Professor II. B. Simmers. De,m 
William L. Machmer was the presiding 
officer. 

I he debate was conducted oa the 
Oxford IM.m, using extemporaneous dt 

livery, each speaker being allowed fifteen 

minutes for rebuttal and constructive 

argument. One of the main character 
istics of the debate was the large amount 
ol statist its brought forward by each 
sitle in its own support of its statements. 
Much of the argument was about these 
(acts and figures. Pickens of M.A.C. SUM 

obliged to co m pe t e under the handicap 

of a bad cold which nearly deprived him 

of the use of his voice. Hy common 
agreement there was no decision made 
as to who hail the best of the argument. 
Although the debating team has no 
more debates scheduled, there is a |>ossi 

bilitv of a debate with B. c. 



Polish Farmers 
Meet on Campus 

Polish Farmers' Day Draws Large 
< •aihcring to Campus. 



Polish Farmers' Day, which is held 

annually on the ( ollege t ainpiis. ttnik 

place this year on Saturday, March uo, 

and was one of the most tUOCSSsfttl of 
these meetings that has tVCT been held. 
About 22S |H-rsoiis were present, in- 
cluding about 26 children, ami everyone 

enjoyed the excellent program winch had 

bein arranged. One feature which created 

ninth interest wis the Roys' Livestock 
Judging Contest. Other puts of the 
program were the inspection ol the barns 
ami the |M>ulirv plant, lectures on Sgri 
cultural subjects for the men, ami led mis 

and demonstrations on various pluses of 

home work for the women. In the aln i 
noon there was ,i general meeting in 

charge of Mr. John ZseUnskj of Holyoke. 
who handled it in a most capable manner. 

The feature address of this meeting was 

delivered by Mr. Wladyslaw Joseph 

Miehcjda, of the Harvard Graduate 

School of Business Administration, on 

the subject of "The banner anil His 
Purchasing Power." 



quin; t makes 
wc.jhy record 

Aggie Ibis Highest Standing In New 
I nUla ml Three Players Honored. 

Aggie hsskntball has reached a very 
high point oi rttccest during the past 

season, a fitting culmination for the 
presence of the so called " I'liiee Rasket- 
Sers" in the line up llv winning twelve 
out ol fourteen clashes the Agates have 
Outstripped the complete list ol New 

England c o ll eges, percentiaUy shaking. 
Springfield is Aggie's closest compstker 

for this lionoi Willi ten wins ami two 

defeats. Connecticut Aggies and New 
Hampshire follow Springfield with eleven 

wins each ami three ami lour losses re 

sped ivch . 

The Three ll.iskeleeis' consist of 
Temple, Jones, and Smiley. It is signifi- 
cant (hat all three of these men w.n- 
mentioned in a group of All Kastcrn 
selections published recently in the 
Syracuse Post-Standard. Tin se selections 
were mads by a gioiip of college coaches 
representing some of the major colleges 
of the Bsjt, Temple was placed on the 
fust team, the only tilting place, for such 
a hoopa t s r as he. "Johnny" Temple has 
been Outstanding on the basketball floor 
evci since Ile anived al M.A.C. He has 
been a star arid yet he has not failed to 
be a member ol the mat hints of the 
various teams on which he has played. 
The bet! pioot that we tan otter of this 
fact is that in addition to tin Id baskets 
that he has tossed in from the Hoor he 
has made the most assists ol ansone on 

the 1896 team, .'II in aunaber. 

Jones was placed 0U the second team 
along with Scholicld ol Connecticut 
Aggie, one of the I wo men in these 
(Continued on Page 2) 



Principals Hold 

Annual Conference 



High Schools from All Parts of 
Massachusetts Represented at Joint 
Meeting. 



LARGE SQUAD REPORTS 
FOR SPRING TRACK 



Many Freshmen Report But Will 
Not Be Able to Participate. 



Seventy Candida tea, an extraordinarily 

large n umb er, have reported to Couch 

Derby of the Aggie track teams. Thirty 
of this group are freshmen, h o w ev e r, 
many of whom are ineligible on account 
of minor entrance conditions. 

Extended practice has been held up by 
adverse weather conditions, but present 
evidence indicates a worthy team rcpre 
stilting the Maroon and White this 
spring. Captain Sniffen, who alone 
amassed (Hi points last season, will lie 
the mainstay in the broad jump and 
dashes. Cerald Thompson is the leading 
candidate for the hurdles, while Tucker 
will make it interesting for his rivals in 
the pole vault and high jump, for he holds 
the record in both of these events. "Hal" 
Thurlow is the veteran discus and weight 
heaver, and "Mac" Dresser of last > ear's 
freshman team will also coni|xte for 
honors in these departments. ( lagg and 
I b nut berry are two tlistance men who 
have had considerable varsity experience. 
Hall, who is also a broadjumper, and 
(Continued on Pate 4) 



The annual tonic nine oi Principals of 

Junior anil Senior High Schools of Massa- 
chusetts was held at M A < . on Man It 
L'.'I to !_'."> inclusive, and at the same lime 
a meeting of the Massachusetts Branch 

of the National Association ol Deans >>t 
• •iris. The conference was arranged by 

the Division ul the State Department ol 

Education ol which Frank W. Wright is 
Director. The High School Principals' 

Conference was under the immediate 

direction of Mr. Frank I*. Morse, State 
Supervisor of Secondary Education. 
Prominent out-of-state speakers were 

Professor Harold < ). Kugg of Columbia 

University, who gave tWU excellent 
addresses on t he making of the high school 
turrit ilium ami its relation to education 
for citizenship. Mr. Janus M. < dass, 
Dint tor of High Sch ools for I'tniisyl 

vania, gave excellent addresses in the 

general session ami ill the junior high 

school section. Ernest W. Butterfield, 
Commissioner <>( Education for New 

Hampshire, gave, what might DC OBS> 
sidercd, the strongest at It I less of the 

conference on "The S u per v ising <»t the 
Teaching of English." 

Perhaps tin: strongest feature of tBM 

high school conferences is to be found in 
the participation by the principals them* 

selvcs in r ep or tt from the field and in 

the question-box period. In these periods 

certain principals ill whose schools some 

out standing development has bean made 
report on these sctivities, thus suggesting 

what may become in a few yean improved 
methods, in the State at large. In the 
question-box period, the questions which 
have been sent in to Mr. Morse are 
answered hy nun who have had ex|M-rieiice 
in the particular lines under consideration, 
and a general discussion u|>on these 
tpiestions frequently leads to a resolution 
or a jxjII of the house. Considerable 
advancement in secondary school ad- 
ministration ami teaching results from 
these discussions. 

In Spite of unfavorable weather and 
|ioor roads, the attendance at the con- 
ference w is large, the total attendance 
being in excess of 4U0. In some of the 
general sessions, the addition of local 
teachers and faculty members carried 
the attendance over this number. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 1926 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Oficial newspaper of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. Published every 
Wednesday by the students. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Mal x. Boyd '2« Editor-in-Chief 



Esnest L. Sfkncer '2* 



Managing Editor 



DEPARTMENT EDITORS 



Editorial 
Cldtr PreM 
Atklttlca 



Campus Newt 



Faculty News 
Feature Nt-ws 
Co-Ed Newt 



Mary T. Boyd '26 

Mary T. Boyd 28 

William L. Dole '27 

Harold E. Clark "28 

Rockwell Smith. Jr. '2* 

Ernest L. Spencer '28 

Ellsworth Barnard "28 

W. Gordon Hunter '29 

William R. Phinney. '29 

Edward R. Nichols. '29 

Frances C Bruce '27 

Josephine Panzica '28 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Charles F. Clacc '27 Business Manager 

Lkwis H. Whitaker '27 Advertising Manager 

John E. White '27 Circulation Manager 

Douglas W. Lorino '28 

Edwin A. Wilder '28 

Hanoi i> K. Anski i. IB 

I.AIKKNCK A. t AKklTH IS 

William A. Boa* II 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies 10 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Thb Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
p«.t Office Accepted for mailinR at special rate 
rfpoitfge Provided for in section 1 103 Act of Oc- 
tober 1917 authorised August 20. 1918. . 



"Labels" 

The following bit of campus charac- 
terization is quoted from The Nov 
Student. Tlu- inft-rence that we do not 
,111,1 II - intellectual consciences is just 
another good old idea working overtime, 
but the whole classification, if somewhat 
too sweeping for actual value, is interest 
ing enough for a brief consideration. We 

quote: